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Rotary Dip Switches

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H_Rocket

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They are really designed for logic level voltages (5v - very low current) and used for device programming. You could look at the decode table, however I think they would be more hassle than worth the effort. Also, these have solder tails and would be tricky to wire up with any degree of durability (unless you want to make up a break out board).
 

cwbullet

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Thanks. That is what I thought.
 

woferry

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Unfortunately the diagram on that page clearly doesn't match the part described at the top of the page, since they show a 10-position switch. My guess would be that the center pin on each side is the common like what's in those diagrams, and then there's probably one of each of the 4 corner positions shorted with each switch position. If you have a multimeter or low-current continuity tester it should be easy to confirm.

Not sure if it would have much use, it probably functions as a 4-way MUX, but I don't know how many times you'd want to route one signal up to 4 ways in a rocketry application. It could presumably function as an on/off switch, just with 3 different "off" positions. :)
 

adrian

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Guys,

I have 9 small Harmann 4 position rotary dip switches with 6 wires on back. They cam win a box of junk I bought. They are like: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/dip-sip-switches/3793799/

How od you wire one and with each position 0-3, what circuit does it turn on? Any use in rocketry?
There's a datasheet available from that page:
http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/1422/0900766b81422602.pdf

C is Common. Other pins are connected to that depending on the position of the switch, according to binary logic. So 0 is binary 0000; no connection is made. 1 is binary 0001; the 1 pin is connected to C. 3 is binary 0011, so the 1 and 2 pins are connected. The diagrams refer to the 10-way switch as that has the most complete range of connections, but I would imagine that the 4-way switch works the same way. It's the same 6-pin one-size-fits-all package, but as it only goes up to 3, I would expect that the 4 and 8 pins are never connected.
 
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