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jcb

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I am sure this has been talked about over and over. What is the best way to let the paint dry on your rocket? Upright? Horizontal? With a slow turning motor? Can you point me in the right direction?
Thank-You
 

stantonjtroy

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I'm a painter by trade and I'd have to say that if orientation becomes an issue, you've probabily got too heavy a coat of paint. :p

FWIW
 

jdud

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The key is to apply several light layers of paint at a time. Avoid applying the paint so thick as to cause runs. This way it doesn't really matter which way the rocket dries.
 

Intruder

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I am sure this has been talked about over and over. What is the best way to let the paint dry on your rocket? Upright? Horizontal? With a slow turning motor? Can you point me in the right direction?
Thank-You
A position in which the rocket won't touch (or be touched by) anything.
 

NjCo

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A position in which the rocket won't touch (or be touched by) anything.
Bingo. Put a rolled up piece of heavy paper in the engine holder or the body tube and use that to support the rocket if it is small enough to support the weight of the rocket. For bigger stuff I put a dowel in the body tube end of the rocket and stand it up right. And I always paint the nose cone and body separately.

But the above point is spot on. If you are painting heavy enough that runs become an issue then you are putting on way too much paint.
 

Intruder

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I use dowels with spent engines glued on the end.
 

hcmbanjo

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I agree with Intruder and NjCo,

After you try the dowel and casing for a painting handle, you won't go back to rolled up paper again. While the rolled paper does work, the dowel/casing combination is stonger and more secure.
If you insert the casing end in a motor mount with a engine lock, you could turn the model any direction (even upside down) without worry that the rocket will fall off.

For example:
In 18mm engine mount models, use a 1/2" x 12" diameter dowel with a empty engine casing on one end. It'll fit the casing fine either glued or with a wrap or two of tape.
 

MarkII

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It's the most important technique for painting with rattle-cans - applying the paint in light, thin coats. Even though it is simple, it can be the hardest technique to learn. (It took me years.) You have to exercise restraint, and not go for full or perfect coverage in one coat.

MarkII

P.S. What took me years to learn was not how to go easy on the button - that was easy. No, what took so long was realizing that I had to start doing that.
 
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jdud

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A few years back I read an article in Auto Scale Modeler about laying down perfect paint jobs. The article discussed applying primer coats but focused on the final color. Basically, after applying the first and second coats, there should still be primer shining through (kind of a mottled appearance). The third coat should bring the color to a more uniform appearance, and subsequent coats can be used to deepen the color. The final coat can go on a little thicker than previous coats such that it has a wet appearance - but be careful - too much and you will have a run. Some colors such as silver cover the base/primer coat very well and will not need as many layers.

As previously mentioned, I typically use dowels to hold the rockets while they dry.

I've found that painting can sometimes be the most frustrating part of building (especially since I live in the South with 100% humidity). I'm a bit of a perfectionist and hate it when I get orange peel, cracking, bad mask lines, etc. I always try to learn from a mistake such that my next paint job is even better than the previous. One day I'll get one right.
 

Micromeister

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I am sure this has been talked about over and over. What is the best way to let the paint dry on your rocket? Upright? Horizontal? With a slow turning motor? Can you point me in the right direction?
Thank-You
jcb:
Just about all the earlier comments are good. If your new to painting your models might I invite you to visit the narhams.org library section. look up "Tech-Tips" if you'll download 002-005. these pdf articles will take you from bare wood or cardboard to finished model. with lots of tips and insights on products and methods.

To reinforce what has already been stated Spary Painting with Rattle can or Gun requires a bit of practice and patients. spraying in light passes over a couple minutes to complete a coat. How the model is set to dry really has little difference if the coating is applied correctly. Personally I "Normally" have my models standing vertically during painting on a spring driven lazy susan equipped with a spent D motor casing. into this a 1/2" dowel with an 18mm spent casing is slide allow the model to be removed from the turntable at any time for relocation or inspection. The length of the 1/2" dowel can be whatever length is required for the model and can be fitted with 18mm and 24mm motor casings to fit the motor mount of any model I'm painting. 13mm models fit right on the dowel. smaller motor mounts can have smaller dowels etc. Drying on the other hand can be in horizontal or vertical position in 2x4 blocks or a 2x2 vertical board hung on a door edge to allow 12 micro models to be spaced horizontally to save counter space.
Here are a few photos of the turntables "Manual and spring loaded" and the motor mount dowels & different orientation stands used in my spray booths & rocket building basement.
Sometimes a pic or two are worth a 1000 words.
Hope this helps.

Construction-c_8-of-8 Primered_01-24-08.JPG


Construction-b_4-of-8 Sanded ready for primer_01-24-08.JPG
 
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