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Launch report

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kenobi65

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So, we finally had an evening that wasn't windy and / or rainy, so I took a few rockets to the park. Specifically, I brought along:
- Estes Viking
- Estes Baby Bertha
- Centuri X-24 Bug clone

First off was the Bug, on a B4-2. Nice flight, though (as always seems to be with this one) a little windcocky, and a good (though somewhat steep) glide down, to a safe landing.

Next, I sent up the Viking on an A8-3. On her only previous flight, she'd come down a little hard, and one of the five fins came about 90% undone -- the glue bond held, but it took off the top layer of the body tube when it "popped." I'd glued it back together, hoping that it was sufficient; it wasn't. While this looked like a good flight, and she came down close enough to me that I could catch her in the air, I immediately saw that:
(1) Although the ejection charge had kicked out the streamer, it'd also kicked out the engine (guess I didn't put on enough tape.)
(2) The previous damage had come undone again; the fin was hanging on by a tiny bit of body-tube.
(3) The area of the BT under that fin was now pressed in.
Sadly, I think the Viking's retired.

The third flight was the Baby B, on a B4-2. Nice straight flight, but the parachute lines got twisted, and the chute never really opened. Fortunately, the combination of a very long shock cord and the semi-open chute acted as a streamer, and I was able to beat feet across the park to catch her before she hit.

Next, I reloaded the Bug on another B4-2. Very similar flight to the first one, only it arced off towards the street, where it hit nose-first with a "crack". I ran over there, and saw that the balsa nose-cone had a nice dent in it.

After carefully re-packing the chute on the Baby B, I sent her up again on another B4-2. Though she windcocked a bit, the chute opened perfectly, and she drifted down into my hand yet again.

The sun was going down, and I decided to tempt fate and send the Bug up once more. Same kind of flight, only this time she landed nose-first in a patch of wet mud (that was probably actually a puddle a day ago). Got fairly muddy, but I was able to clean her up pretty well. I think the nose needs a new paint job, and she definitely needs a little more weight in her hiney, but she'll fly again.
 
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