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What References Do You Like For Scale Work?

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flying_silverad

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What References Do You Like For Scale Work?

Specifically if you are scratch building scale subjects.
 

Micromeister

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flying:
If building sport scale (Just for me) stuff, Alway's books are excellent, Yellowjacket and other websites have some info, but must be used with causion and crossreferenced to assure accuracy.

For true scale modeling, Nothing is better than the horses mouth!. I want original blue prints or a photocopy from the manufacturer, be it the entire vehicle or the component parts. Best source for this info is the National Air and Space Museum, Archive Library. Believe it or not most of the manufacturers do not have copies of most of their Older vehicle projects. Boeing being a prime example. Other books and reference material FAR to extensive to list or talk about here.
 

powderburner

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Micromister, it sure would be nice to have regular access to the NASM library. I guess if you live 'down the street' and can stop by any old time, it's one thing, but the rest of us have to make do with other sources.

flying_silverado: These days, I like to check online, but never really expect to find much data about geometry details. Even the length and diameter information is generally suspect, and often contradicts the same info from other sources.

Years ago I tried writing directly to the manufacturers and requesting data, but the pathetic responses were pretty disappointing. If you receive anything at all, it is usually some PR phamplet or photo, and some left-over sales materials. I have not been able to obtain any useful scale drawings from manufacturers by using the direct approach.

If I was an unlawful kind of guy, I have a very nice set of AMRAAM drawings in my desk at work that I could (illegally) take and post on someone's web site. However, this data is proprietary (at least----and possibly DoD classified) and I cannot offer it for public release. I have no interest in spending the rest of my life in Leavenworth just so someone can make a model rocket. I CAN tell you all that there are a whole bunch of rocket people who have build AIM-120 models with the wrong airframe diameter features, and I have not seen anyone attempt to properly model a set of scale fins.

For data sources, I am left with the same choices and options as many other folks----I look through magazines and books for some good illustrations from which I can scale a profile or frontal view or get a good definition of markings. I regularly check all the mags in the library, and keep a 'clip' file of info on the rockets that interest me (since the onset of the internet, this has become more of a 'click' file).

It sure would be nice if we could get something organized so that we could share and preserve what little data we do have.
 

sandman

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Peter Always book is good enough for most of what I do.

If I really get into a project and want lots of details then I go "detail shopping" online.

Usually color is one of the hardest parts to get right.

sandman
 

Micromeister

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Originally posted by powderburner
Micromister, it sure would be nice to have regular access to the NASM library. I guess if you live 'down the street' and can stop by any old time, it's one thing, but the rest of us have to make do with other sources.

Powder:
Access isn't that easy, you have to go in as a researcher, calling in advance, with specific vehicles or topics to be investigated. It is, I have to admit the Ultimate in Highs, actually working with the Archive Historians, these folks are nothing short of amazing! but If you can't get to the museum moas of the material has now been transfered to LP size DVD discs. I haven't used the new NASM directory but have been told, a great deal of the materials is now available. exactly how i'm not sure. but if you looking for the REAL stuff. it is the place.

Like I said in the beginning of my post, Most of Peter Always books while scarce on fine detail, is just fine for most Sport scale stuff. as well all the the Gunston books give detail pic and deminsion and history for both military and space vehicles.
 

flying_silverad

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It sounds like Mr. Alway's book is a good place to start. I'll get and search for others in the mean time.
 

sandman

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John,

Just remember one thing.

Peter Alway is not "into" military stuff.

So you will need a different refference for those.

sandman
 

flying_silverad

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Originally posted by sandman
John,

Just remember one thing.

Peter Alway is not "into" military stuff.

So you will need a different refference for those.

sandman
That's even better!!
 

shockwaveriderz

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I don't do scale myself.....after 30+ years of off again on again rocketry I am still trying to get my fins on straight............
 

Silverleaf

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I'm the same way - I use Peter's book, along with as many images and drawings/schematics/blueprints as I can find.

When I did the DMF3-Delta 3 I spent about 3 months searching for data, double and triple-checking my notes and measurements from the extensive images before I started drawing it. This included conversations via phone, and email with a few people whom worked at Being - but little info was able to be given matter-of factly - due to security and the like.

I used Paint Shop Pro 7 to resize the images to the proper heigth/width once I knew some of the key measurements, then I created it in DeltaCad.

I then contacted Kevin Forsyth and had him look it over given his knowledge of the boosters and proper numbering of the Gem systems on previous Delta systems then sent a copy of it to a few people whom knew the system to ensure I was " in the ballpark ". After recieving positive comments, it was posted.

With my recent success with Sandia Industries, I'm going to start writing other companies for older designs that little data exists for.

Cheers,
 

Stymye

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one of my favorites is ,Bill Gunston . the
enclyopedia of the worlds missiles and rockets
amazon used hardback .$7..they often have a few copys
just full of photos and diagrams... including a really cool grainy photo of a spitfire pilot, tipping a V-1 rocket off balance with his wing
 
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