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Cl(VII)

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If anyone isn’t voting to avoid jury duty, it’s kind of a silly. Most states draw from DMV data as well. Never registered to vote, but I’ve done jury duty. Not sure why one would want to avoid it, I learned a lot about how our legal system works and it felt good to help out.
I felt that way too, and I still do to some extent, but I can see where a desire to avoid the entire experience is valid.

I have been called three times, and served on one jury. The trial was for child molestation with a lot of other factors that made it worse than that already horrible accusation. Aside from the alleged molestation, the poor kid had been through so much in their life...every single person who should have been there for this kid after his mother died early in his life abondoned or abused him (physically, emotionally or both) or in the case of his father abused, then abandoned. By the end of it, the entire jury wanted to throw the Father, Grandmother, siblings and at least 2 cousins in jail (none were involved in the accused molestation) because they were that horrible to this kid. In the end, the state couldn't prove the molestation case, so we found the defendant "not guilty"...note, not one of us would have voted "innocent" or "guilty" the evidence just didn't support either. It was the most tragic 2 days I have ever spent, and after the second day is the only time in my life I have gotten drunk in an attempt to cope/forget something (admitedly, this probably means I have lived a charmed life).

Even though I know the system worked as intended (guilty beyond a reasonable doubt or not), and that we the jury did our part honestly and fairly, I still feel somewhat complicit in that child's continued suffering. So yeah, I get having a real desire to avoid jury duty.
 

Antares JS

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Each slave was counted as 3/5ths of a vote, even though they were not allowed to vote.
This is not precisely correct. The section of the constitution that includes "3/5 of all other persons" was about determining population to figure out how many house representatives (and by extension, electoral votes) each state got. It had nothing to do with actual counting of votes. This was a compromise as free states wanted slaves to not count at all, and slave states wanted slaves to count fully.

It's not entirely fair to say four of the first five presidents were Virginian because of this. While Virginia was worth the most electoral votes for the first few elections, New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania were worth a lot of electoral votes as well and could have overruled Virginia, but didn't. A lot of the early election maps have mostly a north/south divide with New England voting one way, Virginia and southward voting the other way, and Pennsylvania and New York being the swing states of their day.
 

cerving

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Isn't Poli Sci fun? :)
 

KC3KNM

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I felt that way too, and I still do to some extent, but I can see where a desire to avoid the entire experience is valid.

I have been called three times, and served on one jury. The trial was for child molestation with a lot of other factors that made it worse than that already horrible accusation. Aside from the alleged molestation, the poor kid had been through so much in their life...every single person who should have been there for this kid after his mother died early in his life abondoned or abused him (physically, emotionally or both) or in the case of his father abused, then abandoned. By the end of it, the entire jury wanted to throw the Father, Grandmother, siblings and at least 2 cousins in jail (none were involved in the accused molestation) because they were that horrible to this kid. In the end, the state couldn't prove the molestation case, so we found the defendant "not guilty"...note, not one of us would have voted "innocent" or "guilty" the evidence just didn't support either. It was the most tragic 2 days I have ever spent, and after the second day is the only time in my life I have gotten drunk in an attempt to cope/forget something (admitedly, this probably means I have lived a charmed life).

Even though I know the system worked as intended (guilty beyond a reasonable doubt or not), and that we the jury did our part honestly and fairly, I still feel somewhat complicit in that child's continued suffering. So yeah, I get having a real desire to avoid jury duty.
To be fair, the vast majority of folks that don’t vote in the hopes of avoiding jury duty likely haven’t had an experience like yours. I’d imagine most haven’t served on a jury, and don’t want to be bothered... especially because not registering to vote doesn’t get you out of jury duty in most states and that’s pretty easy to look up. :)

I wasn’t trying to make it out to be a fun time, it’s a serious responsibility. Things can be both difficult and rewarding, though. Sorry to hear about the rough experience.
 
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