Quantcast

Camera rocket

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Okay, let’s see if we can make a rocket that is a stable platform on the way up AND the way down.

Centering rings, inside hole for 24 mm mount, used a 20mm hole saw, will sand to fit
image.jpg
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Cut tube to 9” (relying on some base drag)

Will put in a 24mm mount, although plan at least on initial flights to go with adapter for 18mm.

4 fins already papered
image.jpg
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Inner hole sander
image.jpg
image.jpg
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
image.jpg
image.jpg
Marks need to be right

I tried Estes marker and door jam, still not consistently straight.

I used the same marks and true multiple lines, you can see how thick the result was because there was a little bit of waggle with both the door jam and the Estes guide. For a standard sport rocket, not significant (and we will see if it helps here).

Figured the Payload Bay markers will be better by far.

The red tape arrow marks the Payload Bay mark

Btw, the sliding piece on the Estes marking guide was NOT in the way when I used it, just including it in photo for illustration

Time will tell
image.jpg
image.jpg


Thanks @jadebox
 

Sooner Boomer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2011
Messages
2,990
Reaction score
609
Somewhat like a stretched Fat Boy? (w/24mm) Are you using through-the-wall construction?
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Kind of my own version. I found four 1/16 fins that looked like they would work, so I papered them.

These is a reason for the big diameter, it will have three attachment points that hopefully will reduce rocket sway.


Cheaters.

These are fin root length (6 cm) x 1/16” x 1/16” that are easy to place on the lines, and will proved attachment points and hopefully optimal alignment.

With the exception of my interceptor E i have yet to do through the wall fins. I am putting in a 24 mm motor mount, although I will likely adapt down to 18 mm. As so many have said, it’s always easier to start with a big mount and go small than the contrary

Nose cone in place just to support the inside.
image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg


.
image.jpg
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
image.jpg
Shroud line supports on forward centering rings (recycled key cards)
image.jpg
 
Last edited:

K'Tesh

OpenRocket Chuck Norris
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Messages
14,503
Reaction score
1,081
I wonder if you were to build a rocket that is large enough (and powerful enough) to have an onboard gyroscope, would that give a stable camera platform on the up and down?
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Complicated stringing up.

Three shock cords off the front, hopefully will help to hang steady from chute.

One shock cord out the tail, nose cone will be independent of the chute shrouds.
image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
 

GlenP

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2014
Messages
2,143
Reaction score
451
I guess you just want to get the rocket to come down smoothly and not spin like crazy so you get a good stable camera during the descent. This will be interesting to see how that works. Looks promising so far!

I have not tried, but thought that maybe a small streamer on a long external shock cord from the tip of one fin would help keep the rocket from spinning around under a single chute. Kind of like a tail on a kite. The main chute does all the heavy lifting but the streamer just keeps the rocket oriented.
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
I guess you just want to get the rocket to come down smoothly and not spin like crazy so you get a good stable camera during the descent. This will be interesting to see how that works. Looks promising so far!

I have not tried, but thought that maybe a small streamer on a long external shock cord from the tip of one fin would help keep the rocket from spinning around under a single chute. Kind of like a tail on a kite. The main chute does all the heavy lifting but the streamer just keeps the rocket oriented.
Interesting idea.

I will see how this one flies as is, but could easily add that.
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
Two wraps of dental floss around the outside or the tube, one forward and one after of where the external shock cord parts come out. I don’t think zipper is likely anyway, as internally the lines extend downward, through the edges of the forward centering ring (reinforced with pieces of plastic key card) , then through the rear centering ring to loop around the motor mount.
 

Attachments

Bruce

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
129
Reaction score
17
I wonder if you were to build a rocket that is large enough (and powerful enough) to have an onboard gyroscope, would that give a stable camera platform on the up and down?

This sounds like a great project!

I remember the demonstration where the professor would sit in a swivel chair while holding a spinning bicycle wheel in front. When the prof tilted the wheel to one side the gyroscopic force from the spinning bicycle wheel would rotate him one way in the swivel chair. When he tilted the wheel to the other side, the force would reverse his rotation on the swivel chair.

Couldn't a similar idea be applied to a rocket? If the onboard gyro sensed the rocket starting to spin one direction, the flight computer would command a servo to tilt the onboard spinning flywheel to stop the spinning.

Would this work? Or are there other, easier ways to absolutely stop a rocket from spinning?
 

BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
TRF Lifetime Supporter
TRF Supporter
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
7,270
Reaction score
2,234
This sounds like a great project!

I remember the demonstration where the professor would sit in a swivel chair while holding a spinning bicycle wheel in front. When the prof tilted the wheel to one side the gyroscopic force from the spinning bicycle wheel would rotate him one way in the swivel chair. When he tilted the wheel to the other side, the force would reverse his rotation on the swivel chair.

Couldn't a similar idea be applied to a rocket? If the onboard gyro sensed the rocket starting to spin one direction, the flight computer would command a servo to tilt the onboard spinning flywheel to stop the spinning.

Would this work? Or are there other, easier ways to absolutely stop a rocket from spinning?
Great thought.

I believe gyros would work, but probably not practical for LPR (or my budget!)
 

K'Tesh

OpenRocket Chuck Norris
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 27, 2013
Messages
14,503
Reaction score
1,081
How much would a fidget spinner cost?
Then figure out a way to rig it to a motor that can spin it up, and disengage to allow it to spin freely... It's the last part that defeats my knowledge base.
 
Top