When Did They Change The Date?

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RocketT.Coyote

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In recent years, the calendars show the date of The First Moon Landing as July 21st. National Geographic magazine, Life magazine, and Walter Kronkite all give the date of that historic event as July 20th 1969. Also the gas station glass tumbler I have. Did someone have a brain fart at the calendar bureau? Greenwich meantime? Global conspiracy?
 

DavidMcCann

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What timezone was the studio in that they filmed them faking it? ;)
 

Steve Shannon

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In recent years, the calendars show the date of The First Moon Landing as July 21st. National Geographic magazine, Life magazine, and Walter Kronkite all give the date of that historic event as July 20th 1969. Also the gas station glass tumbler I have. Did someone have a brain fart at the calendar bureau? Greenwich meantime? Global conspiracy?
Two different things maybe? They landed on the moon on the 20th, but didn't walk on the moon until the 21st.


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rharshberger

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Wikipedia says landing was on July 20, 1969 at 20:18 and Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon surface on July 21, 1969 at 02:56 ( 6 hours after landing). Both times are UTC, maybe Wikipedia has this one right.

Edit: Wikipedia is once again wrong, from an Americans point of view, our history has it as Eastern Daylight time and the event occurred on July 20, see Georges post below.
 
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mikec

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https://history.nasa.gov/SP-4029/Apollo_11i_Timeline.htm

The landing by any reasonable metric was on July 20. If calendars say otherwise they're wrong.

As to time zones, it only seems fair that some US timezone would apply. Being from Houston I'd say Central time, but I guess a case could be made for Eastern.
 

RocketT.Coyote

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100_5041.jpg
My USO calendar gives July 21st. That's also the 55th anniversary of the Liberty Bell 7 mission btw.
 

georgegassaway

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No, this is insanity.

The date is the date of WHERE IT HAPPENED,and not what time it happened to be in England.

OK, technically it “happened” on the moon, but the mission began in Florida on Eastern Daylight Time and that is the time/date of record for NASA history.

Keep in mind that “wiki” is whoever manages to wrest control of the information, no guarantees any of it is correct. And in about 50 years maybe the Apollo-11 “historic facts” will be about the hoax denying it ever happened because the hoaxers might gang up someday and take over the wiki pages on the pace program.

Anyway, back for an example, Explorer-1. It was launched Jan 31st, 1958, at 10:48 EST. SOME wiki pages and others who are into this ridiculous “UTC Dating” say it was launched Feb 1st. NO IT WASN’T! It was launched Jan 31st 1958!!!

Otherwise, hey, if I was born between 7 PM and midnight on April 27th, then according to this madness I would have had the wrong birthday all my life and I was actually born on April 28th, because it was April 28th in England, never mind the FACT it was April 27th WHERE I was born? No way.

Don’t settle for this garbage, resist it.

First step on the moon happened on July 20th, 1969. Get over it wiki and lazy or stupid calendar "historic date" writers. I mean, "RE-writers", trying to rewrite historic facts like that.


"July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind"


https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html
 
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rharshberger

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No, this is insanity.

The date is the date of WHERE IT HAPPENED,and not what time it happened to be in England.

OK, technically it “happened” on the moon, but the mission began in Florida on Eastern Daylight Time and that is the time/date of record for NASA history.

Keep in mind that “wiki” is whoever manages to wrest control of the information, no guarantees any of it is correct. And in about 50 years maybe the Apollo-11 “historic facts” will be about the hoax denying it ever happened because the hoaxers might gang up someday and take over the wiki pages on the pace program.

Anyway, back for an example, Explorer-1. It was launched Jan 31st, 1958, at 10:48 EST. SOME wiki pages and others who are into this ridiculous “UTC Dating” say it was launched Feb 1st. NO IT WASN’T! It was launched Jan 31st 1958!!!

Otherwise, hey, if I was born between 7 PM and midnight on April 27th, then according to this madness I would have had the wrong birthday all my life and I was actually born on April 28th, because it was April 28th in England, never mind the FACT it was April 27th WHERE I was born? No way.

Don’t settle for this garbage, resist it.

First step on the moon happened on July 20th, 1969. Get over it wiki and lazy or stupid calendar "historic date" writers. I mean, "RE-writers", trying to rewrite historic facts like that.


"July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind"


https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html
Its amazing that the times and dates changed based on the so called "UTC", personally I like the EDT that NASA made their official record by (July 20th all the way) , not much arguing with that, the people that made the history should be the ones calling the shots. I hate modern versions of history, are they even still teaching history in school these days?
 

DavidMcCann

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Where do you guys get your tin foil hats? All I can find is this Aluminium crap.


As far as I know, there is no calendar on the moon. Which is lame, they should have one based on rotations about the earth. So one Lunar year is about 27 days. Man how old is a dog on the moon?

Anyways- lacking a date on the moon itself- I'd say that the date it happened is relative to who's asking. If you were alive at the time, it's your local time. Actually... I'd say it happened at local time to wherever a person is now....on the theory they live in that timeline.

And to be technically correct- it happened at all times. To report it truly accurately, seeing as it happened with no true local earth time, as it was off earth, you'd have to report all earth times as the event time.
You could shorten it in a report and say XX:XX EST on XX/XX/XXXX. But it would have to be qualified with EST. UTC/GMT/etc is an attempt to standerize time. Given the scope and scale of the events....I find no fault in this. In theory it should be based on some solar system standard of time, but lacking that, setting one earth time isn't all that crazy.
 

James Duffy

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No, this is insanity.

The date is the date of WHERE IT HAPPENED,and not what time it happened to be in England.

OK, technically it “happened” on the moon, but the mission began in Florida on Eastern Daylight Time and that is the time/date of record for NASA history.
A couple of comments...

* UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) is, inarguably, the worldwide standard for aviation, and probably has been since the ICAO was founded in 1944. (Whether or not that extends to late 1960s spaceflight is open to debate.) The International Space Station uses UTC as a time standard.

* I seem to recall that NASA used Houston time (Central time) to track all mission events during the Apollo era.

* The bulk of the world's population experienced the Apollo 11 landing and moonwalk during the hours of July 21. On the other hand, the people who paid the bills (the US taxpayers) experienced these events on July 20.

I have no horse in this race, but it strikes me as entirely reasonable to list both the UTC and CST (Houston) times to correctly define when the mission events took place.

James
 

dhbarr

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How finely we divide the seasons and quibble about imaginary lines on a globe. Humanity went to the moon!
 

dixontj93060

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I can't believe the Apollo engineers didn't think of this and have delay the launch another 6 hours so we wouldn't be wasting time arguing this point :wink: -- corollary, they had (and we have) better things to do.
 
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Steve Shannon

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Whether it's represented as UTC or CST doesn't matter. That's just a label. It's still exactly the same relative moment in history as long as the relevant time zone is included in the designation.


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10fttall

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That makes sense, call it whatever time you want, as long as the time zone is noted. But the calendar date that is the anniversary of an event should absolutely be the time zone where the people came from and nation that designed, built, and paid for the trip.
 

Kirk G

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It's an interesting discussion, and not one that I have ever worried about.
I know where I was as he descended the ladder...sitting in a farm house on a YMCA overnight camp...watching a poor quality black and white TV set and not able to recognize the figure.... but everyone cheered loudly and said that he had done it, and so we all celebrated.

I think the much larger issue that threatens mankind is not whether the hour or date is correct, but the mudding of the waters from the conspiracy nuts who want to deny that man went to the moon at all...
and broaden that to include a militant distrust of the government as evil and pulling hoaxes over on the general public at every turn. THAT's the real danger.... IMHO.
 

georgegassaway

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I just find it amusing that some think that say, 33% of the people living in the Pacific Time Zone have the wrong birthdate, 33% of them (if born from 4 PM to midnight) were born THE NEXT DAY from what their birth certificate says they were born, according to the "UTC revisionist historian theory".

And according to the same logic, a lot of people in Japan, China, etc. were actually born a DAY EARLIER, for those born after midnight in their country but not before it was midnight in England (International Dateline issue).

Back to Apollo history and dates, go with NASA as your resource, not wiki or idiotic calendars.
 

Mushtang

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But aren't both correct?

If I say Armstrong first stepped onto the moon on July 20th 1969, at 10:56pm, isn't that ambiguous? Without a designation for the time zone because it happened on the moon it's difficult to say when that time is.

However, if I say it happened on July 20th 1969, at 10:56pm est, or on July 20th 1969, at 9:56pm cst (Houston), or on July 21st 1969, at 02:56 UTC, they all refer to the same exact moment in time. How can one be wrong and another be correct?
 

Steve Shannon

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But aren't both correct?

If I say Armstrong first stepped onto the moon on July 20th 1969, at 10:56pm, isn't that ambiguous? Without a designation for the time zone because it happened on the moon it's difficult to say when that time is.

However, if I say it happened on July 20th 1969, at 10:56pm est, or on July 20th 1969, at 9:56pm cst (Houston), or on July 21st 1969, at 02:56 UTC, they all refer to the same exact moment in time. How can one be wrong and another be correct?
Exactly my point.
 

YodaMcFly

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I have no dog in this race, other than to point out that Unix, Linux, etc keep the system clock at Zulu, then use timezone offsets to keep everything synchronized. Windows, like the idiot stepchild that it is, forces the system clock to the local timezone.

Admittedly, they've gotten better with interop, but it still sucks.

We now return you to your regular pointless discussion ...
:cool:
 
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