Simplest Level 1 Certification bird I could build

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I don't do spirals
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Extra fin, nothing airfoiled, no spirals filled, trying to kep AGL altitude to a minimum. 4880 AGL. Her name is "Yocertifydis"
 
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tab28682

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I certified level 1 with a larger 4" diameter model on a I motor. Used motor ejection and the size of the model kept the altitude fairly low, so it was even simpler than what you are doing.

Agree that you need dual deploy for a model that size if you are going to around 5000 feet, but not the simplest way to get a level 1.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

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That’s not a complicated rocket, but it’s not necessarily the “simplest“, and I can see several potential issues. Basically they all boil down to the high altitude.

There is the potential to lose sight of the rocket at that altitude, but if you have good spotters and maybe a pair of binoculars, it probably won’t be a huge problem.

The other thing about the altitude is that you need the JLCR, but the JLCR does add a point of failure. It could fail to open, or the chute could free itself prematurely.

And the last thing about the altitude is that such a long coast adds inaccuracy and uncertainty to the motor eject delay time, making it more likely to have an early or late ejection.

That’s not to say it’s a “bad“ plan, just not necessarily simple. If someone asked me how to do the simplest level 1 certification flight, I’d recommend a 4” rocket of about 40 ounces, a Aerotech single-use H motor that would put it up 1,000 to 1,500 feet, motor eject, no chute release. That’s what I think of as simple. It’s even possible to do an L2 flight that simple.
 

PayLoad

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That’s not a complicated rocket, but it’s not necessarily the “simplest“, and I can see several potential issues. Basically they all boil down to the high altitude.

There is the potential to lose sight of the rocket at that altitude, but if you have good spotters and maybe a pair of binoculars, it probably won’t be a huge problem.

The other thing about the altitude is that you need the JLCR, but the JLCR does add a point of failure. It could fail to open, or the chute could free itself prematurely.

And the last thing about the altitude is that such a long coast adds inaccuracy and uncertainty to the motor eject delay time, making it more likely to have an early or late ejection.

That’s not to say it’s a “bad“ plan, just not necessarily simple. If someone asked me how to do the simplest level 1 certification flight, I’d recommend a 4” rocket of about 40 ounces, a Aerotech single-use H motor that would put it up 1,000 to 1,500 feet, motor eject, no chute release. That’s what I think of as simple. It’s even possible to do an L2 flight that simple.

Never thought about it that way - Thank you
 

MaxQ

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H182-1.

Whew...............................................!
Whatya gonna call it...Scalded Cat?

See Ya! Outa Here!
 

dr wogz

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i did an event at NYPower a few years ago: Builds a specific kit & launch with a specific motor (LOC ISP Caliber with an I-195) I had a JLCR & Altimeter, but no tracker. (It did have a 'screamer' in it though..)

Lost it. But did get it back a few months alter (local farmer found it) And this was after scouring the airfield about an hour with a friend (did get some great shots of the Movie Belle as it landed while doing so!)

I managed to hit 5-somehtign thousand feet. But everyone who was watching lost it..
 

Bowman

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@PayLoad

I managed to hit 5-somehtign thousand feet. But everyone who was watching lost it..
I always take a set of cheap binoculars with me now.
They can find the rocket when haze or altitude renders my eyes ineffective.
All of my un-recovered flights were flown sans binocs.
 

dr wogz

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I always take a set of cheap binoculars with me now.
They can find the rocket when haze or altitude renders my eyes ineffective.
All of my un-recovered flights were flown sans binocs.
every flight is a learning event! :D

I have tried to track with Binocs, but once you loose it..
 

Back_at_it

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Simplest rocket I could build was the Warlock. Almost 8 inch dia.

Projected altitude with an H550 is 600-650ft. motor ejection, no electronic on board. Simple as it gets.
 
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PayLoad

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out-of-sight altitude is not dependent on motor diameter..
I can hobble a rocket by making it weigh 10lbs and be 10 inches around. It just felt like cheating, thats all. No real rockets were designed to get the LEAST altitude possible. I know it counts either way, but.....
 

Bowman

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every flight is a learning event! :D

I have tried to track with Binocs, but once you loose it..
True, but with my eyes I still have a better chance of finding it again in the sky than I do without the binocs.

I usually watch the whole flight from ignition to landing with the lenses.
I have lost sight and recovered a few times, I just try to never look away once the bird is off the pad, until I can see landmarks around the landing area.
Of course I don't fly much above 7-8k AGL so there is an obvious limit to visual tracking.

I know there is a adrenaline rush to hitting the big numbers but My preference is to be able to see the flight.
To each their own. :)
 

Bowman

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I can hobble a rocket by making it weigh 10lbs and be 10 inches around. It just felt like cheating, thats all. No real rockets were designed to get the LEAST altitude possible. I know it counts either way, but.....
Adding that weight adds other complications to the successful flight and recovery.
It's still a challenge, I wouldn't call it cheating. A design feat is a design feat.
 

tab28682

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I actually prefer flights where I can see everything as it happens, with bare eyeballs. Most of my I motor high power flights are in the vicinity of 2K feet high.
 

jqavins

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Simple, simpler, simplest, whatever. Don't like to build large diameter? OK.

Fire engine red stands out pretty well against sky and grass alike. What color is your parachute? (Please, nobody needs to mention job hunting.)

All that matters is this: good luck with the flight!
 

AtomicStorm

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I have recovered a few rockets that my eyeballs lost with a cheap fpv quadcopter. Doesnt matter what color it is, it stands out pretty well, white stands out the most against the ground though. I just make sure to bring a dark blanket or towel to throw over my head so i can see the screen good when flying fpv. Double the hobby, double the fun!!
 

neil_w

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I can hobble a rocket by making it weigh 10lbs and be 10 inches around. It just felt like cheating, thats all. No real rockets were designed to get the LEAST altitude possible. I know it counts either way, but.....
That is... one way to look at it.

L1 certification simply means you safely flew and recovered a rocket on an L1 motor. As your reward for succeeding, you get the right to purchase and fly H and I motors in the future. That's it. There are no additional achievement points for going higher. Sending a rocket to almost 5000' simply means that you'll have more of a challenge with tracking and recovery.

But there should be plenty of folks there to help you keep eyes on it, and MDRA has a pretty large recovery area, so as long as everything functions correctly you should be in good shape. Good luck!
 

BEC

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The other thing about the altitude is that you need the JLCR, but the JLCR does add a point of failure. It could fail to open, or the chute could free itself prematurely.
There are three failure modes for JLCR that I've seen (and done :eek:):

1. Forget to turn it on. That's the only "fail to open" I think I've ever seen.
2. Forget to tether it to the nose cone/recovery harness. Then it does its thing and falls away on its own. Finding one loose in a field is possible, but it ain't easy.
3. 'Chute getting free of the rubber band before the JLCR opens. This is where the real art of using the Chute Release comes in. But if you've been using it you know this one, and how to get around it.

For what it's worth, I used a nearly dead stock Estes Leviathan as my Level 1 cert model. Three inch diameter. I used a "baby H"—a CTI H87 (3-grain 29mm). It's 8 N-s over the line from G into H. 2339 feet per the Pnut aboard. This was before the JLCR existed. A 5000 foot flight would've been fun, but problematic at that field without some kind of dual deployment setup, and so far I've only gotten into JLCRs myself for dual deployments.
 

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I'm not pleased with the tall altitude, but it is what it is. JLCR, only failures I've ever had? I forgot to turn it on......
 

jqavins

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So... In that case... Don't forget to turn it on. 😁

Also, they've got a soft grass field down there, so it'd probably survive if you do. Then you wouldn't get the cert, but you'd be ready to try again immediately.
 
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