Cost-effective blast deflector for HPR?

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FredA

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I've read about table saw blades being used
Do NOT use saw blades and the like unless they are tied down.
In my early Balls years I borrow a pad with a big saw blade as a blast plate.
That thing went flying sideways at high speed and landed about 30 yards away.
Would have been nasty if it hit something.
 

cwbullet

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Do NOT use saw blades and the like unless they are tied down.
In my early Balls years I borrow a pad with a big saw blade as a blast plate.
That thing went flying sideways at high speed and landed about 30 yards away.
Would have been nasty if it hit something.
How the heck did that happen? We usually put the rail adaptor through them.
 

David Schwantz

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I also use the plow disc from Fleet Farm. The large one will run you about 40 bucks. But with 16" rockets, some of the smaller ones will not work. they do make several sizes. Hole in the middle for attachment.
 

FredA

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I bought a few 2'x2' squares of 1/4" thick steel plate at my local steel yard.
Cost about $25 each.
 

RocketRev

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As I'm sure somebody else has already said, going to the local Goodwill or Salvation Army stores was what I did for years to find blast plates for my own club. Having a drill press to drill the right sized hole thru old rusty cookie sheets, stockpot lids, and steel trays helped a lot. Occasionally, they'd be a burn thru, but not that often. And the bent edges helped to maintain their mostly flat shapes. The biggest complaint that I got was, "They don't look very professional." Personally, I figure that function is more important that looks. My wife would agree with that every time she has to look at my face! But that's a whole 'nother topic. These makeshift blast plates from second hand stores worked great for 1/4 to 1/2 in rods and smaller rails.

When we got into larger rockets needing much larger pads, we went with worn out farm implement discs. Occasionally, we still use them under very large motors to keep from making too deep of a hole in the ground from the motor blast. Gee......., I wonder if that's why we call them "BLAST PLATES?"

Brad
 
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