Universe shouldn’t exist, CERN physicists conclude

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Winston

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Universe shouldn’t exist, CERN physicists conclude
23 October, 2017

https://cosmosmagazine.com/physics/universe-shouldn-t-exist-cern-physicists-conclude

Excerpt:

One of the great mysteries of modern physics is why antimatter did not destroy the universe at the beginning of time.

To explain it, physicists suppose there must be some difference between matter and antimatter – apart from electric charge. Whatever that difference is, it’s not in their magnetism, it seems.

Physicists at CERN in Switzerland have made the most precise measurement ever of the magnetic moment of an anti-proton – a number that measures how a particle reacts to magnetic force – and found it to be exactly the same as that of the proton but with opposite sign. The work is described in Nature.

“All of our observations find a complete symmetry between matter and antimatter, which is why the universe should not actually exist,” says Christian Smorra, a physicist at CERN’s Baryon–Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) collaboration. “An asymmetry must exist here somewhere but we simply do not understand where the difference is.”

Antimatter is notoriously unstable – any contact with regular matter and it annihilates in a burst of pure energy that is the most efficient reaction known to physics. That’s why it was chosen as the fuel to power the starship Enterprise in Star Trek.

The standard model predicts the Big Bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter – but that’s a combustive mixture that would have annihilated itself, leaving nothing behind to make galaxies or planets or people.

To explain the mystery, physicists have been playing spot the difference between matter and antimatter – searching for some discrepancy that might explain why matter came to dominate.

So far they’ve performed extremely precise measurements for all sort of properties: mass, electric charge and so on, but no difference has yet been found.


Test equipment to drool over:

171023-BASE-Full.jpg
 
The universe shouldn’t exist interesting. Perhaps the physicists at cern do not have a clue as to how things work. Maybe their models show a significant lack of understanding-it is just a model after all


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The universe shouldn’t exist interesting. Perhaps the physicists at cern do not have a clue as to how things work. Maybe their models show a significant lack of understanding-it is just a model after all


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There indeed is a chance that we have no idea how things work.

The issue is that the models describing the universe fit all the data that we've been able to gather, and have, after their creation, been supported by the new information we've gathered.
 
The universe shouldn’t exist interesting. Perhaps the physicists at cern do not have a clue as to how things work. Maybe their models show a significant lack of understanding-it is just a model after all.
Yep, how long ago was it that we thought we understood 100% what made up the universe and then discovered that we don't know anything about 95% of it (dark matter, dark energy). As I've heard scientists say and agree with, it's even more fascinating to find that we're totally wrong about something than it is to find we're right because then it's a fun new mystery and puzzle to solve.
 
There indeed is a chance that we have no idea how things work.

The issue is that the models describing the universe fit all the data that we've been able to gather, and have, after their creation, been supported by the new information we've gathered.

I understand the idea of theory.


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Yep, how long ago was it that we thought we understood 100% what made up the universe and then discovered that we don't know anything about 95% of it (dark matter, dark energy). As I've heard scientists say and agree with, it's even more fascinating to find that we're totally wrong about something than it is to find we're right because then it's a fun new mystery and puzzle to solve.

Absolutely true.


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Well, whenever incongruous data like this surfaces, to my mind it just means we aren’t yet knowledgeable of what the correct question to ask was in the first place.

Douglas Adams had more smarts then I think we gave him credit for...

Besides, often we forget that 2+2 *can* equal 5..

(for very large values of 2 that is...)


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