Tyndall Air Force Base, Home Of F-22 Training, Took Bullseye Hit From Michael

Discussion in 'The Watering Hole' started by Winston, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. Oct 11, 2018 #1

    Winston

    Winston

    Winston

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  2. Oct 11, 2018 #2

    Winston

    Winston

    Winston

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    What I worry about are any unflyable F-22s left behind in hangars. We don't have any F-22s to spare.

    The U.S. Air Force evacuated numerous fighter aircraft from the Florida Gulf Coast in advance of imminent landfall of Hurricane Michael. The evacuation was part of a safe-haven pre-planned protocol. F-22 Raptors, F-16 Fighting Falcons, F-15 Strike Eagles and F-35 Lighting II's from Tyndall and Eglin Air Force Base, FL were flown to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH on October, 9, 2018.

     
  3. Oct 11, 2018 #3

    Winston

    Winston

    Winston

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    Click on link to Tweet to see video of damage:

    "Tyndall Air Force Base suffered extreme damage from Hurricane Michael as it came ashore. Nearly every structure on base suffered roofing damage according to the base commander."

    https://twitter.com/ZachWPDE/status/1050400087476703232
     
  4. Oct 11, 2018 #4

    timbucktoo

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    well the important thing is did they move all aircraft to another base? That's what they normally do!
     
  5. Oct 12, 2018 #5

    grouch

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    Those jets would have been long gone by the time Mike was just a gleam in daddy's eye.
     
  6. Oct 12, 2018 #6

    Winston

    Winston

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    Everything but the non-flyable ones undergoing maintenance which, unfortunately, included some F-22s although the damage to the hangar with the F-22 in the photo below doesn't look that bad. I'm sure they were smart and put the F-22s in the probably newer hangar(s) most likely to survive, perhaps ones built with hurricanes in mind.:

    Note that in the clip we see QF-16s and Mu-2s shoved into one another inside one of the base's large and now roofless hangars. Many F-22s, T-38s, and QF-16s, as well as other aircraft that call the base home, were able to escape to areas unaffected by the storm, but some were also left behind because they were not capable of flight. Major damage to F-22s, which have become something akin to priceless treasures within the USAF due to the fact that only about 187 of them exist, in particular, would be most troubling. Three of the stealth super-fighters have already been damaged during landing incidents in just the last six months. With every F-22 sidelined, more pressure is put on the relatively tiny remaining force.





    [​IMG]

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    Static display F-15:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Oct 13, 2018 #7

    Winston

    Winston

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    Tyndall Air Force Base a ‘Complete Loss’ Amid Questions About Stealth Fighters

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/11/us/air-force-hurricane-michael-damage.html

    Tyndall is home to 55 F-22 stealth fighters, which cost a dizzying $339 million each. Before the storm, the Air Force sent at least 33 of the fighters to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

    Air Force officials have not disclosed the whereabouts of the remaining 22 planes, other than to say that a number of aircraft were left at the base because of maintenance or safety reasons.

    An Air Force spokeswoman, Maj. Malinda Singleton, would not confirm that any of the aircraft left behind were F-22s.

    The high-tech F-22 is notoriously finicky and not always flight-worthy. An Air Force report this year found that on average, only about 49 percent of F-22s were mission ready at any given time — the lowest rate of any fighter in the Air Force. The total value of the 22 fighters that may remain at Tyndall is about $7.5 billion.
     
  8. Oct 14, 2018 #8

    Winston

    Winston

    Winston

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    Setting The Record Straight On Why Fighter Jets Can't All Simply Fly Away To Escape Storms
    Outrage over F-22s left behind at Tyndall AFB as Michael hit and statements saying they should have all been flown away are divorced from reality
    13 Oct 2018

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zon...ets-cant-all-simply-fly-away-to-escape-storms

    Excerpt:

    F-22s are a woefully scarce and finite commodity within the USAF. Any loss, or even damage, to a Raptor is a significant event that has a real impact on the total force. But there is no getting around it, there will likely be substantial losses of not just Raptors but also T-38A Talon aggressors and Mu-2 radar operator training aircraft, not to mention QF-16s, due to Michael. When it comes to the QF-16s, the USAF spent millions per airframe turning those jets into full-scale aerial targets (FSATs) fairly recently. They can fly for years with or without a pilot in the cockpit after going through that conversion, so losing a number of them is not just some trivial thing and those airframes are badly needed for critical weapons testing and development purposes.

    So, let's debate the logic of basing these types of assets in major hurricane zones. Let's debate building at least one large hangar facility on at-risk bases that can withstand Mother Nature's most powerful onslaughts so that unflyable aircraft and critical gear have a place to safely ride out a storm. Let's also debate the readiness of our air combat fleets and the service's funding priorities in relation to those issues.
     

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