Virus is closing in...

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OverTheTop

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Australia is doing quite well with this COVID thing currently. My wife, a nurse educator, went and did a prac class today which is the first time in ages she has had student interactions that are anything but virtual. Just today it was reported on the news that a patient at an aged-care home had tested positive to the virus. It turns out one of my wife's students works at that nursing home. It is unlikely that the student has it, but possible. That means it is unlikely that my wife has it, but it is possible. Classes cancelled.

That's complicated things a bit for a few days as testing gets done :(
 

David Schwantz

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I told my wife at the end of March that she was not going back in. She got a call this weekend from the supervisor and was told she would not be allowed in the building again. That there are Covid cases all over the plant. Lots are being sent home, haz-mat teams are every where, people are not wearing masks and some that do will not wear them correctly. It is an Aerospace company with government contracts, work told her to apply for FMLA. Now the feds are saying that a weakened immune system is NOT at risk of getting Covid. If she would have stayed working, she would've been dead by now.
 

Bat-mite

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I just had the blood draw for the antibodies test on Thursday. Should know something soon, see if that thing I had back at Christmas and on thru January was COVID-19. Should get results early this week.
 

David Schwantz

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I was in KY in March, sicker than a dog. The office did not want to even load me for fear of my being on road. No idea of Covid at that time.
 

David Schwantz

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A question though. If you have had Covid and now have the antibodies. Can you still spread it?
 

Marc_G

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I'm getting tested for antibodies this week too. Unlikely I had it, but I did have "something" in early March after a business trip. Probably it was just bad airport Panda Express food but I was sick for a couple days
 

Bat-mite

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A question though. If you have had Covid and now have the antibodies. Can you still spread it?
I'm not a doctor, but I would think that if you have the antibodies, then you had the virus, learned how to kill it, and now you don't have the virus. If you don't have it, you can't spread it.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

David Schwantz

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Hi Bat, Thanks, so if you can kill it. When you touch a surface that has it on it, does it now die or can you transfer it to the next thing you touch? I also am no Doc, only know what I read and hear. And sometimes they are 2 different things.
 

Steve Shannon

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Hi Bat, Thanks, so if you can kill it. When you touch a surface that has it on it, does it now die or can you transfer it to the next thing you touch? I also am no Doc, only know what I read and hear. And sometimes they are 2 different things.
I’m not a doctor either, but I have two daughters who are transferring a virus by transferring it from an object is called a fomite. So someone who is shedding could pet the friendly dog at the launch, then the dog could go visit someone else who also pets it and that person could pick it up. Instead of a dog it can be any surface. Viruses live for different lengths of time on different surfaces which can also be affected by environmental factors.
 

Bat-mite

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Hi Bat, Thanks, so if you can kill it. When you touch a surface that has it on it, does it now die or can you transfer it to the next thing you touch? I also am no Doc, only know what I read and hear. And sometimes they are 2 different things.
I don't think my body could possibly kill it if it is outside my body, i.e., on my skin. So yes, I could transmit it that way. But I could not transmit it by breathing on someone, sneezing on someone, etc.
 

pondman

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I just had the blood draw for the antibodies test on Thursday. Should know something soon, see if that thing I had back at Christmas and on thru January was COVID-19. Should get results early this week.
Wife and I had tests last week as we were both very sick in early March; thought it may have been COVID-19. Both tests came back negative.......
 

David Schwantz

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If you had it in early March, and is now gone, should it NOT be negative?
 

Bat-mite

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Wife and I had tests last week as we were both very sick in early March; thought it may have been COVID-19. Both tests came back negative.......
Annnnnnnnnnndddd ... I got my results. negative for antibodies. Bummer. :(
 

Kelly

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I'm not a doctor, but I would think that if you have the antibodies, then you had the virus, learned how to kill it, and now you don't have the virus. If you don't have it, you can't spread it.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.
The jury is still out on whether someone who had the virus but recovered is now immune, or can still get it and/or spread it.

 

FMarvinS

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The way it goes is as follows: After virus exposure, the RT-PCR test will detect virus from either nasopharyngeal or direct pharyngeal swabs. The serology is initially IgM after approximately 7 days of illness from a blood sample and this is followed by an IgG response detectable at about 14 to 21 days onward. The RT-PCR is most reliable during day 1 to 5.5 after virus exposure; however, its accuracy drops to 54% (in some studies) after 14 days. Its been proposed that the use of the Antibody and RT-PCR together during week 1 yields a 98.6% accuracy. The Antibody test in one study was 89 to 90% accurate in week 2 after exposure. So the presence of IgG anti-COVID-19 antibody in a patient's serum suggests possible (but not fully proven) immunity. However, the patient can still shed virus while they make IgG for up to 37 days well into the period of IgG synthesis. So more studies need to be completed to detect not only the presence of IgG but the therapeutic concentration required to facilitate passive immunity to a patient receiving convalescent plasma. Also, please remember that viral shedding can occur simultaneously with IgG synthesis; so, both test types are recommended after 3 weeks or so of disease to discern potential plasma donors who are not shedding virus at that time. I hope this info helps.
Fred, L2
ICBM, Camden, S.C.
KG4YGP
 

David Schwantz

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I guess this is part of the problem. I only know what I have read. But I do not know WHAT I just read! I would have to guess that most people have no idea of what you are saying. At least, I don't.
 

FMarvinS

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David-sorry for the ambiguity. what the above encapsulates is the relative effective period that each type of test (nasal swab-PCR or blood antibody test) is relatively accurate during different phases of COVID-19 illness. For example, Bat-Mite was ill during Dec/Jan and if he got the swab test now (in May) it would not represent viral presence; however, the IgG antibody test might still be detectable suggesting that in the past he was exposed. In a similar way, in March when you were ill, if your doctor sent you to an ER for testing, they would probably have done the swab test which is pretty accurate during the initial week or so of illness. If it had been greater than a couple of weeks when you called the doctor-then they could have arranged both tests (since after approx. 14 days the antibody tests may be more accurate) . Finally, if one did have the illness, then after disease symptom resolution, is it safe to go back to work? To answer that question, the IgG antibody test might be done to demonstrate the presence of IgG -i.e.- possible immunity. But if less than 2 months from the inception of illness, then the swab test might also be done to rule/out viral shedding before going back to work. Hopefully this is a little more clear.
 

manixFan

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Here’s a good article on testing, false positives, what it means:


There appears to be a high rate of false negatives with some of the antibody tests.

Tony
 
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