3D Printing Using Nylon or Nylon with Carbon Fiber

shawn_rocket

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I have access to a 3D printer that can print Nylon. Has anyone used nylon for rocketry? Seems like it would be ideal in terms of strength and heat resistance. I wouldn't use the carbon fiber for nose cones, but it would seem it may be good for fins, centering rings and motor tubes.
 

Dugway

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I use nylon filament in my CR-10s Pro v2, primarily for electronics sleds where I want the extra strength. I use the same settings that I use for PETG and it comes out great.
 

ShadowSpire48

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Nylon is strong and definitely use it if you can. Carbon fiber in a filament has no structural advantages at all, it's just for color. It doesn't even look like carbon fiber. The only thing you'd get out of it is a very worn down nozzle. Never ever 3D print a motor tube. No filament can handle the heat and you'd be hard pressed to find a RSO that would even allow it to fly.
 

shawn_rocket

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I know they also make a filament with copper powder in it. I haven't weighed it against like prints, but it feels heavier for sure and even will develop a patina like copper roofs/guttering do.
 

alexzogh

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Nylon is strong and definitely use it if you can. Carbon fiber in a filament has no structural advantages at all, it's just for color. It doesn't even look like carbon fiber. The only thing you'd get out of it is a very worn down nozzle. Never ever 3D print a motor tube. No filament can handle the heat and you'd be hard pressed to find a RSO that would even allow it to fly.


Real-world testing indicates this isn't accurate.


Another good video on the subject -

There are about 15 other cf filament tests on youtube, all come to the same conclusion. Increases tensile strength dramatically, but significantly reduces ductility.
 

shockie

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Nylon is strong and definitely use it if you can. Carbon fiber in a filament has no structural advantages at all, it's just for color. It doesn't even look like carbon fiber.

This is just so wrong.

Carbon Fiber has no structural advantage?

Why do you think they put chopped up carbon fiber in plastics in the 1st place?

Because they introduce structural advantages and benefits to the combined. material. Synergy.

MY comment on whether it would make a good motor material. Probably not.
It wouldn't hurt to consider PC/CF, or PEKK/CF.

But then you gotta have a drying box, a heated enclosure and be able to print at 290C to 340C. Ouch
 

shawn_rocket

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So it seems to me that NylonX (which I mentioned in my original post, Nylon with carbon fiber) is stronger than most in the above videos. It also seems superior to PLA and PETG in both types of engineering strengths...
 
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The results you get will depend on which exact product you use. There is no doubt that adding CF or GF will make it stronger if it's actual fibre in it. However as was shown in the various videos the mode of failure tends toward a complete failure once you get to that point. Like all material properties an increase in one may result in a change for the worse in others.
The CF ABS I tried was definately stronger but also was softer. Easier to cut with a knife. With extruded plastic and smallish nozzles there's a limit to the length of fibre you can get. Having said that I've also seen some of the more exotic filaments that say they have a continuous strand through it. This would be a challenge to print with as any lift of the nozzle would be interesting.
I note that most manufacturers of reinforced filament recommend a 0.5 or 0.6 nozzle to avoid clogging.
When I changed back to standard ABS the print was blackish for a loooooooong time.
Norm
 

shockie

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So it seems to me that NylonX (which I mentioned in my original post, Nylon with carbon fiber) is stronger than most in the above videos. It also seems superior to PLA and PETG in both types of engineering strengths...
Only problem that I have with NylonX is it absorbs moisture from the air so you definitely have to dry it out before use. Like 4 hrs at what ? 60C?

Plus a heated or unheated enclosure is recommended during the print.

Otherwise you will lose a substantial(?)amount of the products abilities.
 

shawn_rocket

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Only problem that I have with NylonX is it absorbs moisture from the air so you definitely have to dry it out before use. Like 4 hrs at what ? 60C?

Plus a heated or unheated enclosure is recommended during the print.

Otherwise you will lose a substantial(?)amount of the products abilities.
I agree. My brother has several different 3D printers; he told me that Nylon is tough stuff and relatively heat resistant, and NylonX even more so. He knows all the ins and outs of printing and curing different materials. I have a Voxelab that prints PLA and PETG pretty well. I was just curious if anyone was familiar with Nylon as it's strength profile seems like a match for rocketry.
 

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