What is the origin of this word?

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

LW Bercini

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Messages
2,524
Reaction score
52
Location
Macon GA
I know this term goes way back, but can somebody tell me why we refer to a canceled launch as "scrubbed"?

Thanks
 

HVArcas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
232
Reaction score
80
Instead of taking up the research of this task, i will punt :)
 

jkovac

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
99
Reaction score
15
Found this on Reddit. There are other explanations offered as well, pretty murky.

The expression is in common use in the Royal Navy and has been for many generations. It derives from the days when all signals and orders were written on a slate. When the signals were cancelled or orders executed, the words on the slate were ‘scrubbed out’ or, equally correctly ‘washed out’.
 

rockladen

Active Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2019
Messages
41
Reaction score
57
Location
Austin, TX
I believe it originates from the Royal Navy way back when procedures, orders, or plans were written on slate. If a procedure was changed, the slate was "scrubbed" clean.
 

HVArcas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
232
Reaction score
80
Found this on Reddit. There are other explanations offered as well, pretty murky.

The expression is in common use in the Royal Navy and has been for many generations. It derives from the days when all signals and orders were written on a slate. When the signals were cancelled or orders executed, the words on the slate were ‘scrubbed out’ or, equally correctly ‘washed out’.
nice! i will remember that for sure
 

PXR5

Starship Hijacker
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 3, 2015
Messages
1,025
Reaction score
396
Location
Monroe, NC
Use scrubbed in a sentence;

I told my wife I have scrubbed my chore of scrubbing the bathtub.
 

ThirstyBarbarian

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
8,164
Reaction score
653
It’s been around for a long, long time. It was used commonly in WWII to mean a mission has been canceled. And it’s used in horse racing to indicate a horse has been canceled from a race. I heard it had to do with naval signals, with orders written on a slate, and if an order was canceled, it was literally scrubbed off the slate. It makes sense to me that the “canceled” meaning is linked to the “cleaned” meaning, and the thing that has been canceled has been cleaned off the schedule.
 

Funkworks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2018
Messages
564
Reaction score
243
Sorry for being that guy but since I couldn't help but going there, I might as well post it:

Etymology:
Borrowing from Middle Dutch schrubben, ‘to scrub’; from Germanic skrubbojanan, ‘to rub, scrub’.
 

KenECoyote

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Mar 19, 2015
Messages
2,682
Reaction score
73
Not having a witty reply was bothering me, but I decided to brush it off.
 

Latest posts

Top