A few new aerial pics

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Ray Dunakin

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I've just finished uploading a few new rocket aerial photos. Most of them are from a new payload design using an electronic timer. The timer was supplied by Daniel Franklin. Since it requires less physical space than the "servo and lever" mechanism in my previous payloads, I was able to fit the entire thing into a 2.6" airframe tube. This results in a more aerodynamic configuration than the previous boxy design.

https://albums.photo.epson.com/j/AlbumIndex?u=3009006&a=30098271&f=0

Eventually I'll post some construction photos of the payload.
 

teflonrocketry1

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Ray,

Looks like you have a nice launch site! Where were these pictures taken? Do you put a tracking transmitter in with the cameras when you lauch them in case the rocket drifts?

Bruce S. Levison, NAR #69055
 

Gus

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Ray,

Man what a gorgeous place to launch rockets. It's no wonder you're so into camera rockets. With similar altitude here I'd get pics of the high school football field, the tops of several fast food restauraunts, and numerous police cars headed my way. :D

Thanks for sharing the great pics.

I'd love to see the construction details when you get time.
 

wwattles

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I recognize the Plaster City site, but not the other two. It is indeed nice launching there.

WW
 

Ray Dunakin

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Originally posted by teflonrocketry1
Ray,

Looks like you have a nice launch site! Where were these pictures taken? Do you put a tracking transmitter in with the cameras when you lauch them in case the rocket drifts?
The badlands pics were taken in a remote region of the Imperial desert in So. Cal. I haven't used tracking transmitters, mainly due to the cost. But I usually put Pratt micro-beacons on them, which helps quite a bit. That particular area is a tough place to recover rockets from -- in March I lost an entire rocket and camera payload on a two-stage rlfight. The smoke obscured my view of the second stage and I lost sight of it. Heard the ejection charge pop but never saw a thing. Sad to say, I didn't have a micro-beacon on that one, since I'd just destroyed three of them in the crash of another rocket. Since then I've spent many, many hours searching for it, to no avail.

The last time I flew there, I had one rocket that ended up on a cliff. I couldn't get near it from above or below. Finally managed to knock it loose by throwing rocks at it -- luckily it survived with only minor scrapes.

BTW, I found a neat siren to use on larger rockets. It's a little alarm that is designed to go on sliding windows, with a magnetic switch that activates the siren when the window is opened. It's oval shaped, measuring 2.5"x1.25"x1" and produces a literally painful 120db shriek. I drilled a couple holes through one end of it, and threaded a lop of kevlar coard through it. Then I just attach it to the shockcord same as the Pratt micro-beacons.
 

OccamMD

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That's a swimming pool siren I believe, and man are they loud!!
 
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