Quantcast

Best books for HPR...

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

ewomack

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 9, 2019
Messages
366
Reaction score
174
Right now I'm reading Harry Stine's classic "Handbook of Model Rocketry 7th edition" because so many people have recommended it to me it as essential reading. So far I can see why.

Once I finish that, I would like to move on to a book about HPR, preferably one that I'll understand as a relative beginner. My next goal in this hobby is to hopefully move towards L1. Then I would like to incorporate electronics and maybe experiment with a CanSat or something similar, etc. From there, I don't know. As for my current level, I have successfully built and flown a number of LPR and MPR rockets over the past year. The largest motor I have successfully flown to date is a D12-5. For various reasons, I don't think that I'll maintain a long term interest in LPR or MPR, but HPR appeals to me, so I would like to make the jump, but I would like to make an educated jump. A book, or a few books, seem like a good place to start.

A few dominant HPR books appear in searches.

1. "Make: High-Power Rockets"
2. "Modern High-Power Rocketry 2" (I think the "2" refers to an edition and not to a series?)
3. "A How-to Guide for Obtaining Your Level One High Power Rocketry Certification"
4. "Modern High-Power Rocketry An Illustrated How-To Guide" (this one might be out of print?)

Though I could and probably should read all of these, does anyone recommend a starting point in this list? Are there other books not listed that would work better for someone at my level? Or do any good video series exist on HPR? I've seen some of the Apogee videos on HPR.

As for an HPR rocket, I'm considering a MadCow Super DX3 Payloader because I've heard it has a good payload bay and easily accommodates both L1 and L2.

Thank you!
 

Tim51

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
899
Reaction score
179
Location
London, United Kingdom
Right now I'm reading Harry Stine's classic "Handbook of Model Rocketry 7th edition" because so many people have recommended it to me it as essential reading. So far I can see why.

Once I finish that, I would like to move on to a book about HPR, preferably one that I'll understand as a relative beginner. My next goal in this hobby is to hopefully move towards L1. Then I would like to incorporate electronics and maybe experiment with a CanSat or something similar, etc. From there, I don't know. As for my current level, I have successfully built and flown a number of LPR and MPR rockets over the past year. The largest motor I have successfully flown to date is a D12-5. For various reasons, I don't think that I'll maintain a long term interest in LPR or MPR, but HPR appeals to me, so I would like to make the jump, but I would like to make an educated jump. A book, or a few books, seem like a good place to start.

A few dominant HPR books appear in searches.

1. "Make: High-Power Rockets"
2. "Modern High-Power Rocketry 2" (I think the "2" refers to an edition and not to a series?)
3. "A How-to Guide for Obtaining Your Level One High Power Rocketry Certification"
4. "Modern High-Power Rocketry An Illustrated How-To Guide" (this one might be out of print?)

Though I could and probably should read all of these, does anyone recommend a starting point in this list? Are there other books not listed that would work better for someone at my level? Or do any good video series exist on HPR? I've seen some of the Apogee videos on HPR.

As for an HPR rocket, I'm considering a MadCow Super DX3 Payloader because I've heard it has a good payload bay and easily accommodates both L1 and L2.

Thank you!
Number (2) in your list is a revised, expanded and updated version of number (4), both by Mark Canepa. Even MHPR2 is 16 years old now, so it doesn't cover things like filament wound fibre glass construction, or have up to date info about trackers or altimeters (a lot of the brands it mentions have sadly disappeared). Moreover, some of the recommended techniques (eg gluing shockcord loops with epoxy and fishing line, rather than stitching) are out of date. Nevertheless, I'd still recommend MHPR2, because it comprehensively covers all the principles of HPR, guides you through all the key aspects that differentiate HPR from LPR, and contains lots of case studies of how different rocketeers approach various aspects of motor retention, recovery, construction and certification Levels 1-3. Any book is going to show its age sooner or later, because the hobby evolves fast. My advice still would be to read MHPR2 to build a thorough base knowledge, but also supplement that with conversations with experienced L3 HPR flyers at your club, and of course avidly read build threads and other 'how to' discussions here on TRF.
 

markjos

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
Messages
318
Reaction score
52
+1 to the previous comments by Tim51 and prfessr. I think that #1 and #2 are both valuable tools, and do a really good job covering materials and techniques in HPR. Even despite its age, MHPR2 is a very useful reference. While the same topics are covered, the Make: High Power Rockets takes a slightly more science-based approach to its presentation, and has a bit more up-to-date look at materials and electronics. I’m still working through LDRS, bit by bit - certainly also a worthwhile read on the drama and history of high power rocketry. All good additions to your bookshelf.

Where to start? With Stine under your belt, I’d say #1 or #2. MHPR2 was my partner in planning and building my L2, and first electronic deployment construction, but it’s been a while.

And yes, do keep reading TRF. Much wisdom to be gained, with the appropriate filters in place, as with any electronic source.

My $.02
 

ewomack

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 9, 2019
Messages
366
Reaction score
174
Thank you for the comments so far, everyone! It looks like MHPR2 may provide a good starting point and the "Make" book may then provide some more technical and possibly up to date information as well. Thanks for the clarification around #2 and #4 as well.

No one commented on #3, so I'm guessing that it's not very well known? It's written by Tim Quigg, published by ARA Press (I purchased their short but fascinating "The First Seven Centuries of Rocketry"), runs 52 pages and has a release date of July, 2018. The length and the relatively low cost might make it worth a look?

I do have a hardcover copy of "Large and Dangerous Rocket Ships" and I can't wait to read it. My reading list can get a little... complicated at times... but it looks incredible.

IMG_8484.JPG
 

rocketman328

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Dec 2, 2019
Messages
45
Reaction score
21
Location
South Bend, IN
Right now I'm reading Harry Stine's classic "Handbook of Model Rocketry 7th edition" because so many people have recommended it to me it as essential reading. So far I can see why.

Once I finish that, I would like to move on to a book about HPR, preferably one that I'll understand as a relative beginner. My next goal in this hobby is to hopefully move towards L1. Then I would like to incorporate electronics and maybe experiment with a CanSat or something similar, etc. From there, I don't know. As for my current level, I have successfully built and flown a number of LPR and MPR rockets over the past year. The largest motor I have successfully flown to date is a D12-5. For various reasons, I don't think that I'll maintain a long term interest in LPR or MPR, but HPR appeals to me, so I would like to make the jump, but I would like to make an educated jump. A book, or a few books, seem like a good place to start.

A few dominant HPR books appear in searches.

1. "Make: High-Power Rockets"
2. "Modern High-Power Rocketry 2" (I think the "2" refers to an edition and not to a series?)
3. "A How-to Guide for Obtaining Your Level One High Power Rocketry Certification"
4. "Modern High-Power Rocketry An Illustrated How-To Guide" (this one might be out of print?)

Though I could and probably should read all of these, does anyone recommend a starting point in this list? Are there other books not listed that would work better for someone at my level? Or do any good video series exist on HPR? I've seen some of the Apogee videos on HPR.

As for an HPR rocket, I'm considering a MadCow Super DX3 Payloader because I've heard it has a good payload bay and easily accommodates both L1 and L2.

Thank you!
I would start with Make: High Power Rockets
 

Mike Haberer

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
233
Reaction score
143
Thank you for the comments so far, everyone! It looks like MHPR2 may provide a good starting point and the "Make" book may then provide some more technical and possibly up to date information as well. Thanks for the clarification around #2 and #4 as well.

No one commented on #3, so I'm guessing that it's not very well known? It's written by Tim Quigg, published by ARA Press (I purchased their short but fascinating "The First Seven Centuries of Rocketry"), runs 52 pages and has a release date of July, 2018. The length and the relatively low cost might make it worth a look?

I do have a hardcover copy of "Large and Dangerous Rocket Ships" and I can't wait to read it. My reading list can get a little... complicated at times... but it looks incredible.

View attachment 424877
I just finished it. It's a fascinating read. Considering high power initially got started when I was a kid flying Estes BP motors, it was eye opening to see the progression in the HPR realm over the years. Having just gotten into HPR at age 65, I have a lot of catching up to do....
 

Theory

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2018
Messages
729
Reaction score
447
LDRS is a fantastic book. ive read a few chapters several times; "lets punch a hole in the sky..."

that said, if you are looking for construction advise or a "how to do X" book, that is not it.

as others have said, "Modern High Power Rocketry 2" is dated, however, if you are most concerned with gaining more knowledge and looking to a L1 project, it will surely suffice.

IMHO, the most important thing is one that cannot be taught, and that is experience. this comes with trial and error, and takes time. build a few F and G powered rockets (lots more power there than your D12) then build an L1 bird and get comfortable with H and I motors. Lots of "room" at L1 as a full tilt I is much different than a baby H.

oh, and never forget to have fun. thats why we do this right?
 

JLP1

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
52
Reaction score
35
I got LDRS for Christmas and started reading it in March thru May during the darkest days of the lockdown and the covid spread. Everyday I would set down and read a few pages it was like a breath of fresh air. It would take me back to better days and I would set back close my eyes and envision the launches and the people gathering. Groups of people around the country working on some of those projects and then traveling to the various locations to launch. And reading about the personalities of some of the movers and shakers in HPR. It was an excellent read and I found myself wishing for just a few more chapters. Some of the folks I've met like the Rocketman and J. Jarvis characters all. Great Book 👍
 
Top