When is the NASA SLS launch date?

Zman1961

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At our club launch last week, someone put an Estes SLS on one of the low power racks. Every time the launch rotation got to it, a different, legitimate, reason was given for not being able to launch was announced on the PA system. I think 90% of the attendees missed the joke, but it was was kind of fun for those of us who did get it.
 

Jeff Lassahn

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While it's nice that SpaceX does a good job operationally with their in-production rockets, I'm always perplexed by the notion that they supposedly don't slip R&D schedules.
I'm still waiting for that 2018 circumlunar Dragon capsule flight, and and looking forward anxiously to the 2023 starship version of the same mission.
 

Antares JS

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It seems like Space-X has introduced a new concept into rocketry: "On-Time Launches".
Let it be known that Cygnus-Antares NG-11 was the first CRS mission to launch on the date originally requested by NASA. We did it before SpaceX.

And we had to overcome some colossal issues to do it. NG-11 was a troubled child.
 

techrat

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@Antares JS , looks like you're going to work tomorrow and still seeing a rocket. Or just as you arrive at work, is when it's supposed to launch. They scrubbed today, trying for tomorrow. Sorry.
 

Antares JS

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Or just as you arrive at work, is when it's supposed to launch.
If you think I'm going to work tomorrow if we launch, think again.

Maybe NASA should post guards at all the fire alarm pull stations in the mission control building on the 14th.
😁
There actually was a fire in a server room. I guess they need to monitor them for overheating better? Or maybe damaged wire insulation? Not sure.
 

BEC

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And this evening they posted a slip of a couple of days since they have to stand down doing preparations while the storm goes by. So now the 16th. I guess we'll see. I really would like to see it fly, and work fairly well.
 

MClark

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Assuming the worst and it blows over in the storm.
I don’t want to think about the solids land sharking.
Taking the boosters apart laying on the ground with the pins side loaded would be most difficult. Any “hot” accident goes to a land shark.
Water jet the propellant out? I have water jetted ejection seat sized motors and it works safely but a remote operated machine would to be created. I think it has been done with icbm size. Amount of waste is impressive. When we did it one pound of propellant gave ten lbs of water saturated waste.

It's all bad.
 

DAllen

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Knowing how hyper risk adverse NASA is I really doubt leaving the SLS out on the pad is going to be an issue.
 
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From the NASA Artemis blog:
"The SLS rocket is designed to withstand 85 mph (74.4 knot) winds at the 60-foot level with structural margin. Current forecasts predict the greatest risks at the pad are high winds that are not expected to exceed the SLS design. The rocket is designed to withstand heavy rains at the launch pad and the spacecraft hatches have been secured to prevent water intrusion."
 

Antares JS

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From the NASA Artemis blog:
"The SLS rocket is designed to withstand 85 mph (74.4 knot) winds at the 60-foot level with structural margin. Current forecasts predict the greatest risks at the pad are high winds that are not expected to exceed the SLS design. The rocket is designed to withstand heavy rains at the launch pad and the spacecraft hatches have been secured to prevent water intrusion."
That does make sense if you're building a rocket to launch from Florida...
 

cerving

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I also think that NASA doesn't want to roll it back into the VAB again... and have the flight get pushed back into 2023.
 

bad_idea

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I also think that NASA doesn't want to roll it back into the VAB again... and have the flight get pushed back into 2023.
Per Eric Berger, "While NASA has not confirmed this, according to a source, NASA has just one remaining roll in its budget. This does not mean the rocket will fall apart with additional roundtrips, it's just that additional movements would incrementally increase the risk of damage."

I don't always take what Eric Berger says about SLS at face value, but the wear and tear of rollback being a reason to take a risk at the pad wouldn't surprise me.
 

MClark

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Didn’t fall over at 100!

 

Mushtang

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It's going tonight.
I feel it in my bones.
"According to a forecast from the 45th Weather Squadron, which provides detailed assessments for air and space operations in the U.S., the conditions at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida are 90% favorable for the much-anticipated test flight of NASA’s new hardware."
 
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