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Callisto & Avionics?

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svickrey

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I (just returning to the hobby) Am still undecided
as to what rocket to order. I want a sturdy kit like PML's Callisto.
One that I can L1 with. The reason I'm not sure about this rocket is the piston ejection system. I'm not sure that in the future I will be able to add avionics to it.
I want to be sure I can add instruments to this rocket.
 

Ryan S.

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I am not familiar with the Piston system; however, I would think it would be possible to add electronics to it. The main charge will still seperate the body tubes and if you are worried about it jamming the piston use motor ejection for the drogue.

The only other problem I would thing you may run into would be space, but as I remember it the callisto is a pretty long rocket and I have been able to shove some 'chutes in small places so I doubt you will have problem
 

dluders

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I have a PML Callisto, and it flies great. If you build it stock, there is no room for on-board avionics. However, PML sells an "Intellicone" to house altimeters and other avionics. On the outside, the Intellicones are the same size as the normal PML 2.1" plastic nosecones. However, on the inside is a PML tube with a plywood cap on the end. You can easily fit most electronics inside this ~6"-long inner tube.

You could also cut the Callisto's Quantum tubing in two, so that there is a small payload bay in the top. The long, bottom portion of the tube could remain to house the parachute & piston ejection system. The upper part would need a coupler and bulkhead to house the electronics. Attach your shock cord to a screw-eye epoxied into the base of the bulkhead.

Personally, I would go with the Intellicone. With one 2.1" Intellicone, you can put electronics onto many PML kits without cutting the body tube.

If you use an altimeter, be sure to drill a small hole through the base of the Intellicone's "shoulder" so that the altimeter can "feel" the air pressure outside.
 

svickrey

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Thank you Great Replys!

I hadn't even thought of that unused space in the nose cone.
This not only is a great ballasting place. It's ideal for a pitot tube.

I love this forum!
 

HeadHunter

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I found this on the PML site.

CPR3000

What is CPR? CPR is an altimeter based, two step parachute deployment system. Using a dual-deployment altimeter, the first chute (a small drogue) is deployed at apogee allowing for a fast but controlled descent. At approximately 400/800 feet, (user selectable) the altimeter fires a second charge deploying the main chute allowing for a soft landing.

The altimeter is centrally located in a special compartment within the main airframe. The drogue chute is ejected from a split-point in the airframe just above the fin/motor section while the main is ejected at the nose cone. Both chutes are deployed using our exclusive Piston Ejection System.

Just two simple yet strong anodized aluminum parts hold the altimeter and ejection charge cylinders as a self contained unit. Prep the assembly on a table, slip it into your rocket, screw the airframes together, and launch. Once assembled, the altimeter/charge cylinder assembly can be easily moved to another CPR3000 rocket, making it easy (and cost-effective, since you only need one altimeter) to fly CPR3000.

And this about the Callisto
Retrofit for Callisto (at bottom of page):D
 

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