Spy Plane Still Up There

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georgegassaway

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A record for that vehicle, whatever the heck it's doing.

But the record for time in space is Vanguard 1, at 59 years and counting. Launched March 17, 1958, and likely to be up for another 180 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanguard_1


And of course many many many other satellites that have been in space a very long time and some that will be there almost forever. Until some like the Voyagers run into something in another galaxy, or our solar system gets vaporized by our sun as it dies in a few billion years. Ah yes, ending on positive note.... :)
 

XolveJohn

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That vehicle is up to no good. Something evil. Maybe hunting Vanguard. Or Sputniks.

I think it mounts a 100KW solid state laser for burning up terrorists.

And might dive down to dust Syria with fentenyl powder. One LB can kill 50 million people! Our tax dollars at work. :headbang:
 

markkoelsch

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That vehicle is up to no good. Something evil. Maybe hunting Vanguard. Or Sputniks.

I think it mounts a 100KW solid state laser for burning up terrorists.

And might dive down to dust Syria with fentenyl powder. One LB can kill 50 million people! Our tax dollars at work. :headbang:
No good? Sounds like a quality purpose. Perhaps the rods of god.
 

XolveJohn

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For those who don't know, that was some Star Wars era kinetic weapon idea, tungsten rods coming in at hyper velocity to poke a hole in your army tanks, or head. I guess some anti-tank tank shells are like that, no explosive. Depleted uranium that actually gets harder as it goes thru. Weird. But don't think it is safe. Soldiers would sleep under Iraqi tanks blasted with DU, most got some kind of illness from the dust.

Here are some ideas of what that thing is doing:

In May 2010, Tom Burghardt wrote for Space Daily that the X-37B could be used as a spy satellite or to deliver weapons from space.[26] The Pentagon subsequently denied claims that the X-37B's test missions supported the development of space-based weapons.[26]


In October 2014, The Guardian reported the claims of security experts that the X-37B was being used "to test reconnaissance and spy sensors, particularly how they hold up against radiation and other hazards of orbit."[29]


The U.S. Air Force has stated the X-37B is testing a Hall-effect thruster system for Aerojet Rocketdyne.[34]


https://www.livescience.com/48338-x37b-space-plane-conspiracy-theories.html

SurveillanceWhile the United States military has plenty of surveillance satellites in orbit, some people have suggested that the X-37B has high-tech monitoring gear designed to keep an eye on certain regions of Earth. "X-37B is probably carrying prototype reconnaissance gear, for spying on the Middle East and other sensitive geopolitical regions," said ExtremeTech.com. So what's the advantage of using a space plane to spy instead of a satellite? The plane likely can move to a region of interest faster than a satellite can, Business Week reported, although others have pointed out that the fuel requirements for doing this would likely be prohibitive.Space bombingWhile conspiracy theorists have jumped on this notion, Popular Mechanics dumped cold water on the idea. "Changing a spacecraft's orbital plane requires a great amount of thrust — so using something like the X-37B as a bomber would mean changing its orbit to fly over targets, and that would eat up its limited fuel supply," Popular Mechanics stated, quoting University of Maryland professor Mark Lewis, a former Air Force chief scientist.Interfering with other satellitesAnother idea is that the X-37B is, in the style of James Bond, supposed to take out other satellites that are making the U.S. government nervous. But, unless the plane is somehow conducting these nefarious activities from far away while not moving around very much, some suggest this is unlikely. "It would be very easy to trace that sort of activity back to the U.S. government since governments and amateurs alike can easily track the X-37B,"
 
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