USR Sonic 2200

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jetra2

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Yet another thread praising USR's kits...Thanks Jerry!

I ordered a Sonic 2200 from Jerry via Instaship last Thursday morning (10am-ish EST). On Saturday, I had a box. Darn speedy shipping!

In the box was a great-looking kit. Based around the 2.25" tube, the Sonic 2200 is a two-stage model utilizing Discontinuous Staging. It will stand either 51" or 56" inches tall, depending on if you look at the catalog or the instructions. Slight typo, Jerry?

Here is the description from the USR catalog:

SONIC 2200 is U.S. Rockets sounding rocket vehicle. Designed to accept rated power well in excess of model rocket limitations, Sonic 2200 is a screamer. Classic "California" styling and Discontinuous Staging(tm) provide a stable design and booster parachute recovery capability unique to U.S. Rockets products. Try F80-4 to G60-8.

Droool....I liked the sound of that! At $49.95, the price was reasonable because of the pay-as-you-go program that Jerry allows his customers to do. This really works out for me well, because I get small(ish) week-to-week paychecks and paying $5-$10 dollars a week via Paypal fits my budget!

Reading through the instructions, I noticed one thing. These instructions are WAY out of date. They talk about using Thermalite fuses and the like to ignite the sustainer. This product is no longer available to the average consumer, which is my only qualm with the kit. Jerry really needs to update these instructions to the Age of On-Board Electronics. I'm gonna deduct 1/2 point from it for this.

It'll be a relatively easy mod to make to hold my timer in the payload section of the sustainer, but I would've liked some sort of insert on how to mod the kit for that.

More later - lemme start building!

Jason
 
Originally posted by jetra2
Yet another thread praising USR's kits...Thanks Jerry!
In the box was a great-looking kit. Based around the 2.25" tube, the Sonic 2200 is a two-stage model utilizing Discontinuous Staging. It will stand either 51" or 56" inches tall, depending on if you look at the catalog or the instructions. Slight typo, Jerry?

I want to address this issue. Over the years these 2.25" kits have used a variety of nose cones. As such the length and CP values were based on the nose cone in use at the time the instructions were created. Keep in mind this is a product that has been on the market some 18-20 years.

An effort has been undertaken to standardize nose cones, plan going forward to the same shapes on any production increases and to conform all instructions, catalogs and web pages to the "new" standards going forward. The VENDOR thread on new USR links shows some of those updates as they occur. Some kits have a large book of printed materials and others not, as things move forward increased standardization and accuracy will creep in.

Given this effort only was initiated a year ago, there is an estimated 3 year period until 80% of the line conforms.

In the mean time comments such as this will be put on the product specific website to address interim discrepencies and customer feedback.

Jerry
 
Originally posted by jetra2

Reading through the instructions, I noticed one thing. These instructions are WAY out of date. They talk about using Thermalite fuses and the like to ignite the sustainer. This product is no longer available to the average consumer, which is my only qualm with the kit.

THERMALITE IS STILL AVAILABLE AT LAUNCHES. IT HAS BEEN RECOMMENDED AS AN IGNITER IN SO MANY MODEL ROCKET MOTORS IT IS CLEARLY EXEMPT (FOR THAT USE) EVEN BY THE EVIL ATF.

Being "Class C" you can hold it, transport it, just not mail or ship it. There are exceptions to that too.

Jerry
 
Alright...sheesh! My mistake. I mean it is not normally widely available, and people won't know whether or not to buy it, so they'll build a timer or electronics bay to start the sustainer.

BTW, I'm in discussions with Daveyfire to fly this sucker on a H to H combo at BALLS this year for a 8000-10000 foot flight! :D

Jason
 
Originally posted by jetra2
Alright...sheesh! My mistake. I mean it is not normally widely available, and people won't know whether or not to buy it, so they'll build a timer or electronics bay to start the sustainer.

Let's be clear. I ALSO agree with you.

Jerry
 
Ladies and Gentlemen,

May I present to you the USR Sonic 2200 in it unfinished but displayable phase. Thank you all for your patience in this project, we here at Jason Toft Rocketry Online have not had a chance to work on it with all our other projects in the works. Currently the exterior is complete and ready for finishing, whilst the interior still needs more tinkering. More pictures to come as the build progresses, but enjoy this sneak preview.

Jason Toft
NAR 82997
Team Tour de Deuce
 
Nice work Jason! I can't remember...are you going to fly it somewhere this month or are you saving it for NEFAR in March?
 
First Flight is planned for Saturday, March 12th. Hopefully F50-4T to F25-9W. I'll be using my XAVIEN XDSRT-1 to ignite the F25 at 2 seconds.

Jason
 
Current weight before any fillets or fillers and no electronics bay is 14.8 ounces.

Anticipating a dry weight of approximately 20 ounces.

Jason
 
Jason,

Don't forget to post the pics with your timer :D

Good luck!

Best regards,
Steve
 
Steve,

How do you recommend I mount the electronics in this bird? I've never build an electronics bay before. I'm sure the timer would fit nicely into the coupler, I'm just not sure how to go about building it. Any thoughts?

Jason
 
Jason,

Look at www.boosterworks.com at their electronics bays drawings. Art has a simple design that looks easily enough to adapt for your needs (you could get most of the parts at Home Depot or Lowes). What will you be using the timer for exactly? The application may vary the location and mounting options. Two of the most important things I can tell you is to make sure the battery and timer is held secure and that the timer is protected from ejection charge. It is good practice to clean the electronics (whoever makes them) used in rocketry with >90%alcohol to get all the residue off. The most common places for electronics is a bay designed into an area by the fins or designed into a coupler. The coupler should be fine, just try to make sure the weight of the electronics bay is distributed evenly however you do it.

Steve
 
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