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DavRedf

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Just a thought how about a sticky on virus/security alerts, that way all warnings are at the front and easily seen.
My thinking behind this is that when a virus alert is posted after a time it has migrated down thw page but the threat may be greater than when posted. Plus old virus (virii?) are still in the wild and can be caught and so the information may be needed.

With every geek and his mother writing virus/worms/spyware I think it is a service we need but I dont feel that it needs its own forum.

Just my thoughts on the subject.

Members, Admin ??????

David
 

Elapid

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are unnecessary if you use common sense.
don't open attatchments.
 

DavRedf

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Elapid one word SASSER.
I rest my case.
But thanks for the input as it is usually correct.

David
 

cls

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you can avoid many viruses by not opening attachments, and by not surfing the web, but that is naive: there are quite a few that you can get just by being connected!

TRF is not the right place for virus information. for up-to-date virus info, check out CSRC, and the AV vendor's home pages McAfee and Symantec .

but there are threats other than viruses, CERT covers most of them.
 

n3tjm

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Originally posted by Elapid
are unnecessary if you use common sense.
don't open attatchments.
Sadley that is not the solution anymore. With all the poor programming that Microsoft put into Windows, any thing from documents, and even multimedia files can contain viruse, or links to download viruses.

Lately I have been recieving a lot of e-mails saying that my gardei.com e-mail is down, and givems me a gardei.com/inbox url... but that is a link to a virus.Obviously because gardei.com is my website, and I have no email service. That is called spoofing.

Then they got wiser and wrote a script that tried accessing the url with out you asking...

fortunatly I have Juno, where scripts don't usually work. And when an e-mail does have a script that works, Norton Antivirus is quick to stop it.

Antivirus programs are a must.
 

Elapid

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stupid-*** egotistical reject maybe?
*shrugs*

seriously, i have been online about 8+ hours a day since 1993 and have gotten one virus in that time; from an infected floppy disk. lucky? i guess! i have done the chatroom thing and the warez thing.. kazaa, porn, etc. i do run a virus scanner but with all the cash i have sent their way, all it does is make me FEEL safer, it hasnt stopped any 'attack'. ever. i'm no IT expert, just a guy that spends waaaaaaaaay too much time on the web.

i ust lycos mail and i don't click links, nor do i open spam emails.
some are tricky, but aren't you guys rocket scientists?
;)
 

Elapid

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i mean, you get 3 copies of a virus in your inbox and 12 warnings about the virus from well-meaning friends, etc...

just more clutter.

i only get viruses in my email when i do something incredibly stupid like posting my email address in a public internet forum.
hehehe!
:D

will i NEVER learn?
 

Juaru

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Originally posted by Elapid

seriously, i have been online about 8+ hours a day since 1993 and have gotten one virus in that time; from an infected floppy disk. lucky? i guess![/B]
Lucky is the word. I was like you, happily surfing along, proud of myself for not opening attatchements or being snookered by those fake ebay "send me your password" emails...

Until last week.

My colleague is out of town, and I hopped on his computer to do some work. Low and behold, he hadn't downloaded his windows updates and as soon as I turned the computer on the sasser virus came right in on the DSL line and starting shutting the computer off!

Fortunately, it was easy to fix. This time.

John (not Jon) Arthur

www.JonRocket.com
 

Hospital_Rocket

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If you compute pureley in a home environment, and don't do anything that we it IT call dumb, you can be lucky enough to avid catching most things. Hence, Elapid, you are lucky. There is malignant code out there that can simply activate by going to a web site.

No, you should never open any attachment that you are not expecting.

You should also not allow any web site to install anything you do not fully understand.
 

DavRedf

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TRF is not the right place for virus information. for up-to-date virus info, check out CSRC, and the AV vendor's home pages McAfee and Symantec .

For the third time this year, Internet security company Symantec has had to release patches to plug critical security flaws in many of its popular antivirus and firewall packages.
Security company eEye on Wednesday published details of four security holes that affect a range of Symantec's client-based applications, including Norton Internet Security, Norton AntiVirus and Norton AntiSpam. Symantec has published a security response on its Web site.
Symantec's Guido Sanchidrian, a product manager for antivirus, content filtering and security response, said the company has spent the past month developing fixes for the vulnerabilities and has now made the patches available to its customers.
"Anyone who regularly runs Symantec LiveUpdate should already be protected. However, to be sure, customers should manually run Symantec LiveUpdate," Sanchidrian said.
Philippe Alcoy, senior security consultant at eEye, said the people most at risk are those not protected by a perimeter firewall. This might include people at home, workers at smaller businesses and corporate laptop users not working through their VPNs.
"Most corporate environments have perimeter firewalls, so users behind that are only vulnerable to an internal attack, but users taking laptops home are at risk," Alcoy said.
Of the four flaws, three could allow a hacker to take control of an affected system, while one could be used to force a computer into an infinite loop by simply sending it a specially crafted packet of data.
"That's a big problem if the machine is a mission-critical server," Alcoy said.
The flaws were first reported to Symantec on April 19, which means the company has taken just under a month to develop a patch. According to eEye, this is a "reasonable" amount of time in which to address the vulnerabilities.
In January, Symantec plugged a gap in its LiveUpdate feature that could have allowed hackers to gain administrator rights on an affected PC. Just two months later, the company admitted its Internet Security package contained a back door that could be used by hackers to take control of the machine.
The flaws affect the following packages: Norton Internet Security and Norton Internet Security Professional 2002, 2003 and 2004; Norton Personal Firewall 2002, 2003 and 2004; Symantec Client Firewall 5.01 and 5.1.1; Symantec Client Security 1.0, 1.1 and 2.0 (SCF 7.1) and Norton AntiSpam 2004.
Symantec's Sanchidrian said the company does not believe any of its customers have been affected by the flaws at this time.
 

Steward

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Funny...no one has mentioned TREND MICRO...
I've been really pleased...!!!
 
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