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QR Code for your Eggtimer WiFi widgets

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soopirV

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Hi all- I'm not sure if this is common knowledge or not, but I lost the page of my notebook that had all my Eggtimer Switch and Quantum SSIDs and Passwords, and thought, "There has to be a better way!" Boards are too small for me to write on, so I thought about leveraging technology...and it worked!
1) google a QR Code generator website that will accept free-text (there are several, the one that I chose is https://www.the-qrcode-generator.com/, but I have no affiliation with them).
2) Type out the info you need to store- in my case I wrote: SSID: Quantum_xxxyyy (insert real characters here), and on the next line, Pass: aaaazzzz, and included a line to indicate the version of firmware on the device (so I can check it at a glance- if there's an update, I'll reprint the QR).
3) Print on label paper (as durable as possible), and cut out the little square, and stick it to the WiFi metal shield. I experimented with sizes- default is 1" square, which is too large to fit on the shield. I tested 0.5", 0.33" and 0.25"; the 0.25" would read, but it took awhile, and not always easily. The 0.33" read quickly and consistently for me, so i went with that. You can adjust the size using whichever program you're using to print...YMMV.
4) I only had regular address labels at home with an inkjet printer, so I printed on a label, and then covered with matte-finish Scotch tape (the normal kind we all have in our kitchen drawers). I then trimmed out the code, and applied it to the devices. See Photos below.
4) download a QR reader suitable for your device (again, there are dozens, use what works for you)
5) If you need to know what the settings are, activate your reader, and point it at the code you previously printed, and presto, all the info you need is in your hand!

IMG_1652.jpgIMG_1653.jpgIMG_1654[1].jpg

The limits of QR code are pretty large- about 4000 characters for the basic type...I'm thinking of implementing the following- what else can you think of?

A) For MPR, I currently have a table printed on decal paper showing the 29/40-120 options and their simulated altitudes...QR code would take that from a table and reduce it to a quarter of a postage stamp (and could include optimal delays!).
B) For HPR- one could (maybe?) write a checklist and store it as a QR code. Stick the code somewhere prominent, and ensure it is scanned before you leave the flight line. This allows for customized checklists for rockets that may have unique requrements.
C) For all- create a QR code that includes your Name, Phone, NAR/TRA Member ID, whatever else you want- stick it somewhere conspicuous on your rocket or hardware (or payload, if it's deployable). Some individual who finds it (rocketeer or not) may recognize the symbol, and scan it on his or her smartphone (Chrome has an included app for this, you don't even need to download anything if you have Chrome).
D) Stick a QR code on your AT cases showing which loads go within, or which need FSD, etc. Not sure if this will work, since the clearance is tight, and the case gets hot, but the fact that there are so many variables with AT is one reason (one BIG reason) I enjoy flying CTI. If I can use technology to take some of the mental angst out, I would!
E) Some day it would be AWESOME to have a "Club approved QR code" on each bird- in it are the vital stats that you have to fill in again and again on the flight cards. RSO might have a smart-device, scans the code, you enter or authorize a few key details (engine, recovery), and your flight is recorded in the club database. A LOT more efficient than flight cards?

What else have you done with this? What else can we do?
 

Worsaer

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Yes, this is a cool technology that can store a lot of info. Similarly, a simple QR on your rocket could contain something like:

If Found, please contact:
John Doe
1313 Mockingbird Lane
312-555-1212
Tripoli ID# 18765


You might even get Mark at Stickershock to make a sheet of them for you!

 

cerving

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That's pretty cool. Never thought of that...
 

soopirV

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Yes, this is a cool technology that can store a lot of info. Similarly, a simple QR on your rocket could contain something like:

If Found, please contact:
John Doe
1313 Mockingbird Lane
312-555-1212
Tripoli ID# 18765


You might even get Mark at Stickershock to make a sheet of them for you!

Exactly! That's what I proposed in suggestion C- have you done this? Has anyone used it to find information about your rocket to return it to you?
 

ttabbal

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https://lifehacker.com/5835743/how-...roid-users-with-a-qr-code-and-barcode-scanner

According to that, if you use the wifi option for the sites they linked, and are using Android to read it, it will auto-connect the network for you. IOS users will get the info, so it's not completely useless for them as well.


I used a Brother label printer to put the password on the shield, but this is an even better option. A little more complicated, but easier long term. If you combined it with Tasker, you could also put the device into wifi-only mode to get around Android's annoying refusal to talk to a non-internet network if cellular is available. I might do that part if nothing else, if SSID starts with quantum_ etc...
 

soopirV

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https://lifehacker.com/5835743/how-...roid-users-with-a-qr-code-and-barcode-scanner

According to that, if you use the wifi option for the sites they linked, and are using Android to read it, it will auto-connect the network for you. IOS users will get the info, so it's not completely useless for them as well.


I used a Brother label printer to put the password on the shield, but this is an even better option. A little more complicated, but easier long term. If you combined it with Tasker, you could also put the device into wifi-only mode to get around Android's annoying refusal to talk to a non-internet network if cellular is available. I might do that part if nothing else, if SSID starts with quantum_ etc...
That is a great finding! Beep, connect! Going to try that tonight, thanks!!
EDIT: Thinking more about this, is it possible to buy an android device and not have a SIM card with it? I have an iPhone, and don't need a second phone...but I would like to get a cheap/used Android for use as a WiFi device on the range.
 
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dhbarr

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is it possible to buy an android device and not have a SIM card with it? I have an iPhone, and don't need a second phone...but I would like to get a cheap/used Android for use as a WiFi device on the range.
Sure, lots of folks use simless phones to control various projects. Disable the cell radio to save some battery, and presto: pocket tablet!
 

ttabbal

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There are wifi only devices you can get pretty cheap. Old phones without a SIM should be fine as well.
 

soopirV

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Was looking through a cabinet we rarely use and found my wife's old Samsung Galaxy S4. Screen is pretty rough, but it powers up (after a charge) and will permit me to try this QR-WiFi log in posted earlier, as well as RocketGPS tracker using the HC-06 and Eggfinder! Didn't know she still had it, but saved it because there are pictures on there...was able to get them off (not as easy as I expected!) which freed up the device for my nefarious uses...
Printing new QR codes using the tool linked in ttabbal's post so I can get an instant-lock on the network of the device. Printing in triplicate now- one for the device, one to stick on the rocket on the outside (in case I need to reestablish connection to shut it down), and one for my notes.
 
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