Tool Help: Porter Cable Drill Press

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mogibb1

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I purchased the drill press from Lowes years ago (floor model) and haven't really used it much. I am now getting to where I'd like to turn pens and ornaments, etc. I've noticed that when I get the drill to it's max depth, it will shift to the left a little. It drills straight until all the way down and then slightly shifts. It slightly oversizes the hole on the bottom of the work piece. I am not mechanically inclined, but would like to figure this out and see if it's something I can repair myself. Any suggestions or ideas is greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

rharshberger

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Look up some of the various machinist forum, there are mods that will help, but drill presses are not meant to have side loads, their bearings are meant for straight in and ou cuts. For about the same money as modding your drill press you can buy a cheap/used lathe or pen lathe. The side ways movement at the end of the stroke is has several possible causes bearing/shaft wear/sloppiness being one.
 

Zeus-cat

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rharshberger is correct, I ended up ruining a Craftsman bench top drill press by pressing against the sanding drums too aggressively. I bent the shaft and now it is just a hunk of scrap metal.
 

prfesser

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Look up some of the various machinist forum, there are mods that will help, but drill presses are not meant to have side loads, their bearings are meant for straight in and ou cuts. For about the same money as modding your drill press you can buy a cheap/used lathe or pen lathe. The side ways movement at the end of the stroke is has several possible causes bearing/shaft wear/sloppiness being one.
Agreed. And there's a real hazard to beware when turning stuff (or milling) on a drill press. Most of them have a chuck that is held by a Morse taper or other taper. To insert the chuck, the hole and the taper are both wiped scrupulously clean, then the chuck is inserted with a sharp snap of the wrist. (If it doesn't stay in, either there's wear, galling, or it's not clean) There is no drawbar holding that Morse taper in place, so it can come out when turning or milling with the drill. When a chuck spinning at 2000 rpm comes loose, it can be a Very Bad Thing.

Best -- Terry
 

Mike Helm

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You might try adjusting your depth stop so the spindle can't go all the way down. This will limit the size of your work piece but it should give you better performance. Your shaft is likely splined and as you get near the end there's not enough overlap to keep it aligned.
 

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