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HPR Waiver

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AKPilot

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Gary R., of AT, made the following statement under the Vendor section:

On a related topic, AeroTech would like to inform customers that as of 11/24/08 FAA ATC notification is no longer required for any AeroTech rocket kit using the recommended motors. FAA final rule 2007-27390 is also available for download from the "Regulatory Documents" page of the AeroTech Resource Library under the "Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)" heading.


I haven't run the numbers on all of his products (e.g. propellant, rockets, etc.) but, is that accurate - ATC notification is no longer required? I recognize that the "notification" rule has gone out the window, but are we not still required to obtain a waiver for such a combination as a Sumo on an "H" motor - which is one of the recommended motors?
 

WillMarchant

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The instruction say that the Sumo is 32 ounces without motor. And all the recommended motors have less than 125 g of propellant. Sounds like no waiver is required...
 

shreadvector

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Download and save this.

Print it. Print it 5 times and leave copies at home, at work, in your car and in your range box. Use the extra copy for a friend.

Read it.

Re-read it periodically.

Share it with others.

http://www.doug79.com/stuff/HPR_metric9c.pdf

Actual FAA regulations and weight limits for different classes of rockets (as defined by the FAA) are here:

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/tex...rgn=div5&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.3.15&idno=14

Gary R., of AT, made the following statement under the Vendor section:

On a related topic, AeroTech would like to inform customers that as of 11/24/08 FAA ATC notification is no longer required for any AeroTech rocket kit using the recommended motors. FAA final rule 2007-27390 is also available for download from the "Regulatory Documents" page of the AeroTech Resource Library under the "Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)" heading.


I haven't run the numbers on all of his products (e.g. propellant, rockets, etc.) but, is that accurate - ATC notification is no longer required? I recognize that the "notification" rule has gone out the window, but are we not still required to obtain a waiver for such a combination as a Sumo on an "H" motor - which is one of the recommended motors?
 

AKPilot

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Fred, I love your passion . . .

Seems that many "H" motors for the Sumo overstep the bounds when it comes to Total Impulse (H180W; 230 N-sec) and Prop. Wt. (H180W; 123.0g)
 

shreadvector

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Fred, I love your passion . . .
I hand out a *lot* of copies of that document at launches. And it's in the famous 'sticky thread'. I did not create it but it is one of the most useful things I've seen, so I want everyone to benefit from it.

Maybe we can get a multi-page comic-book version made, like the US Army does for training materials. Here is one I use at work and provided the link to to many, many coworkers (link is now dead, so we just use the PDF):


(attachments not working now, will try again later...)

(OK, the PDF is just under 600Kb so it will not attach and still no live link...). I can e-mail or attach it to an IM if you want it. It is a 2 page comic book tutorial on SMR codes. Very useful.
 
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shreadvector

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Fred, I love your passion . . .

Seems that many "H" motors for the Sumo overstep the bounds when it comes to Total Impulse (H180W; 230 N-sec) and Prop. Wt. (H180W; 123.0g)

The FAA does not care about the 62.5 gram weight limit or the total impulse. They only care about the 125 gram total installed propellant limit and the 1500 gram total lift off weight limit (and the rest of the safety related rules).
 

dcshrum

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The FAA does not care about the 62.5 gram weight limit or the total impulse. They only care about the 125 gram total installed propellant limit and the 1500 gram total lift off weight limit (and the rest of the safety related rules).

That is my read as well and I'm a CFII with far (pun intended) to many hours spent reading regulations with students.

So long as your rocket is a "(a) Class 1—Model Rocket means an amateur rocket that:"

(1) Uses no more than 125 grams (4.4 ounces) of propellant;
(2) Uses a slow-burning propellant;
(3) Is made of paper, wood, or breakable plastic;
(4) Contains no substantial metal parts; and
(5) Weighs no more than 1,500 grams (53 ounces), including the propellant.

You can pretty much do whatever so long as you don't endanger people or property.
 

clreynolds

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That is my read as well and I'm a CFII with far (pun intended) to many hours spent reading regulations with students.

So long as your rocket is a "(a) Class 1—Model Rocket means an amateur rocket that:"

(1) Uses no more than 125 grams (4.4 ounces) of propellant;
(2) Uses a slow-burning propellant;
(3) Is made of paper, wood, or breakable plastic;
(4) Contains no substantial metal parts; and
(5) Weighs no more than 1,500 grams (53 ounces), including the propellant.

You can pretty much do whatever so long as you don't endanger people or property.
You are almost right. In regards to just the FAA and notification, (the original question) those 5 restrictions are all you have to clear. But, other agencys also have a say. Fred is exactly correct. If the motor exceeds any of the high-power limits, NFPA (aka state law) also must be observed. Things like certification, safe launching distance, etc.
 

AKPilot

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NFPA is only applicable if your state, county, city, or township have adopted it.


BTW, I did get a chance to look it up this evening. Son of a gun, it is possible to launch a HPR Sumo without notifying the FAA! Shazam!:eyepop:
 
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