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Eggtimer Classic Assembled!

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Ccolvin968

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So I just finished my Eggtimer classic. It took me about two hours total with minimal soldering experience.
I opted for the 3v option, and installed the jumper there.
Dumb question time... do I solder a battery connector with wires to where I put the jumper?
Or do I connect the 3v battery elsewhere?
As far as I can tell, the spot on the short side is for the deployment channels and uses a 9v.
Thanks again!
 

cerving

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So I just finished my Eggtimer classic. It took me about two hours total with minimal soldering experience.
I opted for the 3v option, and installed the jumper there.
Dumb question time... do I solder a battery connector with wires to where I put the jumper?
Or do I connect the 3v battery elsewhere?
As far as I can tell, the spot on the short side is for the deployment channels and uses a 9v.
Thanks again!
The battery goes on the two B+ and B- terminals, the SW terminals are for your switch. If you're not going to use a mechanical switch (i.e. you're using an Eggtimer WiFi Switch or a Featherweight Magnetic Switch) then you can just jumper ther SW pads.

If you're doing deployments, you'll need to provide power to the BATA & BATB pairs of terminals. Check the Eggtimer User's Guide for more details.
 

Ccolvin968

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So... aside from the above notes, should I get an indicator light as soon as I plug in the battery and have SW jumpered?
I've done all my troubleshooting and can't get lights on.
I'm sure it's something that I did. If I can't get it to work soon I'll buy another one.
It's more than likely the quality of my soldering.
Each one is silver, but the board itself looks shiny in some spots, so I think I had the heat settings too high at one point. :-(
You solder, you learn.
You try again!
 

Ccolvin968

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Even under magnification, I don't see any solder points touching each other.
I did a number on the board on one spot where I think I used too much heat.
I'm wondering if I screwed up the board.
 

NateLowrie

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Another thing you can do is put a multimeter on the pin and trace the each pin to the closest via or pad. Put the other side of the multimeter on that closest pad/via and check the resistance.
 

Ccolvin968

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Even under magnification, I don't see any solder points touching each other.
I did a number on the board on one spot where I think I used too much heat.
I'm wondering if I screwed up the board.
 

KenRico

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you didn't attach the LED backwards did you ?

Kenny
 

Ccolvin968

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Nope, double checked that by touching the battery leads to each one where they were supposed to be.
Should a light come on as soon as I connect it to the battery?
 

Ccolvin968

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I'm glad I didn't give up on the Eggtimer Classic!
Cerving helped me out via email and it turned out to be an easy fix.
Trim my leads shorter and then scrub the flux off the board.
Works like a charm.
Now... gotta calm the dog down, and the dog woke the wife who is 35 weeks pregnant.
I think I have to call it a night. :) thanks again!!
I'll for sure be doing business with him again!
 

OverTheTop

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Just remember when you wash the board to cover any parts that have holes in them that might let your wash fluid (metho, I assume?) into them. Things like buzzers, switches and baro sensors are a bit fussy like that. You can cover those things with tape if you wish. Flush the board with lots of cleaner after a go with the brush. If you leave the contaminants on the board without giving a decent flush they just coat the board after the washing liquid evaporates. Need to carry the impurities off the PCA.

I always wash (using flux wash) and inspect after soldering. It has uncovered otherwise unseen problems!
 

Ccolvin968

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Didn't know there was a fluid to wash off the board with afterwords.
I'll be adding that to my "to buy" list.
I clearly have a lot to learn!
 

OverTheTop

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You can buy a proper "flux remover" for the quickest and best job, or you can use metho and a toothbrush if need be. Some of the newer fluxes are a bit difficult to do with metho, but it is better than nothing.

Wet the area with the fluid, wait 30 seconds, brush, and wash off with good quantity of clean fluid. Allow to dry.

fluxremover.jpg
Chemtronics is one of the reputable brands I like. The cans with brushes attached are a dream to use.

Don't forget usual chemical PPE, like safety glasses and gloves. Wash hands after use. Use in a well-ventilated area. Do not drink.

Also, keep your fingers off the boards when handling. Grab by the edges only where possible (virtually always). Make it a habit.
 

Ccolvin968

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But if it cleans a board, why can't I drink it to clean out my insides? ;)
 

KenRico

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Cerving & WarnerR helped me do my 1st quarks and wi-fi switches.

Although SMD based they actually were easier for me to assemble

I use a big pyrex dish , hacko soldering station, and the better LED helping hands from harbor freight for magnification

Kenny
 
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cerving

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Just remember, that solvent-based flux remover doesn't work on water-based "no-clean" fluxes like the one in the solder that I ship with the SMT kits. Don't use it with them. It's fine, though, for rosin-core solders, and I will repeat the advice that you should tape over the holes on the buzzer and (especially!) the baro sensor.
 

OverTheTop

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Just remember, that solvent-based flux remover doesn't work on water-based "no-clean" fluxes like the one in the solder that I ship with the SMT kits.
Thanks Chriis. Interesting. It is all I ever use at work for cleaning boards. Seems to work whether assembled with a no-clean or a clean flux (rosin or otherwise), professionally oven reflowed or or hand-assembled prototypes. Depends on the solvent and flux I guess, but that has not been my experience.
 

ksaves2

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But if it cleans a board, why can't I drink it to clean out my insides? ;)
4 ounces of castor oil is safer. Be forewarned of a big "blowout" and cramping for the rest of the day if one is below the age of 40. Kurt
 

OverTheTop

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4 ounces of castor oil is safer. Be forewarned of a big "blowout" and cramping for the rest of the day if one is below the age of 40.
Should this be in the "Frequency of Oil Change" thread? :)
 
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