Quantcast

TARC 2010 rules announced.

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

shreadvector

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
9,036
Reaction score
196
http://rocketcontest.org/rules_2010.cfm
http://rocketcontest.org/pdf/2010_rules.pdf
http://www.rocketcontest.org/
I strongly suggest getting in lots of basic practice flights. Test out compenents such as payload cushions and streamers before you test the entire rocket 'system'.

Note the new weight and power limit as well as the new way of scoring the time.

In my personal opinion, this years rules will result in TARC rockets that are more like Aerospace vehicles and less like plumbing or lumber projects. They will need to be light and strong. I would not be surprised if some teams do well with E motors.

-Fred Shecter NAR 20117
 

Swampworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
299
Reaction score
1
http://rocketcontest.org/rules_2010.cfm
http://rocketcontest.org/pdf/2010_rules.pdf
http://www.rocketcontest.org/

In my personal opinion, this years rules will result in TARC rockets that are more like Aerospace vehicles and less like plumbing or lumber projects.
-Fred Shecter NAR 20117
With the streamer recovery requirement, I am of the opinion that it will also result in a competition of payload protection ingenuity. Trying to slow down an egg falling 800+ feet with a streamer attached to it will not be easy.
 

shreadvector

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
9,036
Reaction score
196
With the streamer recovery requirement, I am of the opinion that it will also result in a competition of payload protection ingenuity. Trying to slow down an egg falling 800+ feet with a streamer attached to it will not be easy.
"... not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win..."
 

Adrian A

Sponsor
TRF Sponsor
TRF Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
2,296
Reaction score
263
Excellent rule improvements across the board. By giving all the durations between 40 and 45 seconds the same score, picking the winner isn't such a crap shoot as it has been, and it's not so dependent on human timers. Reducing the max impulse and eliminating pyro deployments will help keep it within an affordable range. But if someone wants to get creative with a non-pyro deployment based on an altimeter, that's still o.k.

I'm personally am also happy to see that they left the door open for altimeters other than the Perfectflite, so maybe if I get the Wren and Raven done soon I can get them approved for the 2010 TARC.
 

bobkrech

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
8,354
Reaction score
29
Adrian

Most teams, at least first time teams, will purchase several altimeters during the year. Since scoring is based on the altimeter, the precision and accuracy is important, and teams must be able to obtain a replacement quickly if their altimeter is damaged. While there are other low cost altimeter manufacturerss, I believe that a big reason for the current altimeter choice is the ability of Perfectflite to produce, stock and quickly deliver up to 1,000 identical altimeters for TARC in a competition year. I don't believe that many other altimeter companies have the financial resources to do this. I'd guess 1,000 altimeters requires an expenditure of ~$20K or so that won't be recovered until the altimeters are sold. That's a lot of money for a small part-time hobby company to have tied up for any period of time.

Bob
 

Adrian A

Sponsor
TRF Sponsor
TRF Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
2,296
Reaction score
263
Adrian

Most teams, at least first time teams, will purchase several altimeters during the year. Since scoring is based on the altimeter, the precision and accuracy is important, and teams must be able to obtain a replacement quickly if their altimeter is damaged. While there are other low cost altimeter manufacturerss, I believe that a big reason for the current altimeter choice is the ability of Perfectflite to produce, stock and quickly deliver up to 1,000 identical altimeters for TARC in a competition year. I don't believe that many other altimeter companies have the financial resources to do this. I'd guess 1,000 altimeters requires an expenditure of ~$20K or so that won't be recovered until the altimeters are sold. That's a lot of money for a small part-time hobby company to have tied up for any period of time.

Bob
Bob, I understand your point. That would be a problem for the Parrot, but the Wren and the Raven are designed specifically to be produced quickly in those kinds of quantities. I won't comment on the specifics of my production cost or financial resources, but I could definitely keep hundreds in stock while selling hundreds per week, if necessary. The main downside to entering that market is just the risk of failing to gain enough market share and sales volume to justify a large production run. I expect the Wren design will have advantages in price and performance (altitude repeatability), but I won't know for sure until I get production models built and tested.
 
Top