What is happening in Japan?

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That's not necessarily the case now. Why would the unvaccinated in Japan require hospitalization and have deaths at high percapita rate as other locations? Keep in mind that more people are vaccinated there, and have had more rounds of boosters. It's difficult to figure out since the reasoning behind vaccination would point in the opposite direction.
Because other locations are not experiencing a surge, Japan is. Which means a strain may be circulating there and not in other locations. Would be interesting to find out what is the dominant strain of Covid in this situation.
I hope it's not evolving like the flu, where last years' flu shot is ineffective against this years' new strains.
 

KenECoyote

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I hope it's not evolving like the flu, where last years' flu shot is ineffective against this years' new strains.
"In addition, the dangerous new XBB.1.5 variant has also been detected in Japan, believed to be the most immune-evasive strain yet, meaning vaccination and previous infections offer little or no protection."
 
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XBB1.5 is the same variant that rose in the US around Thanksgiving.
But I haven't heard of any big surge in cases or overcrowding in hospitals in the US.
:questions:
 

NateB

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XBB1.5 is the same variant that rose in the US around Thanksgiving.
But I haven't heard of any big surge in cases or overcrowding in hospitals in the US.
:questions:
It's more than just Covid, but every hospital I've been in since Fall has been full. Our ER is often boarding 30-40 admitted patients waiting for beds. I've picked people up at rural hospitals who were waiting in the ERs for 24-36 hours. One doctor told me the patient we were there to get waited 32 hours for a bed and another 16 for transport before they decided to call us.
 

KenECoyote

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XBB1.5 is the same variant that rose in the US around Thanksgiving.
But I haven't heard of any big surge in cases or overcrowding in hospitals in the US.
:questions:

"In early 2023, a new rising Omicron subvariant called XBB.1.5 appears to be the most transmissible strain of the virus so far. Cases are also believed to be rising with people spending more time in doors and attending recent holiday gatherings, with fewer wearing masks and taking other mitigation measures. Experts are still trying to better understand XBB.1.5 and other Omicron subvariants, such as BQ 1.1. and BA.5, which continue to circulate. They are also monitoring more than 300 other descendants of Omicron around the world."
 

KenECoyote

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Somewhat related of concern is that Lunar New Year starts this Sunday and while no longer celebrated in Japan due to the Meiji Revolution, it is the most important holiday in China where families meet and visit relatives. That definitely won't help their recent surge.
 

Pappy

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maybe they work too hard. only half kidding. never been there, but much stuff i've seen about Japan focuses on a work ethic that is tantamount to martial devotion. sleeping in storage containers at work, passing out walking to sharpen a pencil, et al. The substantial physical and mental/emotional stress from these toils does nothing good for one's health. maybe our relative laziness is what's saving us.
 

jderimig

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XBB1.5 is the same variant that rose in the US around Thanksgiving.
But I haven't heard of any big surge in cases or overcrowding in hospitals in the US.
:questions:
Perhaps with the high vaccination rate and one of the highest booster rates in the world Japan has less diversity in immunity functionality than the US population.
 
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Perhaps with the high vaccination rate and one of the highest booster rates in the world Japan has less diversity in immunity functionality than the US population.
Speculative, your honor.
Is the same thing happening in Chile and Cuba, which have higher vaccination rates?
 

jderimig

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jderimig

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Oh, OK.
Also what vaccine are Cuban's vaccinated with?
I would guess the Russian vaccine?
 

Zeus-cat

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I would assume that the Japanese are much more likely to report COVID infections if they are asked to do so. My wife and I tested positive for COVID last month and never reported it to anyone. We were never asked, but we didn't report it if there is a way to do so.
 

speed

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Maybe it has to due with housing density! We found that homes are much safer than apartment buildings as far as transmissible diseases are concerned. Same with transportation, a lone individual is far safer than folks on a train. Japan is population dense.
 

smstachwick

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Maybe it has to due with housing density! We found that homes are much safer than apartment buildings as far as transmissible diseases are concerned. Same with transportation, a lone individual is far safer than folks on a train. Japan is population dense.
America, on the other hand, is population dense. Subtle but important distinction.
 

jderimig

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Here's a quick updated report I found for Japan alone

Here's a quick updated report I found for Japan alone.

View attachment 559409

View attachment 559410
Starting to look better at least.
Bringing this back to the original post, the question I am asking is not the number of deaths but the progressive increase in deaths for each wave. Show below is the Europe, Singapore (another crowded place) and Japan. What is going on with the trend in the deaths per wave there?
Screenshot from 2023-01-26 16-46-33.png
 

KenECoyote

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Bringing this back to the original post, the question I am asking is not the number of deaths but the progressive increase in deaths for each wave. Show below is the Europe, Singapore (another crowded place) and Japan. What is going on with the trend in the deaths per wave there?
View attachment 559599
Good question and I'm at a loss to explain. It'll be interesting to find out when an in-depth article comes out.
 

OverTheTop

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I am guessing people are becoming apathetic towards the disease, with less hand-washing and less mask wearing. Possibly when they do contact the disease they might end up with a higher viral load and worse outcome before the immune response swats it down. Wild guess anyway. I know here we are having about 20 deaths a day (our state) currently. People seem to have moved on from the necessary protections so they can get on with their lives. At least the ones that survive anyway.
 
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Sandy H.

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Bringing this back to the original post, the question I am asking is not the number of deaths but the progressive increase in deaths for each wave. Show below is the Europe, Singapore (another crowded place) and Japan. What is going on with the trend in the deaths per wave there?
View attachment 559599

Interesting observation. I hope a logical and possibly provable answer is determined.

Sandy.
 
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