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Wikipedia high power rocket entry

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Mark_1984

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I've got a bit of an unusual favour to ask here. As part of an Open University Course I have to make an improvement to Wikipedia. Having looked at the existing entry on high powered rocketry, it is pertaining to Americabut there isn't so much UK content. I've therefore decided to add some UK specific content. Specifically about certification and obtaining AP motors in the UK.

The OU require me to ask a colleague, fellow student or friend to critically assess the changes I have made. I will need to quote from his or her verdict on my edits in my report.

The url to the edited page is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Power_Rocketry

I thought that a group of subject matter experts would be the perfect people to critic my edits, so could you let me know what you think ? I really appreciate you help.

Cheers
Mark
 

brianc

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What's with the RSO line in between the levels? I'm confused
by that...

Also, I can't resist this one-
Ammonium Perchlorate Composite Propellant (AP) motors are classed as explosives,


:D



EDIT: You might also consider explaining the difference of K-class vs. K impulse...
 
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Mark_1984

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My understanding of the RSO requirements was wrong. I've changed it so it should be more understandable now.

It's the UK Health and Safety Exec who class AP as explosive, but it's going to take hours of searching thier web site to find a reference !!
 

MarkM

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1) the abbreviation for Ammonium Percholorate Composite Propellant is best as APCP not just AP. AP refers only to the oxidizer and the not other ingredients that make up the propellant.

2)
A motor with 1kg of propellant is a class K motor, so model rocketeers can now flying level 2 models without the need for an explosives license.
This is slightly misleading. A L motor is a L2 motor yet it exceeds 1kg of propellant weight so not all L2 motors can be purchased without a permit. You should clarify/ be specific or eliminate this statement. Also, CHANGE flying to FLY

3) grammatical:
This relaxation in the regulations as made mid and high power rocketry much more accessible in the UK.
Change as to HAS

4)
Level 1 : H, I

Level 2 : J, K, L

Range Safety Officer (RSO)

Level 3 : M, N, O
This ordering makes it look like you need to pass a RSO exam before you can do a Level 3 project. Is that correct or can you do a L3 without becoming an RSO? You need to clarify that.

5) grammatical
The UKRA recognise the certification from the following National Organisations, who also recognise the UKRA certifications.
Certification needs to be changed to certifications. In the US language, recognise is spelled recognize (with a z). Not sure if this is your error or the slight differences in spelling between the UK and US English.
 
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Mark_1984

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Hi Mark,

Thanks for the comments. I've made the corrections. UK English does use an S instead of a Z in many cases if ize/ise !!

The bit about the RSO was confusing and I've changed it now. You don't need to be an RSO to get to L3. A UK RSO can be any level. It should be clearer now.
 

MarkM

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Much clearer on the RSO

One other mistake. Typo
RSO can be be either a Model Ropcket RSO, Level 1 RSO,
Rocket has a typo
 

Mark_1984

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Thanks Mark. I'm sure somebody keeps swapping the letters on my keybaord ;)
 

brianc

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As I noted earlier (and Mark hinted at too), I'm confused by this-
A motor with 1kg of propellant is a K impulse motor,
Do you across the pond really classify motors by propellent mass, not
impulse??!?!?

I think this is a result of the rocketstore page (Ref. #10), that is taken
slightly out of context...

Also note the Wiki hint at the top of the article about excessive
external links... I think this was just recently added, perhaps by your
addition of a link that popped a threshold...
 

Mark_1984

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The reason for mentioning the size a motor that contain 1Kg of propellent is simply so people know how big a motor they can buy without an explosives licence. That's the only reason for mentioning it. As far as I know, it's the only time people are interested in the weight of propellent.

I was wondering about the note about too many links. I did move some away from the text and into the external link and references section, thinking that they might not count. Didn't make any difference :(
 

init 6

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A motor with 1kg of propellant is a K impulse motor,
I'd re-word that line. While technically correct it has the possbility of misleading people to think that any K motor is legal without a license.

Something along the lines of :

Most J* and some small K impulse motors have less than 1kg of propellant and therefore model rocketeers can fly level 2 ...


*I'm too lazy to check if all Js have less than 1kg. You're a student you've got plenty of time to check :)
 
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