Quantcast

Drill Press Table

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

m85476585

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,652
Reaction score
1
I'm looking to build a table for my cheap drill press since it is such a pain to clamp things to the built-in table. I found this one, but it costs about 5 times what I paid for the entire drill press!
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10163
Most of the plans I found are a lot like that, and they all require a router, which I don't have, for the T-channels.

I have been clamping a piece of MDF with C-clamps then using quick clamps and/or nails (as a really quick fence) to hold the piece I am working with in place. I could bolt the MDF to the table, but I'm wondering if anyone here has come up with a better/more versatile solution.
 

sj_h1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2009
Messages
218
Reaction score
0
I'm looking to build a table for my cheap drill press since it is such a pain to clamp things to the built-in table. I found this one, but it costs about 5 times what I paid for the entire drill press!
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10163
Most of the plans I found are a lot like that, and they all require a router, which I don't have, for the T-channels.

I have been clamping a piece of MDF with C-clamps then using quick clamps and/or nails (as a really quick fence) to hold the piece I am working with in place. I could bolt the MDF to the table, but I'm wondering if anyone here has come up with a better/more versatile solution.
Maybe you looking in the wrong place but I just used and old 4 foot tall bookself for mine that I found at a garage sale for $3 and it works great. There are all sorts of side tables I see at garage sales all the time.
 

m85476585

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,652
Reaction score
1
I don't mean something to put the drill press on; I have a table for that. I mean something that will make it easier to align and clamp whatever I am working with, especially if I want to drill many holes the same distance from the edge. It would be kind of like the fence on a table saw.
 

sandman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
10,468
Reaction score
5
I don't have a drill press table as such.

I use a piece of MDF with some holes in it. Use machine screws and wing nuts to attach it to the drill press "bed" and make whatever kind of fence/jig I need with drywall screws and scrap pieces.

After a few year it gets a little ragged and I cut another piece of MDF and start again.

Costs about $2 or $3 for the wing nuts.

The scrap lumber is free.
 
Last edited:

troj

Wielder Of the Skillet Of Harsh Discipline, Potent
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
13,962
Reaction score
190
The Rockler table is fancy, and I bet it works really nicely. But it's bloody expensive.

Years ago, when my dad got his drill press, he made a table that bolts to the original table. It has a drawer in the front, in which he stores a few various bits, and it has a hole in the middle, to allow bits to penetrate down through, without perforating the table.

The top of the table has a lip to either side, to give him a clamping surface.

In addition, there's a fence that's bolt to the rear left corner, but free-floating on the right. This allows it to be pivoted out, and clamped in place via the overhang on the right side.

I don't have any pictures; I'd have to run over to their house to get some. If the description doesn't make sense, I can try to pop over in the next few days.

-Kevin
 

billspad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,625
Reaction score
2
I'm looking to build a table for my cheap drill press since it is such a pain to clamp things to the built-in table. I found this one, but it costs about 5 times what I paid for the entire drill press!
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10163
Most of the plans I found are a lot like that, and they all require a router, which I don't have, for the T-channels.

I have been clamping a piece of MDF with C-clamps then using quick clamps and/or nails (as a really quick fence) to hold the piece I am working with in place. I could bolt the MDF to the table, but I'm wondering if anyone here has come up with a better/more versatile solution.
You don't need a router to cut the slot for the T-channels. You can do it with a few passes with a circular saw. You could also cut a full size piece of MDF for the base, attach the T-channel to it and fill in on either side of the channel with more MDF.
 

Handeman

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
7,721
Reaction score
315
Location
Stafford, VA
I've never done "production" on my drill press so I never used anything but the stock table. I did build a vacuum box for the rotary sander I use in the drill press. This pic doesn't show it very well, but it's two plywood sheets with a box in the center. The vacuum tube is plugged into a hole on the side of the box and the rotary sander goes through a hole in the top. It works great and keeps the sawdust way down.

 

RimfireJim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
988
Reaction score
0
The table and fence I've been using for years on my drill press is fairly simple. All pieces are made of Melamine laminate particle board except as noted- not as sturdy as MDF, but I had it on hand and it works just fine.

The table is four pieces:
Piece 1: base w/holes for carriage bolts for attachment to original cast iron table. Extends from column to a few inches in front of original table, and about 2 feet wide. Wing nuts under original table for easy removal.
Pieces 2 & 3: top "wings" same depth as base, extending 1-2 inches beyond each side of base, ~4 inch gap between them in the center for insert. Attached to base with screws from below
Piece 4: center insert fits between wings and is replaceable/disposable. This is the piece that gets drilled into when the bit goes all the way through the workpiece. Needs to be same thickness as wings. Can make custom inserts for things like sanding drums. For drilling, I usually just use a scrap that is smaller than the gap, and move it around to a good spot.

Fence:
Glued up a stack from 3/4 inch plywood, three layers, I think, about 2 inches deep (front to back when on table) and an inch or so longer on each end than the width across the wings, for attachment of pinch blocks that clamp the fence to the wings. Added a facing to the fence that is 3 inches or so tall. Important thing is that this facing is square to the table when the fence is clamped down. Facing has a V cutout in the center for clearance for the drill chuck. The pinch blocks are keyed to the fence with a spline, and clamped with a carriage bolt and wingnut or plastic knob nut (on top, where it is easy to access).

In use, loosen the pinch blocks on both ends, move the fence to the approximate desired position, snug up the pinch block on one end, then fine tune the fence position by moving the other end before tightening the second pinch block. With the right amount of looseness/tightness, you can move it just the scosh necessary - I've never felt the need for any kind of microadjuster (unlike on my tablesaw).

I made the whole thing out of scraps except for the hardware. A quartersheet of material would be plenty. I like the smoother finish the Melamine has compared to MDF. One could seal MDF with polyurethane, or add plastic laminate to it.

If all this is as clear as mud, I'll try to take and post a picture or two.

-Jim
 
Top