Quantcast

Length of Big Daddy engine spacer?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Pat_B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
923
Reaction score
0
I have a Big Daddy that I just completed and am missing the engine spacer. I actually used the kit as a demo model for TARC kids to show them how through the wall fins were constructed. So my BD was partially constructed for many years. I just finally completed it and realized I had lost the engine spacer. I'm guessing the spacer might have had a length that was equivalent to the difference in length between a D and E motor, but wanted to verify that. thanks.
 

BEC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2009
Messages
3,298
Reaction score
342
Location
Auburn, WA
A JT-50C stage coupler will make a good stand-in adapter....or just cut a 1 inch chunk off of a spent 24mm motor casing.
 

Pat_B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
923
Reaction score
0
I got lucky on my first launch in that the motor stayed in place without the adapter. I didn't know that it needed an adapter because the motor seemed to have topped out when I slid it in. The second flight had the motor shift forward and lose some thrust from being recessed too far. That decreased the altitude, and the -5 sec delay was too long. Ejection happen exactly as it hit the ground :)

I worked on a quick repair using fiberglass last night and got it back into pretty good shape considering I thought it was a lost cause.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,426
Reaction score
935
If you have the spent motor, you can cut a 1" section off to act as a new spacer.
 

samb

Lifetime Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
3,837
Reaction score
243
Location
Plano, TX
If you have the spent motor, you can cut a 1" section off to act as a new spacer.
(but I digress...) Trying to slip back unnoticed ? How are your feet ?


... The second flight had the motor shift forward and lose some thrust from being recessed too far. ...
(to the OP... ) Your second flight ? So the first flight was a success without the spacer ? Lucky.
 
Last edited:

Pat_B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
923
Reaction score
0
Yeah, got lucky on the first flight. The motor was a tight fit, so it seemed to stop right where it should have when pushed in. Now that I remember properly, we got two good flights out of it before the third one that crashed.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,426
Reaction score
935
Trying to slip back unnoticed ? How are your feet ?
Ha ha! You spotted me on my first post back! There's no way to seek into this place quietly...

The feet are good. I got some blisters early on, but they healed quickly. I had an occasional sore foot, sore ankle, sore knee, sore hip, sore muscles etc., but all-in-all the hiking parts of my body held up pretty well. The biggest physical challenges were actually illness --- my wife and I both got sick at different times. She got a bad cough, chest infection and something similar to conjunctivitis and needed a round of antibiotics to clear it all up. I got a cough and a really bad sore throat that took a lot of time to go away.

Despite the difficulties, it was an incredible experience. We saw a lot of beautiful countryside, wonderful villages and cities, and incredible architecture. You can really feel the history. And we met wonderful people. That was the best part of all --- the people.
 

samb

Lifetime Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
3,837
Reaction score
243
Location
Plano, TX
Yeah, got lucky on the first flight. The motor was a tight fit, so it seemed to stop right where it should have when pushed in. Now that I remember properly, we got two good flights out of it before the third one that crashed.
Wow, double lucky. Almost sounds like you got a slightly out-of-spec 24mm motor tube with your Daddy.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,426
Reaction score
935
Yeah, got lucky on the first flight. The motor was a tight fit, so it seemed to stop right where it should have when pushed in. Now that I remember properly, we got two good flights out of it before the third one that crashed.
That was pretty lucky!
 

samb

Lifetime Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
3,837
Reaction score
243
Location
Plano, TX
Ha ha! You spotted me on my first post back! There's no way to seek into this place quietly...

The feet are good. I got some blisters early on, but they healed quickly. I had an occasional sore foot, sore ankle, sore knee, sore hip, sore muscles etc., but all-in-all the hiking parts of my body held up pretty well. The biggest physical challenges were actually illness --- my wife and I both got sick at different times. She got a bad cough, chest infection and something similar to conjunctivitis and needed a round of antibiotics to clear it all up. I got a cough and a really bad sore throat that took a lot of time to go away.

Despite the difficulties, it was an incredible experience. We saw a lot of beautiful countryside, wonderful villages and cities, and incredible architecture. You can really feel the history. And we met wonderful people. That was the best part of all --- the people.
Whoa ! I think a little pain is to be expected on the Pilgrim Walk but that sounds like a little too much divine retribution. Glad you're back, here's to the good memories.
 
Last edited:

ThirstyBarbarian

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,426
Reaction score
935
Whoa ! I think a little pain is to be expected on the Pilgrim Walk but that sounds like a little too much divine retribution. Glad you're back, here's to the good memories.
Thanks! It was amazing.
 
Top