Has anyone used Sharpies/Permanent markers with paint?

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KenECoyote

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Hi All,

I have a multi-color paint job I'm doing right now and was wondering if I could outline some of the patterns with a black sharpie (either regular or ultra-fine point). Has anyone done this and if so, how were the results? Also how does a clear coat go over it?

Thanks!
 

EXPjawa

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What I've done is to use Sharpies to draw panel lines and such, and put Future over it with good success. Or maybe occasionally to touch up something. I don't think I've actually successfully sprayed clear coat over the marker; I have the feeling that the reducer in the clear would attack the ink and cause it to run. Also, I have seen situations where underlying marker proved hard to cover with paint, but that might also vary depending on the paint.
 

Micromeister

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What I've done is to use Sharpies to draw panel lines and such, and put Future over it with good success. Or maybe occasionally to touch up something. I don't think I've actually successfully sprayed clear coat over the marker; I have the feeling that the reducer in the clear would attack the ink and cause it to run. Also, I have seen situations where underlying marker proved hard to cover with paint, but that might also vary depending on the paint.
Ditto EXPjawa's post:
Sharpies though they say "Permanent" wick and spread if one tries to apply spray clear coat. Future works well, as does Krylon Workable Fixatif which is designed for use over pastels, markers and charcoal.
EXP is absolutely right on about fine line markers being very hard to cover with light color paints. All that I've tried have had a tendency to bleed through whites, yellows, orange, light reds & light blues. If using to outline a grid patten a #2 pencil is a better choice, or if using a mechanical pencil with either HB or softer leads.

All the said I keep a load of Fine line, regular and Jumbo markers around along with an assortment of color ink pens for use on model detailing. After the application is dry I brush on a thin coat of future or hit the area with a coat of 1306 Krylon workable fixatif.

Magic Markers-a_Sharpie Colors (for Contest Balsa)_00's.jpg
 

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K'Tesh

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Ditto EXPjawa's post:
Sharpies though they say "Permanent" wick and spread if one tries to apply spray clear coat. Future works well, as does Krylon Workable Fixatif which is designed for use over pastels, markers and charcoal.
EXP is absolutely right on about fine line markers being very hard to cover with light color paints. All that I've tried have had a tendency to bleed through whites, yellows, orange, light reds & light blues. If using to outline a grid patten a #2 pencil is a better choice, or if using a mechanical pencil with either HB or softer leads.
I've had sharpie markings bleed through Rusto's Filler Primer. Not so bad when it's a black Sharpie, not fun when it's red (and a lighter color (e.g. white) is intended as a top coat.
 

KenECoyote

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Thanks guys! I had actually experienced those same issues in the past but it was so long ago that I'd forgotten. I did however make a few small reference marks on a present build...I think I read I can use nail polish to cover it to prevent it from bleeding. Anyone heard of that or know of another good cover that can be painted over?
 

rharshberger

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Thanks guys! I had actually experienced those same issues in the past but it was so long ago that I'd forgotten. I did however make a few small reference marks on a present build...I think I read I can use nail polish to cover it to prevent it from bleeding. Anyone heard of that or know of another good cover that can be painted over?
A lacquer (regular nail polish), or a shellac will seal the marker.
 

kcobbva

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Ken,

All the time. Fine point for parallel lines as was suggested. Correcting minor errors. Straightening lines. I'm notorious for using sharpies. Color match is a pain in the tail, but that's really only for close up. 5-10 feet away and no one will notice! Afterwards I just paint a clear coat. I almost always use Rustoleum and honest cannot recall an issue I've had. Black sometimes turns a bit purple, but after it dries I hit it a time or two again, but that's only when repairing a dinged spot or something and I don't feel like masking off to recover in paint. I've got every color I could grab in my collection just for modeling purposes.
 

KenECoyote

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Ken,

All the time. Fine point for parallel lines as was suggested. Correcting minor errors. Straightening lines. I'm notorious for using sharpies. Color match is a pain in the tail, but that's really only for close up. 5-10 feet away and no one will notice! Afterwards I just paint a clear coat. I almost always use Rustoleum and honest cannot recall an issue I've had. Black sometimes turns a bit purple, but after it dries I hit it a time or two again, but that's only when repairing a dinged spot or something and I don't feel like masking off to recover in paint. I've got every color I could grab in my collection just for modeling purposes.
Wow! Cool to know! Thanks Kevin! :)
 

les

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Ditto EXPjawa's post:

EXP is absolutely right on about fine line markers being very hard to cover with light color paints. All that I've tried have had a tendency to bleed through whites, yellows, orange, light reds & light blues.
Hmm - what about an idea to take advantage of the bleed through. What if you used a fine line to enhance detail mold lines (like an Interceptor style nose cone) then painted over it. The sharpie could bleed through with that enhancement??
 

KenECoyote

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Hmm - what about an idea to take advantage of the bleed through. What if you used a fine line to enhance detail mold lines (like an Interceptor style nose cone) then painted over it. The sharpie could bleed through with that enhancement??
From what I recall when it happened to me, the bleed through (when it occurs) can look blotchy, which isn't so good. Maybe Kevin can chime in with his experience.
 

Winston

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I've had sharpie markings bleed through Rusto's Filler Primer. Not so bad when it's a black Sharpie, not fun when it's red (and a lighter color (e.g. white) is intended as a top coat.
I've had the same problem, except mine was with a black "permanent marker." Top coat was white.
 

hornet driver

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I've had some success using a sharpie. It can be cleared with a fast drying lacquer based clear. Don't try it with one coat though--it will bleed. Also apply over a well sealed or glossy finish--it will bleed on a flat paint and spread--what a mess!! As mentioned before ,shellac will seal it off. Be careful handling. it may be permanent but over some glossy paints it will rub off easily, even after several days.--H
 

KenECoyote

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Thanks for the help and advice guys! :)
 
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