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Lonestar

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Check this out.
Very well made, metal, tight tolerances, heavy duty, non-magnetic nose, 4 digit xxxed out serial number...
Its heavy at 5.1 lbs. 12 small screws attach the nose to the tail. I think the nose is not removable from its portion of the mid-section. The nose is non-magnetic while the mid-section and tail are lightly magnetic. The mid-section can carry a payload. It has some type of used chemical remains. The red plug plugs a non threaded hole. The 3 pin connector and red hole are at the very bottom of the mid section. The mid-section feeds downward into bottom section through a very small machined slit running the perimeter circumference of the interior lining.
http://i.imgur.com/QmDIhS6.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/o1NK0do.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/zOkYr1L.jpg The hole at the top doesnt go through .Its about 1/2 inch deep and had a bolt threaded in with a nut on the bolt.

 
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Lonestar

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More..


http://imgur.com/duG8PUN Stamped out serial number?
http://i.imgur.com/Pe4qft2.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/6mJDWiG.jpg


http://imgur.com/nvyfhyJ Bottom...small slit at the very top, runs around the inner circumference allowing an opening to mid-section


middle to bottom showing chemical residue and spent casing?


http://i.imgur.com/mDYuQxt.jpg middle to top show a slightly hollow nose.

Im leaning away from the APFSDS (armor piercing fin stabilizing discarding sabot) round. I just looks too old to be one and the weight and shape aren't right.
Im leaning away from the APFSDS (armor piercing fin stabilizing discarding sabot) round. I just looks too old to be one and the weight and shape aren't right.

Pre 1960 were people making their own hobby rockets out of steel?
Possibly this piece would have came down on a parachute and the back half would have been separated at the apex of the flight. It would have been at least twice as long and considering the material, it would have stood at least 3 foot tall in order to have enough propellant to lift it up. Thoughts on that?


Pre 1960 were people making their own hobby rockets out of steel?
Possibly this piece would have came down on a parachute and the back half would have been separated at the apex of the flight. It would have been at least twice as long and considering the material, it would have stood at least 3 foot tall in order to have enough propellant to lift it up. Thoughts on that?
 
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dave carver

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Boosted dart, not a rocket per say. Super Loki Dart comes to mind. MClark would know, he worked for the company that made them.
 

fyrwrxz

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My first instinct was a aerodynamic model for a wind tunnel test, but the corrosion in the cavity looks chemical in nature and evidence of a burst disc makes me think of a possible munitions test round where the deployed charge could have been initiated by negative g's following impact and setting off a marker of some sort. Our desert out here is littered with a bunch of practice 'flour bombs' used to teach young aviators bombing skills during WW2. It is, however, EXTREMELY COOL!
* I think Dave tagged it correctly-i type slow-LOL!)
 
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hornet driver

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I'm gonna take a wag at this and guess it's a sabot anti tank round. Likely a test or practice round.
 

TopRamen

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Oh my! May I come find things with you?
From my point of view, and since the weight seems to be about what I would figure an empty and intact....

Actually, I don't think we are allowed to to discuss all metal anything here.
Maybe telling ME where you found it can help your curiousity, as I will gladly research it for you.
Had I have made it, I would have made it in th every late 30's, and it would have been a designt to use the new cored solid fuel propellants, yet at the size it is, it would have been an incendiery projectile deployed from a rocket of greater girth, and with the fixed fins, only required to provide an ample saturation in conjunction with dozens of cousins. Go back where you found it and look for more, I would love to own a specimen. I can't afford a rare novelty, but if you find yourself with the rest of them, maybe you can cut me a deal or barter for just one.
The lack of erosion to the surface of the round indicates that it is not likely that era of "Just Aluminum or Pot Metal" so you may want to run a Geiger over it before handling it to much. Even hobbyists have had access to everything throughout the years, and big dreams of making cool stuff.
It could be anything, but I'de like it if you grow bored with it.
 

MaxQ

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The lack of erosion to the surface of the round indicates that it is not likely that era of "Just Aluminum or Pot Metal" so you may want to run a Geiger over it before handling it to much..
You thinking depleted uranium round?



 
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TopRamen

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My first instinct was a aerodynamic model for a wind tunnel test, but the corrosion in the cavity looks chemical in nature and evidence of a burst disc makes me think of a possible munitions test round where the deployed charge could have been initiated by negative g's following impact and setting off a marker of some sort. Our desert out here is littered with a bunch of practice 'flour bombs' used to teach young aviators bombing skills during WW2. It is, however, EXTREMELY COOL!
* I think Dave tagged it correctly-i type slow-LOL!)
To many NACA Report fans here! Thankfully!
:lol::bangbang:It is obviously not an Estes or Centuri product!
 

Lonestar

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Thanks, I got it from a random flea market last week. Unfortunately, the guy had no info at all about it. It certainly looks to have some age to it and the serial numbers make it more mysterious but Im still having a hard time pinning this one down. Ive searched through hundreds of images and still cant find a size and weight match. From rocket kits to APFSDS rounds and everything in between.
 

Lonestar

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The problem with it being an APFSDS round is the shape is off and the weight is off.
A live round was made of Depleted Uranium and test rounds were Tungsten. This is just stainless nose and steel body with tiny rivets holding the tailfins on. They are very tight but not machined like you'd find on the APFSDS rounds.
 

dave carver

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I really hope MClark sees this, if it's a boosted dart then maybe the corrosion is from a tracking flare. I did look up a Super Loki, this is shorter than the dart shown.

Loki-dart_display.jpg
 

hornet driver

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The problem with it being an APFSDS round is the shape is off and the weight is off.
A live round was made of Depleted Uranium and test rounds were Tungsten. This is just stainless nose and steel body with tiny rivets holding the tailfins on. They are very tight but not machined like you'd find on the APFSDS rounds.
OK , never mind!
 

TopRamen

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You thinking depleted uranium round?
No, I'm familiar with those, and they are not rocket propelled, but back in the day, they did not know the properties of things, or dangers, so they just mixed everything with everything and shot it at stuff.
The projectile looks like authentic "Atomic Age" goods, so there is no telling if it is anything dangerous at all, but isn't safety always the very first thing?
 

Lonestar

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I have handled tungsten and its VERY dense.
This "rocket" Ive got is heavy but I do think it would be heavier if tungsten were involved. I cant separate the nose from the body to do any density tests so Im going off my gut feeling that its stainless steel.
 
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Lonestar

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Theres no reason to lock this thread. It is a random unknown rocket and I have been refererred to the National Association of Rocketry to determine if it is simply a pre 1960s hobby rocket. Possibly this piece could have come down on a parachute and the back half would have been seperated at the apex of the flight. It would have been twice as long, considering the material, to have enough propellant to lift it up. You know what they say... "They dont make em like they used too,"
A skilled machinist could have made this in his off time.
 
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TopRamen

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Theres no reason to lock this thread. It is a random unknown rocket and I have been refererred to the National Rocket Association to determine if it is simply a pre 1960s hobby rocket. Possibly this piece could have come down on a parachute and the back half would have been seperated at the apex of the flight. It would have been twice as long, considering the material, to have enough propellant to lift it up.
I agree, and am quite curious too. Mayhaps there is a machinist back in the day with his own blend of metals that would stand up to corrosion and look just like the thing you have, and the parts would still slide apart like that.
I'm just thinking it is more like an incendiary bomblet, and I don't know what's up with the serial numbering. A Cloud Seeding experiment perhaps?
I can't tell you what I think it might be, and if you really want to know, I suggest googling it, as you don't want the speculation thread locked or deleted.
I do hope it is something very cool, like Project Pluto cool, but I really have no Idea.
Maybe do a model of it and see if it flies better when boosted with a motor or dropped from a roof. Compare the two trajectories to known ordnance and rockets and determine which it most resembles, but you have to do lots of tests to find the highest attainable altitude or the most precision drop.

Damn it! I so freeking curious right now, and really don't wan't to go down the research rabbit hole!
 

TopRamen

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To be honest, the styling looks almost ornamental and not functional at all.
Perhaps the holes are not sampling holes, but rather where more easily rust-able metal has simply wept away.
Perhaps the entire thing was some kids high-school art project or a Homer Hickam original?
Now that would be really cool!
Without your location, we really should not bother to speculate any further until one of the real rocket scientists shows up and tells us.
I know I'll feel stupid when the true answer is had, but that's ok.
It could be a one-off Hood Ornament for all we know, with no flight potential at all.
Since we know nothing, we must allow for everything.:wink:
 

TopRamen

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Let's go ahead and arbitrarily name it for fun!
I'm calling it the "Crossfire ISM"
 

Lonestar

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Im in San Antonio.
The main cluster of holes are just for screws I took out to separate. Interesting to note that they were all clocked. There are six sets of screws and each set is clocked to match its partner. As you spin the rocket the clocking changes in a clockwise fashion for each set until it resets at horizontal.:surprised:
Seems a little time consuming and unnecessary but very cool.
 

dave carver

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The 'x'd out serial number is a clue and leads me to believe it's no hobby time project. Big business or Government is my best guess. We got some real rocket people here, I bet we know just what it is by tomorrow.
 

Lowpuller

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I don't know what it is but I want to buy it! Seriously, PM me if you will consider selling it.
 

Lowpuller

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Was this ruled out as being a sabot? Looks like the right guess to me.
 

dave carver

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Was this ruled out as being a sabot? Looks like the right guess to me.

It's the crusty stuff inside that has me puzzled, it doesn't look like there was a nozzle of any sort which is what leads me to believe that a flare or maybe a base-bleed was used. The sabot round shown earlier seems to show a base-bleed but even it is quite a bit longer.

Can't wait for the correct answer :)
 
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K'Tesh

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I wonder what happened to my post... Since it went missing, I'll post again...

No matter what it is, it's a COOL find! :cool:
 

GregGleason

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Hmmmmm ...

It's interesting. The nose cone looks like a VK. If it is a VK, then it was designed with aerodynamics in mind, which leads me to think that this was some aero test model for wind tunnels. But aero test models are usually highly machined stainless steel. This looks like a "brute force" test article like something the Soviet's may have done, but I'm just grasping at straws. Regardless, that looks like nothing I've seen in the real world with a possible exception of a stretched V-2 (which had an ogive nose cone).

I bet whatever it is it has an interesting history.

Greg
 
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