Coronavirus: What questions do you have?

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BABAR

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Any documented re-infections? Meaning people who convincing HAD the disease (not just tested positive, but had convincing symptoms and perhaps multiple types of tests to exclude false positives) who clinically cleared the infection and at a later date developed a clinically recurrent infection documented by multiple tests again to exclude false positives?
 

Marc_G

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Uggh. My wife has flu symptoms and getting tested right now for Covid. No fever but typical other stuff. Fortunately IN has only 8% positivity rate recently. Is symptomatic minus fever a common situation with Covid?
 

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Someone has done it. They write a book on how to protect yourself against COVID and other Pandemics. "Pandemic Protection: Safe, Natural Ways to Prepare Your Immune System BEFORE You Need It" is the title. The best part is you can download it on Audible or Kindle or even go old school paperback. It might be worth a read at 3.5 stars.
 

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Update: Second day in a week with over 3400 in GA. This is a disaster in the making. The local ICUs are starting to fill. If the deaths up in 2 weeks, Remember where you heard it first.

That being said: “nothing to see here”. No reason to panic.
 

Louis Wu

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Not necessarily. There are hundreds of mutations to influenza year in and year out. The vaccine still helps. No need to panic yet.
Update: Second day in a week with over 3400 in GA. This is a disaster in the ..... it first.
That being said: “nothing to see here”. No reason to panic.
hmmm, you said ‘don’t panic’ twice already. Third time’s the charm?
 

Tech 68

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Hi Chuck,
Just ran across this and thought I'd share it with you.
A doctor in West Texas is having success with an inhaled asthma steroid called Budesonide.
Here's the video.
Thanks for all your hard work.
(Edit: The date of this video was May 21. It's probably old news to you folks in the medical community. I apologize if it is.)

 
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cwbullet

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Hi Chuck,
Just ran across this and thought I'd share it with you.
A doctor in West Texas is having success with an inhaled asthma steroid called Budesonide.
Here's the video.
Thanks for all your hard work.
(Edit: The date of this video was May 21. It's probably old news to you folks in the medical community. I apologize if it is.)

It might have some validity. I would like to see a large study though. It is kind of like testing a drug on one patient vs on Doctor’s patients. One is a larger group but nearly as susceptible to bias and 100% certain it does not have the power to be a valid study. Then again, all research starts somewhere.
 

Peartree

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I saw something this week about using invermectin as part of a treatment for COVID-19. I found this odd because my familiarity with invermectin is as a horse wormer. What is this drug normally used for in humans? And, how would it help fight against a viral infection?
 

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I saw something this week about using invermectin as part of a treatment for COVID-19. I found this odd because my familiarity with invermectin is as a horse wormer. What is this drug normally used for in humans? And, how would it help fight against a viral infection?
Worms and parasites. Yes humans get them too. In particular, Lice, Scabies, Onchocerciasis (river blindness worm), Strongyloidiasis (a roundworm), Ascariasis (a roundworm), cutaneous larva migrans (hookworm larvae)), filariasis (roundworm), Gnathostomiasis (roundworm) and Trichuriasis (whipworms). If that does not gross you out, have another drink from a creek.
 

Peartree

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Worms and parasites. Yes humans get them too. In particular, Lice, Scabies, Onchocerciasis (river blindness worm), Strongyloidiasis (a roundworm), Ascariasis (a roundworm), cutaneous larva migrans (hookworm larvae)), filariasis (roundworm), Gnathostomiasis (roundworm) and Trichuriasis (whipworms). If that does not gross you out, have another drink from a creek.
Makes sense. But how does wormer end up being helpful in fighting a virus?
 

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Bill S

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Worms and parasites. Yes humans get them too. In particular, Lice, Scabies, Onchocerciasis (river blindness worm), Strongyloidiasis (a roundworm), Ascariasis (a roundworm), cutaneous larva migrans (hookworm larvae)), filariasis (roundworm), Gnathostomiasis (roundworm) and Trichuriasis (whipworms). If that does not gross you out, have another drink from a creek.
I was actually put on Ivermectin for a parasitic infection, and it was apparently effective. Back in 2011 or so, I was treated for a newly discovered malaria-like infection call FL-1952/Protomyxoa (it was described as malaria trying to evolve into a parasitic worm), and it seems to have worked, whereas lots of old malaria drugs were ineffective. It had some side effects, mainly because I was on it for a while. The main side effect was memory issues; my memory was affected significantly, as well as my mood.

Its the same ingredient in Frontline for dogs.

I had no idea it might be useful in stopping viral replication though.
 

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I was actually put on Ivermectin for a parasitic infection, and it was apparently effective. Back in 2011 or so, I was treated for a newly discovered malaria-like infection call FL-1952/Protomyxoa (it was described as malaria trying to evolve into a parasitic worm), and it seems to have worked, whereas lots of old malaria drugs were ineffective. It had some side effects, mainly because I was on it for a while. The main side effect was memory issues; my memory was affected significantly, as well as my mood.

Its the same ingredient in Frontline for dogs.

I had no idea it might be useful in stopping viral replication though.
Not sure it helps reduce all viral replication but apparently it works for COVID.
 

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Update: 3400 more infections today. Today through Sunday will be the call moment in COVID poker. We will find where this increase is going.

Yesterday, a large number of hospitals started treating ICU patients with a new treatment. They began using a new dialysis filter to remove viral particles form dialysis needing COVID positive patients as they filter the blood. This sort of viral magnet could change treatment for the severely ill.
 

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The news is indicating that air conditioning might be increasing the spread of COVID. What is your take?
Anything is possible, and it depends on the technology. Modern AC in most health care facilities has a UV light or other technologies to "deactivate microbes, so it is unlikely in these locations. Many of large businesses have the same technology. Others use HEPA filters. Either should make this very unlikely. Hepat filters are not ideal, btu they do reduce the risk.
Window units might increase the spread. Air sampling shows that airborne transmission is happening as much as surface transmission, but there is no clear guidance on how to do this or how much AC plays a role. I recommend that you wear a mask in public and only buy takeout to avoid public exposure.

It is just nto worth the risk.
 

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I'll be stuck in a classroom with 33 adult sized high school seniors for 6 hrs a day. How do I protect them, myself, and my family from anything I might bring home?
They barely fit as it is, a window A/C unit, windows that barely open, and a building that is usually 15-20° hotter than outside.
 

gdiscenza

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Protect your family as best you can by decontaminating as soon as you get home, if possible. Since April, I've had a dedicated bathroom with shower just for decon. I get in the house, go directly to the bathroom where my wife has set out comfy "I'm not leaving the house" clothes, and shower. My work clothes go into a dedicated laundry bag. Once clean and dressed, I use antibacterial wipes on anything I touched before showering.
It is the same procedure my wife and I used when our preemie came home from the NICU, still medically fragile, during RSV season.

GD
 

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Protect your family as best you can by decontaminating as soon as you get home, if possible. Since April, I've had a dedicated bathroom with shower just for decon. I get in the house, go directly to the bathroom where my wife has set out comfy "I'm not leaving the house" clothes, and shower. My work clothes go into a dedicated laundry bag. Once clean and dressed, I use antibacterial wipes on anything I touched before showering.
It is the same procedure my wife and I used when our preemie came home from the NICU, still medically fragile, during RSV season.

GD
Great procedure. My only challenge would be obtaining antibacterial wipes. Rarely can get them in stores and never online, even this far into pandemic. Sigh.
 

Bill S

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Great procedure. My only challenge would be obtaining antibacterial wipes. Rarely can get them in stores and never online, even this far into pandemic. Sigh.
That is for sure. Back in April/early May, I could find some at Walmart (their brand, not the regular brands), and they were only allowing one per customer. Haven't seen any since then. I need them to tidy up litter boxes and cat vomits, hairballs, to say nothing of touching up doorknobs and lightswitches.
 

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I'll be stuck in a classroom with 33 adult sized high school seniors for 6 hrs a day. How do I protect them, myself, and my family from anything I might bring home?
They barely fit as it is, a window A/C unit, windows that barely open, and a building that is usually 15-20° hotter than outside.
I would do the same as if I were walking into a COVID Ward. Mask at all time by all people. Don’t touch anything and if you have to, clean you hands. When you get home, disrobe in your garage and bathe.
 

Cl(VII)

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Chuck, can you please point me to the best solid data that you are aware of regarding the reliability of rapid antigen testing? Most worried about false negative from asymptomatic/presymptomatic persons. We have developed a process for safely occupying our lab, but we are hung up on some contingency plans in case someone gets COVID. Now everyone who worked with them (in the building) would need to get a test before returning to work, but we don’t know if we should accept rapid antigen tests or insist on PCR.
 

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Chuck, can you please point me to the best solid data that you are aware of regarding the reliability of rapid antigen testing? Most worried about false negative from asymptomatic/presymptomatic persons. We have developed a process for safely occupying our lab, but we are hung up on some contingency plans in case someone gets COVID. Now everyone who worked with them (in the building) would need to get a test before returning to work, but we don’t know if we should accept rapid antigen tests or insist on PCR.
You are right to be concerned. Which brand of testing?


The sensitivity stinks for most of these tests.
 

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There are tests that are >99% selectively and >99% sensitivity. You need to do your research on the specs of any test.
I appreciate the criticism but would like to see your answer. Where is the answer since your are son knowledgeable? I do not think you are incorrect. I am not aware of a single COVID test that is >99% Sensitive and >99% Selective at this time. If you know of one, please go ahead and post it. If it is readily available, I have not heard of a single specific test that is specific enough to be usable.

I am more than will to lean so please share your answer.
 
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cwbullet

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Chuck, can you please point me to the best solid data that you are aware of regarding the reliability of rapid antigen testing? Most worried about false-negative from asymptomatic/presymptomatic persons. We have developed a process for safely occupying our lab, but we are hung up on some contingency plans in case someone gets COVID. Now everyone who worked with them (in the building) would need to get a test before returning to work, but we don’t know if we should accept rapid antigen tests or insist on PCR.
I spend a couple of hours last night. I share your concerns. I posted one article that illustrates the concern. Antigen tests are widely variable. What test equipment and test are you looking to purchase or do you own?

I will ask my SMEs today so see if there is an answer. The incubation period is 4-7 days so that is when people should get symptomatic. What you are asking for is a rule-out test and I am not aware of a good one. I would insist on a PCR. You want specificity to confirm infections. The bottom line is that the best rule out infection is 14 days of quarantine. Even that misses the asymptomatic.

If you are looking for an option, there is one antigen test that may soon be readily available that gets to 80% sensitivity: Sofia 2 SARS Antigen FIA. It was announced in May. I am not sure on availability.
 
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heada

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I appreciate the criticism but would like to see your answer. Where is the answer since your are son knowledgeable? I do not think you are incorrect. I am not aware of a single COVID test that is >99% Sensitive and >99% Selective at this time. If you know of one, please go ahead and post it. If it is readily available, I have not heard of a single specific test that is specific enough to be usable.

I am more than will to lean so please share your answer.
99.8% specific and 100% selective

Generally available since mid-May


I'm sure there are others out there but this is one that I know of.
 

BABAR

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99.8% specific and 100% selective

Generally available since mid-May


I'm sure there are others out there but this is one that I know of.
From your site

Quote

Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 detected antibodies with 100% sensitivity in samples taken 14 days after a PCR-confirmed infection.

Unquote


Great sensitivity for individuals who are at least 14 days post infection (and therefore likely even more days after exposure, as it takes at least a few days to get infected and probably a few more to develop antibodies.) So there is a potential at least 14 day window where a patient may get a false negative, I.e., test negative and actually be developing or actively infected AND infectious.

It’s a great test to prove whether or not you HAD the virus 14 days ago. A negative test doesn’t tell you whether you have it NOW.
 

heada

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From your site

Quote

Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 detected antibodies with 100% sensitivity in samples taken 14 days after a PCR-confirmed infection.

Unquote


Great sensitivity for individuals who are at least 14 days post infection (and therefore likely even more days after exposure, as it takes at least a few days to get infected and probably a few more to develop antibodies.) So there is a potential at least 14 day window where a patient may get a false negative, I.e., test negative and actually be developing or actively infected AND infectious.

It’s a great test to prove whether or not you HAD the virus 14 days ago. A negative test doesn’t tell you whether you have it NOW.
The question was about antigen tests. I'm not aware of any antigen test for current infections. For those, you must go with full PCR for the active virus.

I'm not advocating or promoting any test/product over any other. There are a crap-ton of really bad tests out there since the FDA opened the emergency approval flood gates. I'm only saying that among those really bad tests are some good ones. Roche makes one. I believe Abbott makes another (99.9% specific/100% selective after 17 days). I'd highly recommend that both as providers and consumers, that we research any test that is given/offered since not all tests are equal.

edit: added details about the Abbott test
 
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