Whats Your Hot Job ???

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Andy Greene

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Name your Hot Job -
If your in it 5 days a week and deal with it- lets hear it.
Me "cable guy" , in attics / under houses / 20+ft in the air on a ladder on the utility lines / burying lines under sidewalks, ect....
😎

Next -
Btw, I live in Tampa , here was todays heat index.
 

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PayLoad

I don't do spirals
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I import Japanese on-road & military vehicles

EDIT/UPDATE - Sorry, I took the word "HOT" to mean a job you have that you think is the best in the world
 
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Sandy H.

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This is a thermal image of one of us (not me, but similar job at times) after working on a 400# part that was in the range of 1000-1500 degF.

The suit outer temps get to around 140F, the gloves outer temp closer to 170F. The inner temps are in the 100-130F range from the heat source, but putting on that much stuff gets you to 'sweating like a dog from top to bottom' in about 2 minutes and the process runs about 15 min. People get rotated in and out cycle to cycle vs running the process all day.

Kinda miserable at times during the summer.

Sandy.
 

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dr wogz

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those rotisserie ovens you see at the back of Costco, Sam's Club, BJ's Walmart..

I know them intimately, having drawn many a part and help manage the inventory flow of their assembly.. With a swoosh of my mouse, i can fly thru the oven virtually, turning on & off parts as I need to get my new / revised part to fit. I will then constrain it, and add to the assembly the hardware to secure it in place. I then close off the ECO, and release the part dwg, and revise the various tables & spreadsheets as all Engineers do when developing & maintaining existing & new equipment..

And the whole RnD department smells like roast chicken..
 

Buzzard

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Flightline at Mather AFB, CA in '74-75 and Carswell AFB, TX '83-85. Temps over a 100, dark colored B-52G and H models. IMU Calibration and/or Missile checkout (System Integration Tests). One portable AC unit per aircraft. AC went to the missile system. Most of my career was otherwise in office postitions. One exception GLCM training in southern Arizona, in the summer, on dispersal training...

Chas
 

NateB

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What's an office? My first job was working for my grandpa at his tennis club. I helped build and maintain the clay tennis courts, rolled and brushed them in the morning, and mowed and trimmed the grass. In my younger years I have also worked Summer jobs at an outdoor music venue and as a lifeguard at an amusement park. Those weren't too bad because I could wear shorts and short sleeves.

I have spent my adult career in the Fire and EMS service. Turnout gear for interior firefighting gets hot as soon as you put it on and before you even get near the fire. I'm a flight medic now, so we have to wear a nomex flight suit, helmet, and whatever PPE is appropriate for our patient. The aircraft has AC, but it just barely takes the edge off the heat. Cabin temperatures in the Summer are often around 90 degrees, sometimes more on a hot day.

I have also set up and shot professional firework displays part time in the Summer. There is plenty of heat and humidity setting the shows up, plus more PPE to fire the show.

Hydration is important. During this time of the year, I need to drink at least a gallon of water a day. Often more depending on the day and how hard we end up working outdoors.
 

teepot

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When I was 22 [79] I ran a compound saw at at roofing truss company. This was in Florida and it was outside. 90* and 90% humidity. I had a very dark tan, almost white blonde hair and muscles. I would like to have that body back. The last job I had before I retired was as a firearms instructor. This was in Nevada. The range wasn't air conditioned because we had large exhaust fans to pull the smoke out. We did have a swamp cooler but all that did was raise the humidity. So 115 out side and 100 inside with a lot of moisture. We took turns in the range so nobody got heat stroke.
 

Kelly

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Not my job, but I used to work for a glass making company, and I was in the factories a lot. There were guys that operated the line, and stood near where molten glass - at many hundreds of degrees C - was coming out of the furnace and being formed. I think the temperature at their station was about 140°F. They stood all day and worked at that temp. I could stand there for about 30 seconds before I had to flee.
 

Five

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The trailers at the UPS hubs can get very hot. You get bruised up and cut up every day lifting boxes.
But having 20+ years seniority enables me to stay inside air conditioning and help customers who come in to the customer counter, I also call customers to address correct their packages. Six days a week.
 

OverTheTop

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I develop spectrometers. The office is nicely airconditioned, as are most labs. The heat comes in where the plasma is generated by a 2kW 27MHz RF system. 10000K, so about twice the surface temperature of the sun, about the size of your thumb and emitting lots of light, including UV.

We also have a graphite tube furnace for our atomic absorption instruments. They can get up to 3000K or so. About 20ul (microlitres) of sample is dropped into that for analysis.
 
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teepot

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The trailers at the UPS hubs can get very hot. You get bruised up and cut up every day lifting boxes.
But having 20+ years seniority enables me to stay inside air conditioning and help customers who come in to the customer counter, I also call customers to address correct their packages. Six days a week.
6 days a week! That's not normal any more. No wonder I have never seen you at a launch.
 

hobie1dog

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Spent most of my adult life in Commercial HVAC/Refrigeration. and usually on the heat producing side. All day on an Asphalt roof in the summer, inside unconditioned Mechanical rooms. I hated it really bad, and have deep regret for ever getting into it. I totally ruined my life and will never get over it. There's no do-over either. Disabled (had fall #40 about 30 minutes ago)
 
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Sooner Boomer

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I used to be a welder (gas, mig, tig). Under the leathers and helmet, it can get quite hot. The building we were in didn't help, either. In the summer, it got so hot the fans in the heaters up on the wall would turn on. Things that helped were having short hair, and having a water hose nearby. If it got too bad, I could soak my head and cool off. I'd be better off today, having lost a bunch of weight.
 

Mushtang

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While in college I worked summers (and winters) for a friend's dad's sprinkler piping business, installing fire protection sprinkler pipes in new construction buildings.

A typical Georgia summer day can get in the high 90s, working in a building before the AC is installed it can get pretty roasting, especially on ladders up where the hottest air rises.

Fortunately my job was running materials to the guys up on the ladders so I didn't have to deal with that extra heat, but I'd still go through gallons of water each day to replace the sweat.

After college it's been nearly 30 years working in air conditioned offices at a computer.
 

Antares JS

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Is that something related to petrochemical?
I guess you could say that insofar as RP-1 is a petrochemical.

It's a bit more obvious in the actual high-res picture my profile picture is taken from but looking at my profile picture version, even the bigger version if you go to my profile page, it's really less clear than it should be if I'm going to play a guessing game with it.

The white thing next to my head is the Antares rocket. I'm an engineer at Wallops.
 

RobertH3

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Electronics tech in a glass plant making beer bottles. Constant heat strain got me kidney stones. I don't recommend the glass industry to anyone, pay is very high due to horrifying working conditions, management is stuck in 1960, injuries were the highest I have ever seen, active military included. Unbelievable. Walking out of the computer room onto production floor was 125 in the summer. On the catwalks above the glass forming machines 150+ and up depending upon location.

Cheers / Robert
 

Blast it Tom!

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I guess you could say that insofar as RP-1 is a petrochemical.

It's a bit more obvious in the actual high-res picture my profile picture is taken from but looking at my profile picture version, even the bigger version if you go to my profile page, it's really less clear than it should be if I'm going to play a guessing game with it.

The white thing next to my head is the Antares rocket. I'm an engineer at Wallops.
Finally! I've always wondered! Good on you!

I was a wannabe pilot/astronaut/aerospace engineer before I fouled the works up and ended up in a steel mill for 10 years. I eventually "froze" (i.e refused a move-up on the pay scale) becasue it only meant another 10 cents an hour to be on all day shoveling the "bench", versus half a day on top of the coke ovens pulling and replacing lids on the charging holes. 120°-140°F in the summer, delightful in the winter and you split your day with another lidman. I eventually requested a full-face respirator versus safety glasses, a drop-down face shield, and a half-face respirator as it was much more efficient and 100% effective at keeping the fine "coke breeze" dust out of my eyes.

When they shut the mill down I was able to finish my degree and am about to retire from 31 years of consulting and (lately) manufacturing in power generation and large motors and a few other odd power projects.
 
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Antares JS

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Very cool! Were you present for the BB XII launch earlier this summer?
Yes, I've been around for a number of sounding rocket launches by this point. They launch them just a little ways down the shore from the building where I work. We also pass by the sounding rocket pads rolling Antares to 0A. I was on night shift for a recent night-launched one and got to watch it from just outside the building. That was super cool.
 

Donnager

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I do HVAC work in paper mills, probably the most inhospitable manufacturing areas you can imagine.

Operating floor temperatures usually run around 120-140F.

Roof truss ventilation work is closer to 200F.

Edit: Although, I used to work in a sulfuric acid plant where they'd go into a 400-600F catalyst bed and screen the catalyst with some fire retardant suits with breathing apparatus and cooling. Never personally had the privilege, though.
 

Blast it Tom!

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I do HVAC work in paper mills, probably the most inhospitable manufacturing areas you can imagine.

Operating floor temperatures usually run around 120-140F.

Roof truss ventilation work is closer to 200F.

Edit: Although, I used to work in a sulfuric acid plant where they'd go into a 400-600F catalyst bed and screen the catalyst with some fire retardant suits with breathing apparatus and cooling. Never personally had the privilege, though.
Smelly, too! Been to several... Glad I don't have your job!
 

tab28682

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I am very glad to have mostly worked indoors in the Aerospace industry! I did spend a few months here and there in the desert, in the summer, doing UAV flight tests at various locations, plus a few months here and there working in unheated and un-airconditioned warehouses.

Great respect for all the hard working folks that brave high temps doing their jobs.
 

SILVERFOX

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The white thing next to my head is the Antares rocket. I'm an engineer at Wallops.

I have followed the Antares program closely. Watched the October 2014 failure from the end of Arbuckle Neck Rd and was pretty shook up having witnessed it.
You folks have certainly done a fine job turning things around with the airframe and power plant upgrades. Antares is a stout, very capable bird now.
 

Antares JS

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I have followed the Antares program closely. Watched the October 2014 failure from the end of Arbuckle Neck Rd and was pretty shook up having witnessed it.
You folks have certainly done a fine job turning things around with the airframe and power plant upgrades. Antares is a stout, very capable bird now.
I wasn't here yet when Orb-3 happened, but I've overseen a bunch of improvements to the vehicle as we've moved into the 230+ configuration. More improvements are on their way, too.
 
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