Quantcast

when can you get the vaccine?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

Ron Humphrey

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
20
Reaction score
10
On the suggestion that the no-maskers be moved to the very back of the line -- based on some of the responses here, I get a sense they may be taking care of that all by themselves. Thank you; gets me mine sooner.
Some people see the low chance of serious issues from the virus along with the small chance of catching it as good reasons not to wear a mask. Some have medical issues. I had stage 3a lung cancer and have COPD. I do not wear a mask and that decision is backed up by my doctor in writing. I plan to never get the vaccine just like I never get the flu shot. Most of the people I work with also don’t wear masks. I know several people that tested positive and had no symptoms at all. If you feel better wearing a mask and getting the vaccine, by all means do so.
 

Bill Heath

Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 31, 2019
Messages
19
Reaction score
12
Exactly. This thing was rushed to market in record time. You know there were corners cut every chance they could find. These things take years to decades to create and they did it in 9 months. No thank you....!!!!

All of you waiting to move up the list, there will be a ton of spots available. Last I read, better than 50% of the population in the US said they would not be taking it. I personally don't know of a single person that is willing to take it in my group of friends, family, colleagues and clients.

I'll be willing in 10 yrs. if there are no major side effects. By that time it won't be needed anyway as we'll have something bigger and better to worry about. Lets hope the vaccine doesn't turn out the be worse then the virus.
You don't really understand the process or the science that gave us the vaccine. Do a little research on how and why we getting a vaccine this soon. In the meantime, quit trying to scare people away from a lifesaving vaccine
 

Not Quite Nominal

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2018
Messages
103
Reaction score
123
Some people see the low chance of serious issues from the virus along with the small chance of catching it as good reasons not to wear a mask. Some have medical issues. I had stage 3a lung cancer and have COPD. I do not wear a mask and that decision is backed up by my doctor in writing. I plan to never get the vaccine just like I never get the flu shot. Most of the people I work with also don’t wear masks. I know several people that tested positive and had no symptoms at all. If you feel better wearing a mask and getting the vaccine, by all means do so.
That's definitely the best choice for you.

Let's talk science. Per the Danish study, two weeks of mask wearing reduces transmission by 22% - helpful, but not a panacea.

Now let's do the math. At 80% population compliance, there's a 96% chance of at least one mask between any two people. 90% compliance gets it up to 99%, for a whole 3% increase.

The math here is pretty clear: at a population level, permitting people who have COPD, asthma, claustrophobia, etc to go without masks poses almost no threat. Even giving a little leeway to people who occasionally leave their masks at home will pose no threat.

I wear a mask. Getting healthy people like me to wear a mask most of the time is good science (Danish study, referenced above)

Getting outraged over occasional non-compliance isn't science, it's just virtue signalling.

You don't really understand the process or the science that gave us the vaccine. Do a little research on how and why we getting a vaccine this soon. In the meantime, quit trying to scare people away from a lifesaving vaccine
Actually, we do understand the science. The Pfizer vaccine is an mRNA vaccine, and the AstraZeneca one is adenovirus-vectored. These are extremely novel technologies, never before deployed in the human population at scale.

Every vaccine from Edward Jenner onwards has used the exact same mechanism: introducing foreign proteins to trigger an immune cascade. These vaccines are totally different. Both of them inject genetic material into the patient, and the patients own cells then synthesize the proteins themselves.

This is an incredible medical breakthrough, and at the population level the risks of these vaccines are likely far lower than the risks of getting COVID-19.

The population is not the individual though, and anyone smart enough to build a rocket ought to take a good long look at their own medical history to see if they have any condition (lupus, allergies, late stage cancer like the Ron Humphrey, etc.) that warrants further research.

I'll probably take it when it comes around to me. As I said before, I'm reasonably healthy.

I'll also respect the decision of any rational person who decides that the risk/reward tradeoff doesn't fit their own personal medical situation.
 

manixFan

Not a rocket scientist
Joined
Feb 15, 2009
Messages
1,967
Reaction score
948
Location
TX
My wife and I have both gotten our first doses, she got the Moderna version and I got Pfizer, just based on availability. Very surprisingly, I had a lower reaction to it than I do to the flu shot. My wife's arm was more sore than mine and lasted for a few days. Several others in my family have also gotten at least one dose and a couple have gotten two already. None have reported any significant side effects. By mid-February my wife and I should be as fully protected as we hope to be from the vaccine and are already planning a couple of trips. We have traveled twice during the pandemic with extensive precautions but it will be nice to not have to worry as much about it.

It's just terribly unfortunate that the rollout has been so uneven, given the amount of time everyone had to plan for it. From day one we knew there would be a vaccine and yet still so many agencies seem caught off guard. Interestingly, North and South Dakota, which lead the country at one time in terms of infected rates, now lead in terms of per capita inoculations.


Tony

PS: Yes, I understand the populations of ND and SD are very small so it does not take many doses to achieve a high rate, but considering how rural they are, and the tremendous resistance to masks and other measures reported there, I find it surprising they have managed to vaccinate a comparatively high portion of their population.
 

Peartree

Cyborg Rocketeer
Staff member
Administrator
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
5,334
Reaction score
826
Location
Alliance, Ohio
Deliver to the States. It’s the States’ responsibility to administer the vaccine. No way would ANY governor allow the Federal government to come to their State to administer the vaccine, nor does the Federal government have the personnel to do such a job.
And it's the Federal government's responsibility to get those doses to the states. The most recent news is basically that the Fed told the states that they were holding x-million doses for the states to use. So several of those states, and Ohio is one, said, "Send them to us so we can use them" and the Fed replied by saying that they didn't actually have them.
 

Ez2cDave

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
4,253
Reaction score
1,223
No way would ANY governor allow the Federal government to come to their State to administer the vaccine, nor does the Federal government have the personnel to do such a job.
Except for the Military . . . Stay tuned.

Dave F.
 

Ez2cDave

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
4,253
Reaction score
1,223
You don't really understand the process or the science that gave us the vaccine. Do a little research on how and why we getting a vaccine this soon. In the meantime, quit trying to scare people away from a lifesaving vaccine
Facts . . . There has never been a successful vaccine for any coronavirus before . . . Vaccines normally take several years to develop, produce, and be thoroughly tested, prior to widespread release . . . Moderna, for example, has never produced a vaccine, of any type, previously . . . There has never been an mRNA vaccine, of any type, ever before.

I hope that will help people to understand the hesitancy to receive the various Covid-19 vaccines.

Dave F.
 

Ron Humphrey

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
20
Reaction score
10
That's definitely the best choice for you.

Let's talk science. Per the Danish study, two weeks of mask wearing reduces transmission by 22% - helpful, but not a panacea.

Now let's do the math. At 80% population compliance, there's a 96% chance of at least one mask between any two people. 90% compliance gets it up to 99%, for a whole 3% increase.

The math here is pretty clear: at a population level, permitting people who have COPD, asthma, claustrophobia, etc to go without masks poses almost no threat. Even giving a little leeway to people who occasionally leave their masks at home will pose no threat.

I wear a mask. Getting healthy people like me to wear a mask most of the time is good science (Danish study, referenced above)

Getting outraged over occasional non-compliance isn't science, it's just virtue signalling.



Actually, we do understand the science. The Pfizer vaccine is an mRNA vaccine, and the AstraZeneca one is adenovirus-vectored. These are extremely novel technologies, never before deployed in the human population at scale.

Every vaccine from Edward Jenner onwards has used the exact same mechanism: introducing foreign proteins to trigger an immune cascade. These vaccines are totally different. Both of them inject genetic material into the patient, and the patients own cells then synthesize the proteins themselves.

This is an incredible medical breakthrough, and at the population level the risks of these vaccines are likely far lower than the risks of getting COVID-19.

The population is not the individual though, and anyone smart enough to build a rocket ought to take a good long look at their own medical history to see if they have any condition (lupus, allergies, late stage cancer like the Ron Humphrey, etc.) that warrants further research.

I'll probably take it when it comes around to me. As I said before, I'm reasonably healthy.

I'll also respect the decision of any rational person who decides that the risk/reward tradeoff doesn't fit their own personal medical situation.
I think that's important. As an individual you are responsible for your health decisions and what seems like a good risk/reward to one person may not to another. it also seems a bit like peer pressure to push the "My mask doesn't protect me, it protects you" and "if you are not wearing a mask you are endangering me and don't care about other people". To expect others to change their normal behavior because you believe it is a danger to you doesn't make sense. When I was undergoing chemo and radiation my immune system was wiped out and I had a very good chance of having serious issues from just catching a common cold. To expect others to wear a mask around me would have been selfish even though I had a greater chance of contracting a serious illness then than I do now from covid. I took precautions myself and still follow many of them today out of habit. I chose to continue to work and go out in public during my treatments and it was MY responsibility to manage my health risks, not put that on others.
 

Nate G

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2018
Messages
21
Reaction score
6
Well, remember polio. we got the vaccine at the local national guard armory. plenty of precedent. App aside, if no-one has mentioned it, talk to your primary care practice AND pharmacy. both are avenues that may be used by many jurisdictions after the initial priority 1 rollouts for getting the vaccine. let them know that you want it when you qualify and get "on their list" . they all have a "list". CVE, Wahlgren's and several other of the big chains are all set for clinics in the near future.
BTW, since few of you know me and may be suspect of info, I do have MD and FACS after my name. Trained at Johns Hopkins and Univ of penn and 30 years a practicing surgeon.
 

jsdemar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
2,576
Reaction score
572
Well, remember polio. we got the vaccine at the local national guard armory. plenty of precedent.
The National Guard is controlled by each State's Governor for missions with their State. The Federal government may call upon the Guard for international missions only. So, the polio vaccine distribution was run by the individual States, just as the vaccine is now.
 

hball55

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2013
Messages
1,513
Reaction score
52
Facts . . . There has never been a successful vaccine for any coronavirus before . . . Vaccines normally take several years to develop, produce, and be thoroughly tested, prior to widespread release . . . Moderna, for example, has never produced a vaccine, of any type, previously . . . There has never been an mRNA vaccine, of any type, ever before.

I hope that will help people to understand the hesitancy to receive the various Covid-19 vaccines.

Dave F.
Quit scaring me🤥👌
 

Ez2cDave

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
4,253
Reaction score
1,223

rklapp

NAR# 109557
TRF Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
1,435
Reaction score
1,013
Location
Oahu, Hawaii
I got my first vaccine shot today and now I can access the internet with my thoughts.

Seriously, I did get my first dose and I feel relieved. I have comorbidities.
 

BF Rockets

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
91
Reaction score
40
The US surpassed 900 thousand shots per day last week. With the incoming Biden administration's targeted goal of 100 million shots in 100 days, the rollout so far would seem to be at least a mild success, and the 1M doses per day a low bar.
 

SkywackerJim

New Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
I got my first shot over two weeks ago and get the second next Sunday. Unfortunately the reason I was able to get it this early was due to a severe case of pneumonia and then going into a rehab facility which had a vaccination day while I was there.
 

Peartree

Cyborg Rocketeer
Staff member
Administrator
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
5,334
Reaction score
826
Location
Alliance, Ohio
Ohio is delaying/elongating its vaccination schedule because they can't get enough doses. They are being administered as fast as we get them, but at the current rate, it will take three years to vaccinate everyone in the state.
 

Nytrunner

Pop lugs, not drugs
TRF Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
7,751
Reaction score
3,379
Location
Huntsville AL
Ohio is delaying/elongating its vaccination schedule because they can't get enough doses. They are being administered as fast as we get them, but at the current rate, it will take three years to vaccinate everyone in the state.
But if only 50% want to get it, they should be done in a year and a half!
 

jbr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2017
Messages
448
Reaction score
204
I was approved 3 weeks ago to get the vaccine, but checking the reservation spots every 30 minutes during the day shows nothing is available
 

hball55

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2013
Messages
1,513
Reaction score
52

rklapp

NAR# 109557
TRF Supporter
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
1,435
Reaction score
1,013
Location
Oahu, Hawaii
The US surpassed 900 thousand shots per day last week. With the incoming Biden administration's targeted goal of 100 million shots in 100 days, the rollout so far would seem to be at least a mild success, and the 1M doses per day a low bar.
Biden has been President for several hours and already, 400,000 have been killed. That's how it works, right? 🤔
 

cwbullet

Obsessed with Rocketry
Staff member
Administrator
TRF Lifetime Supporter
Global Mod
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
26,357
Reaction score
4,028
Location
Glennville, GA
Biden has been President for several hours and already, 400,000 have been killed. That's how it works, right? 🤔
Naw, it will take a few more hours for him to accomplish that. Watch the political comments guys.
 

RocketT.Coyote

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
77
My workplace supervisor offered me an opportunity to get vaccinated later this month.
 

Marc_G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
716
Location
Indianapolis Metro Area
What I expected to be done, back over the summer when I talked with people about mass vaccination programs, would be that the Fed would create a template procedure including a means of prioritizing recipient groups, performing outreach via multichannel marketing to drive demand, create distribution channel mechanisms (distribution for the vaccine logistics), standardized dose delivery mechanisms ("here's how you set up mass vaccination in an unused area of a parking lot..."), apps for people to enter their information to be placed into the queue and be notified of upcoming availability and scheduling of individual appointments, and so on.

We knew in the summer what the needs would be for both the Moderna and Pfizer/Biontech vaccines, if they proved successful in trials. All of the infrastructure should have, could have, been in place so that shots could have been delivered several million per day within a week of starting. All the outreach, prioritization into groups, multiple means of delivery (drive up in cars, walk up to clinics, send nurses to care facilities for the elderly), should have been done, and I should have had an app on my phone to walk me through this in early November, a month before release of the first vaccine.

Very little of this actually happened other than vague guidelines. I believe something like half the vaccine delivered to individual states hasn't made it into arms yet, because of various bottlenecks largely caused by multiple processes competing, poorly coordinated federal management, and basically everyone making it up as they went along. MAny very dedicated, awesome heroic people are responsible for getting it done to the extent that it is happening, but I look at the fact that we are far behind from where we should be, as a failure of command at the highest level.
 

Ez2cDave

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
4,253
Reaction score
1,223
Many very dedicated, awesome heroic people are responsible for getting it done to the extent that it is happening, but I look at the fact that we are far behind from where we should be, as a failure of command at the highest level.
Of course, it could also be that a vast number of people are, intentionally, not getting vaccinated.

Do you favor "commanding" people to be vaccinated ?

Dave F.
 

Marc_G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
716
Location
Indianapolis Metro Area
Of course, it could also be that a vast number of people are, intentionally, not getting vaccinated.

Do you favor "commanding" people to be vaccinated ?

Dave F.
No, at this point I think we have plenty of people willing to be vaccinated and insufficient organization of the process to accomplish it. At least, where I am, the limiting factor is neither doses nor patients. It's the process to sign people up ranked by priority and match that with availability of slots to receive the shot.

I believe getting vaccinated should be a choice with specific exceptions. Want to work in an old folks home? Get the shot. And so on.

There should be a system where everybody who wants a shot, like me, can add our name to the list painlessly online by or via an app. Each week the anticipated available doses should be matched up against the (voluntary) list of people who signed up, ranked by priority (age, job classification, health history) and so on. Notification should go out days in advance that basically groups 1 through 8 are guaranteed and groups 9-11 may be taken if supply lasts. As your priority group gets closer you get an option to confirm an appointment. On day of appointment a final confirmation that you will show goes out that you have to agree to. It should iterate through, giving highest priority to those most at risk.

Once we have more history of safety data, say 6 months from now or maybe a year, I can see vaccination becoming required for a broader range of situations. Going to public school? Required, just like MMR and other vaccinations currently are mandatory, with specific loopholes for special health circumstances. Health worker? Required.

Right now the vaccines aren't approved for kids so it's not even an issue at this time. If we get a year in and find no surprising risks from the vaccine like monsterism or invisibility, I'm sure there will be a push to have them routinely vaccinated, but at the moment they seem to be at low risk and in person schooling at low density has prevented them from being major sources of spread to adults. Returning to full density would be possible only after a substantial portion are vaccinated.
 

jazzviper1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
760
Reaction score
100
I was offered the first shot tomorrow through the base I work on but it is the Pfizer version so I turned it down. I don't trust Pfizer for my own personal reasons.
 
Top