What Electronics are you all using?

Discussion in 'Rocket Boosted Gliders' started by Andrew_ASC, Dec 22, 2018.

Help Support The Rocketry Forum by donating:

  1. Dec 22, 2018 #1

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    UTC SEDS 2017 3rd/ SEDS 2018 1st

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    Messages:
    3,512
    Likes Received:
    416
    Gender:
    Male
    I’m curious about rocket booster gliders. I have a spectrum DX5e buried away with some L-39 EDF R/c stuff from seemingly nearly a decade ago. Normally I source my R/C, servos ,and batteries from
    Hobbyking.

    Had a Alphajet 64mm EDF at one point, that was the fastest model airplane I’ve handed. It ate a tree on seventh flight out of range, that’s before I bought the DX5e.

    What Tx/Rx combos do you all prefer? Would my setup be adequate for a RBG beginner?

    What brand 10g servos do you all prefer to use in Dynasoar models?
    I dunno sorry for all the questions I’ve been eyeing that Pegasus XL kit for awhile, it would be fun to start somewhere.
     
  2. Dec 23, 2018 #2

    burkefj

    burkefj

    burkefj

    Forum Supporter TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,787
    Likes Received:
    149
    I use a dx8, dx6 will work, gen2 and kater are better. You want something that will do elevon or delta mix AND mix elevator trim to a switch for boost and glide trim, usually via flap setting. I dont know if a dx5 has flap/elevator mix.

    For servos i have used hitec hs55 and hs65hb, i prefer the hb as they repeatably center. The 55 doesnt and about 1/3 are buzzy around center.

    There are cheaper servos, i have not used them. I might in an indoor flyer i didnt care about. In a rocket glider that i cant shut off on boost i use better equipment.

    On my site i list what i know works, people have tried orange rx and tx and had issues.

    In the end you have a $65 kit, a $45 casing and $7 per flight, and the rx/battery cost, saving $10 using cheap servos is not cost effective.

    Ive not used other xmitter brands, the spektrum ar400 rxs weigh 7 grams and thats what i assume for balancing.

    You need to be comfortable with an aileron plane flying at 65mph or so before you consider one, if you were comfortable with the alpha you should be fine.
     
    Andrew_ASC likes this.
  3. Dec 23, 2018 #3

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    UTC SEDS 2017 3rd/ SEDS 2018 1st

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    Messages:
    3,512
    Likes Received:
    416
    Gender:
    Male
    Thanks.
     
  4. Dec 23, 2018 #4

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Pig Soooiiieee!! TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2016
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    127
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Paragould, AR
    To begin, I highly recommend the advice by Frank (aka "burkefj") at Dynasoar Rocketry.

    Here is a link to the Dynasoar "General Info" site:
    https://dynasoarrocketry.com/?page_id=397

    RADIOS [Transmitters]
    I use a Futaba 14SG radio and a Tactic 660 radio (i.e., transmitters). My main interest is scale RC airplanes, and I play with RC rocket gliders when I grow tired of crashing $1,000 & 30 pound RC aircraft, that I have worked on for a year..... :(:(:(

    Futaba is an old, big name in RC aircraft. Their radio systems are very reliable; but they are not easy to program. Been using Futaba since 1992.

    Tactic is a relatively new name in radio systems by Tower Hobbies. Relatively cheap, reliable.....and, in some ways, harder to program than Futaba.

    I worked on a Dept. of Defense research project that used Spectrum radios, and I think Spectrum is your best option.

    NOTE: Most radios today are programmable. They can store the flight settings for several different models (10 or more). In the 'old days', when radios were NOT programmable, all settings were manual.

    The non-programmable radios are still available. They tend to be the CHEAPEST radios. They will work, but only for one model.

    DX5e: My guess is that, with a new transmitter battery (and robbing parts from the L-39 [mine flew awful]), you are good to go.

    SERVOS
    I use Futaba 3114 servos. Roughly equivalent to what Frank recommends.
     
    Andrew_ASC likes this.
  5. Dec 23, 2018 #5

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    Andrew_ASC

    UTC SEDS 2017 3rd/ SEDS 2018 1st

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    Messages:
    3,512
    Likes Received:
    416
    Gender:
    Male
    Right now as a new guy to RBG the concern I have is if my setup can handle elevon mixing. I may need to go digging into the user manuals. I don’t think I’ll need to store a bunch of settings as I typically hand fly the models.
     
  6. Dec 23, 2018 #6

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Pig Soooiiieee!! TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2016
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    127
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Paragould, AR
    RECEIVER BATTERIES
    In the past few years, this has been the 'learning event' for me.

    Most radio receiver and servo systems can handle a voltage of 4.8 volts to 6.0 volts. Most modern systems can now handle up to 7.4 volts.

    As you may know, the world of RC model aircraft has moved into the realm of lipo batteries for power. My 1/4 scale Sopwith Camel uses a 7.4 volt, 2200 mAh battery that goes through a voltage regulator. Plenty of power for dealing with the Hun in the sun, but a bit heavy for model rockets.

    I followed Frank's advice, and I use a 1s 3.7 volt 500 mAh battery for my rockets. These are cheap, and the chargers tend to use a USB port.

    Even though the '1s' battery is rated as 3.7 volts, when fully charged it gives you about 4.2 volts. For the duration of a rocket glider flight, this works fine. The minimum voltage required for most receivers is 3.5 volts (more or less), so you are ok for flight power. Although, plugging in the receiver battery is the last thing I do before launch.
     
    Andrew_ASC likes this.
  7. Dec 23, 2018 #7

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Crawf56

    Pig Soooiiieee!! TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2016
    Messages:
    1,067
    Likes Received:
    127
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Paragould, AR
    Most radios have this option. Even the old ones. But.....

    My Futaba radio handles "servo reversing" in elevon mode very well. Just hit servo reverse for a channel, and it responds as desired.

    But my Tactic radio is more picky. Sometimes I must reverse the plug-ins on the receiver to get aileron/elevator movement like I want on the control stick.
     
  8. Dec 23, 2018 #8

    burkefj

    burkefj

    burkefj

    Forum Supporter TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,787
    Likes Received:
    149
    And by what i meant with i recommend what i know works, is that is what i personally use. Other things may work but i cant guarantee they will program correctly, run on 1s etc and be lightweight. You'd need to experiment. A good radio is a one time investment, like a good altimeter/tracking unit. I want people to have a good successful experience, you can try to do it using older or cheaper stuff of course just be ready. You can fly without elevator glide trim on a switch its just a lot harder for most people to hold the correct up trim on the stick while not stalling and planning your landing. Its like using the correct tool is always easier and faster. You can use a slotted screwdriver on a phillips head, it might work but you will bugger up the screw head. Newer radios have model memory, sim card storage, easy mixing, better batteries etc, electronic trims, it makes setup easy like 20 minutes instead of hours.
     
  9. Dec 23, 2018 #9

    burkefj

    burkefj

    burkefj

    Forum Supporter TRF Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,787
    Likes Received:
    149
  10. Dec 23, 2018 #10

    aerostadt

    aerostadt

    aerostadt

    Lifetime Supporter TRF Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,853
    Likes Received:
    71
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Brigham City, UT
    I was first using the Orange transmitter and rcx, which was cheaper, but the toggle switch for up elevator did not work. So, I now have the Spektrum Dx6e, which works fine. At first I tried the Dx6e with the Orange rcx and found that this was a bad idea. It seemed as if both the transmitter and the rcx became corrupted. So, I went with the Spektrum rcx (AR400) and the compatibility issues went away. Of course, the Spektrum servo's will work with the Dx6e, but I found that they are more expensive. I tried a number of different servo's with the Dx6e system and they seem alright. Recently, I tried some surplus Hitec HS-81's with the Dx6e and they seem to work fine. One has to make settings and test things on the bench before flying.
     
    Andrew_ASC likes this.
  11. Dec 23, 2018 #11

    Zeus-cat

    Zeus-cat

    Zeus-cat

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    4,103
    Likes Received:
    324
    I don't need servos on my boost gliders, I just steer with my feet using pedals. Oh wait, I may be in the wrong thread.
     
    aerostadt and 0011001100 like this.
  12. Dec 23, 2018 #12

    aerostadt

    aerostadt

    aerostadt

    Lifetime Supporter TRF Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,853
    Likes Received:
    71
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Brigham City, UT
    Wrong thread, thankfully.
     

Share This Page