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Anvils + BP = WTH

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kjohnson

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And we get hassled by the BATF?

[YOUTUBE]IhQ4dE_RGnQ[/YOUTUBE]
 

rokitflite

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Yeah, but Kevin... Its Wilford Brimley so its OK... Duh! :rolleyes:

"It's the right thing to do and a dangerous way to do it!"
 

kelltym88

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Wow. NAR and Tripoli spent millions of dollars to continue to have the right to fly rockets, and this guy lites a fuse and casually walks away. And they say rocketry is dangerous? I don't care that the guy does it, I just don't like the bad name rocketry gets when there is other, much worse activities that go unchecked.
 

AKPilot

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Unless there's a national "Launch an Anvil" association, the BATFE will have a hard time finding such people.
 

Peartree

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Unless there's a national "Launch an Anvil" association, the BATFE will have a hard time finding such people.
The video claims that this guy was/is the "World Champion Anvil Shooter," so such an organization must exist.
 

rstaff3

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Maybe that anvil has cultural significance or is antique?
 

AKPilot

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I don't think this would be legal, if someone caught people like this. The trick would be to find out when and where the National Anvil Launchers Association is going to meet.

To be honest, having grown up with blackpowder, rendezvous', and muzzleloading all of my life - these people are pretty stupid. As a teenager I was at a statewide redenzvous in California doing the flint and steel event on the ground (get spark, make fire, burn through string, weight hits bell for time). No one realize the idiot guy in front of my accidentally spilled most of his powder horn ahead of me. So, unknowingly, my first spark with the flint and steel lit approximately an entire powder horn. I was thrown back at least 10', there was a 3 foot hole in the ground, and people were tackling me. I didn't realize that my hair was on fire. The fire was so hot that my glasses were melted, my eyelashes were literally burnt into my skin, I had no eyebrows, my ears were shriveled up, and I had significant burns over 1/4 of my body. A RN on hand was afraid to transport me back into Redding. They had to call on CB (remember before cell phones) for a Highway Patrol to come out to verify that what was being said on the CB was real, and then I got medivac'd out. While waiting they just kept pouring water on me (that was the treatment at the time). I didn't feel anything because of shock. Later determined to have first, mostly second, and spots of third degree burns from my chest up. I was out of my senior year in high school for a while recovering. I still have spots on my face and chest that are numb and discolored. My largest facial and chest blisterS (more than one) were five inches in length and 3/4" in width.

And for those that used to see the old western movies where they light a long string of blackpowder and it burns slowly - that's simply Hollywood not reality. It all goes up as instantaneously as you can see.

So "NO" I wouldn't advocate using BP in this manner or any other manner, other than it's intended purposes. Filling an anvil with BP is stupid. Filling it straight from the (1lb) can compounds the issue that much further. If you source of static or ignition happens, you're toast. I know . . .


Besides, I don't think he has an FAA waiver. I'm sure that anvil is over 3.3lbs
 

Mikus

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I don't think this would be legal, if someone caught people like this. The trick would be to find out when and where the National Anvil Launchers Association is going to meet.
Apparently not. Finding them really doesn't seem like much of a trick to me. :roll:

'The National Anvil Shooting Contest — the Super Bowl of competitive anvil shooting — has been held every April since 1994, in the tiny town of Laurel, Mississippi.'

Man, why doesn't the BATFE crack down on these guys???

'Despite their shared implement, anvil shooters and contemporary blacksmiths have not forged a common bond. About a decade ago, the Artists Blacksmith Association of North America, whose membership of 5,000-plus makes it the largest blacksmiths' group in the United States, banned the practice because of safety concerns.

"We lost a good six or seven hundred members because of that decision," says Rome Hutchings, president of the organization. "The board took action and disavowed several rogue chapters that continued that activity."

Hutchings can't recall a specific incident or injury that prompted his organization to outlaw anvil shooting, but he heatedly defends the policy. "It's dangerous," he says. "It's probably one of the more dangerous things that can be done. I've heard reports of anvils coming down on top of people's cars, anvils flying apart, near misses with human beings.

"It's really not a sensible thing to do with an anvil."'

Duuuuuh. And it shouldn't be hard to find the king himself:

'The sleepy streets of Farmington are lined with tidy yards and modest bungalows, making it easy to pick out the house that belongs to Gay Wilkinson.

It's the one with the fake anvil sticking out of the roof.'


Ah... I think I'm beginning to understand.

'Located about 70 miles southwest of St. Louis off Highway 67, Farmington is home to approximately 13,000 citizens, a state prison and a mental hospital. It is also the undisputed anvil-shooting capital of Missouri, and in that regard Wilkinson is its unofficial ambassador.'


On to the legalities.

'There's also the murky question of whether anvil shooting is legal.

Mike O'Connell, a spokesman for the Missouri Department of Public Safety, says he is unaware of any state laws that expressly prohibit anvil shooting. Still, notes O'Connell: "There may be local ordinances that would bar this activity in a particular community."

The practice could easily fall under the umbrella of disturbing the peace, i.e., "Anything that unreasonably disturbs or alarms another person or persons," he says.

"I'm not familiar with this activity," O'Connell adds. "But it sounds like it would certainly get someone's attention."

Critics of anvil shooting, including Blacksmiths Association president Rome Hutchings, wonder why lawmakers have never tackled the issue. "I just don't understand how states and counties and municipal governments can be totally oblivious to this," Hutchings marvels. "I wouldn't be too opposed, if people had to be licensed for this kind of activity."'

Wow.

aint-rocket-science
 

troj

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You know, I have to admit, I'm very disappointed by the direction that some folks seem to want to take this thread.

We raise holy heck when anyone wants to regulate rocketry, and here we have people wanting to regulate another group.

They're anvils, not witches -- stop hunting.

-Kevin
 

Buckaroo

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Looks kinda like a pre-historic form of bowling ball lofting... :rolleyes:
 

AKPilot

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You know, I have to admit, I'm very
We raise holy heck when anyone wants to regulate rocketry, and here we have people wanting to regulate another group.
I'm pretty moderate in my views, but rocketry is regulated; self-regulated based on sound/proven processes. Anvil launching is not. Hence the difference.

Besides, they're all still over 3.3 lbs and need to have an FAA waiver. LOL!
 

troj

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I'm pretty moderate in my views, but rocketry is regulated; self-regulated based on sound/proven processes. Anvil launching is not. Hence the difference.
There are people who would state that your comments do not apply to rocketry and that it's dangerous. You happen to disagree with them on that, but not on the anvils.

Besides, they're all still over 3.3 lbs and need to have an FAA waiver. LOL!
They're not rockets, ergo the 3.3lb rule for rockets does not apply.

Looking for the government to find yet another reason to slap yet more regulations on someone is a path this hobby does not want to encourage, regardless of who it's on.

-Kevin
 

evil ed

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I think their slogan is:

"Hey, hold my beer and watch this!"
 

dave carver

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And yet they're within the law. I see hardly any difference between this and owning and firing a Civil War cannon except for the fact that the cannon has the potential for doing much more devastation if used for what it it was intended for. A bunch of guys punting anvils 200 feet into the air bothers me not, I'm just bummed my 55 lbs. Harbour Freight anvil is solid and underweight for their competetion.

Maybe I can convince them to let me pack the lower anvil and start a new division for cheapskate anvil launching;):D
 

WiK

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Bah, who needs BP to throw an anvil when you have a kilt?

[YOUTUBE]AZUFfKOp51c[/YOUTUBE]
 

troj

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My gosh, WiK! Someone might get hurt doing that! Why, the anvil might get dropped on the thrower's head, or they might slip and hit someone else in the leg or foot with it.

It should be illegal, it's dangerous!

[YOUTUBE]zrzMhU_4m-g[/YOUTUBE]

-Kevin
 

Peartree

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In all seriousness though, if there is a waiver for muzzle loaders and cannons but otherwise BATFE wants an LEUP for black powder, wouldn't anvil throwers at least have to apply for an LEUP and have approved storage since they don't fit into any of the waivered categories?
 

r1dermon

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The term “destructive device” shall not include any device which is neither designed nor redesigned for use as a weapon; any device, although originally designed for use as a weapon, which is redesigned for use as a signaling, pyrotechnic, line throwing, safety or similar device;
(taken from Section 5845(f) of Federal Firearms Regulations sec. ATF P 5300.4)

Black powder. Except for the provisions applicable to persons required to be licensed under subpart D, this part does not apply with respect to commercially manufactured black powder in quantities not to exceed 50 pounds, percussion caps, safety and pyrotechnic fuses, quills, quick and slow matches, and friction primers, if the black powder is intended to be used solely for sporting, recreational, or cultural purposes in antique firearms, as defined in 18 U.S.C. 921 (a)(1 6) or antique devices, as exempted from the term "destructive devices" in 18 U.S.C. 921(a)(4).
im sure if the BATF cared about anvil launchers, who probably make up .000001% of the population of the US, they'd regulate it...but it doesn't look like it can be called a DD (which technically you are allowed to own in MO), or any other type of weapon. a sporting device primarily...then again, im not a lawyer...
 

r1dermon

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In all seriousness though, if there is a waiver for muzzle loaders and cannons but otherwise BATFE wants an LEUP for black powder, wouldn't anvil throwers at least have to apply for an LEUP and have approved storage since they don't fit into any of the waivered categories?
a cannon would technically be a destructive device by definition, since it's designed to launch a projectile larger than .5", except that it's been exempted from regulation because it's an antique device...BATF wants an LEUP for black powder that's not used for sporting, recreational, or cultural purposes...you can buy fireworks which contain black powder with no permits, since they're not designed as weapons, and create a pyrotechnic effect as their primary purpose.
 

sandmantoy

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Seriously that looks like a lot of fun even though it uses a lot of BP lol. It look like they kept a safe distance from it. I don't see any thing similar to rocketry to be compared. You ether get how BP works and are safe with it or you need someone to regulate you. I have been around BP all my life and many rocket folks have not. Lets face it there are more dangerous things to mess around with. Not excepting the facts is also dangerous. At least they don't have to walk far to get there anvils lol. I think here in the US we are not so bad with safety as some places are. We don't all get together and shoot guns in the air in celebration right. I think rockets could be made to be more dangerous that BP or with the use of BP. One big thing that keeps us able to fly rockets is we try to look out for each other and regulate ourselves. A pain these rules are but may help keep the bad that are not in our group from making us look bad. Well it is still a fight every time you here of an incident somewhere.

Here is some dangerous play without any rules.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=872_1228718217
 

davel

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BATF wants an LEUP for black powder that's not used for sporting, recreational, or cultural purposes...
IN ANTIQUE FIREARMS.

"sporting, recreational, or cultural purposes in antique firearms" has been ruled to be a single phrase. It does NOT mean 'sporting purposes', 'recreational purposes' or 'cultural purposes in antique firearms' - it is exempt ONLY when used in an antique firearm.

If the exemption covered BP for sporting or recreational purposes, we would have no issue using it for ejection charges.
 

foose4string

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Yeah, but Kevin... Its Wilford Brimley so its OK... Duh! :rolleyes:

"It's the right thing to do and a dangerous way to do it!"
Wilford Brimley my A. That was Santa Claus! Didn't you see the elf and Ms. Claus in the video?

That bang sounded eerily familiar.:D;)
 

MarkII

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Neither the government nor anyone else needs to be concerned that this "sport" might spread beyond the little towns of Laurel, MS and Farmington, MO. I'm pretty confident that the number of participants is, um, self-limiting, if you know what I mean... Same for those guys with the sledgehammers. All are future Darwin Awards laureates. :rolleyes:

The Darwin Awards: Chlorinating the gene pool...

MarkII
 
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