TiteBond III

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Woody's Workshop

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Anyone use TiteBond III in building a rocket?
I have a 8oz bottle with about 6 oz in it left from my wood shop.
I want to use it up before it jells.
If you used it, like on fillets, how did it sand?
I'm trying a test area, but I thought and see if there were any input.
 

Peter Olivola

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I use it. Been building everything from 1/4A up to and including my Level 2 cert attempt which was successfully test launched on an I-500. It seems to produce less distortion where the centering rings are position in the airframe. It does grab, so be aware and plan accordingly. I try to build without needing to sand adhesives so I can't really answer that question. I've only had to do some touch up sanding of small drips. It's sanding. I hate sanding.
 

The_Lone_Beagle

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^ ditto above. It dries without appreciably shrink in the glued areas (unlike Titebond II).

I think it sands reasonably ok, I tend to use the Titebond Mold & Trim (or whatever it is called today) for my fillets, so maybe I'm not the best person to answer that.
 

rharshberger

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The main diiference between the two Titebonds ( II and III) is that III is more water proof than I and II, my experience has been they are very similar in properties but TBIII is darker in color than TBII when dried. TBIII is also more expensive.
 

Woody's Workshop

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I sanded some last night.
I coated the bevels on the Bullpup fins, didn't like the way it sanded there, kind of rubbery.
Sanded the BT for the scrambler, and it sanded real nice. Better than the TB II.
I haven't sanded fillets yet, got too tired last night.
But that will come today.
Cost difference in my area here in Michigan is about $8 a gallon.
But I still have 1/2 gallon of TB II left from my wood shop so I won't need any real soon.
For now, I think I will be using it to glue in Engine mounts, couplers and baffles.
It does shrink a lot less than TB II, so the ring dimple at the centering ring should be far less than with TB II.
I'll still coat the inside/outside with TB II. I like how much stronger the BT's are, and the fire protection from ejection charges.
I'll post more on sanding the fillets later. They are quite thick, so since TB III advertises longer open time I'll assume it takes longer to fully cure.
 

seth_cooper

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For me, Cardboard+plywood = Titebond III

I built a LOC Big Nuke for my L2 using Titebond III only.
 

Nytrunner

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For me, Cardboard+plywood = Titebond III

I built a LOC Big Nuke for my L2 using Titebond III only.
What were the thrust loads you put on that L2 rocket, and did you do multiple applications to build up the joints?
 

seth_cooper

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What were the thrust loads you put on that L2 rocket, and did you do multiple applications to build up the joints?
J350

I used the double dip method or whatever it's called. Apply glue to the joint, remove the part, apply another bit of glue and secure the parts together.
 

Woody's Workshop

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Sanded the fillets I tried TB III on, can't say it was much difference.
Probably should have let it cure a little longer.
Heated up quick and become rubber too fast.
I do like how it builds up faster due to less shrinkage.
I'll have to buy a qt. and do a whole rocket kit with it to get a proper time frame for curing.
I did sand really smooth on a BT, and where it would have taken 2 coats of TB II, TB III did it in one due to less shrinkage.
 

The_Lone_Beagle

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Yes, I like it so much, I use it for all my builds now, at least the paper & wood types.

Funny, initially I told myself I wouldn't spend the extra $ for it, but it is so much better than Elmer's & Titebond II, but not I just feel like I was an idiot & should have tried it sooner.
 

Trident

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I have yet to try Titebond III. I'm a woodworker as well as a rocket builder, so I'll have to try it. I've sworn by Titebond II (really, any PVA/carpenters glue) for all my woodworking and LPR builds. I use epoxy for a couple things -- motor mounts, where white or carpenters glues can swell the body tube, and for some fin fillets, like a V-2 where you have wood meeting plastic. I also use minimal fillets, dipping a finger in DNA or lacquer thinner to wipe the fillet to leave a relatively small and smooth fillet that needs minimal sanding, if any. For regular cardboard to wood fillets, I swear by the Titebond Molding and Trim glue (cannot remember the new name).
 

rharshberger

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I have yet to try Titebond III. I'm a woodworker as well as a rocket builder, so I'll have to try it. I've sworn by Titebond II (really, any PVA/carpenters glue) for all my woodworking and LPR builds. I use epoxy for a couple things -- motor mounts, where white or carpenters glues can swell the body tube, and for some fin fillets, like a V-2 where you have wood meeting plastic. I also use minimal fillets, dipping a finger in DNA or lacquer thinner to wipe the fillet to leave a relatively small and smooth fillet that needs minimal sanding, if any. For regular cardboard to wood fillets, I swear by the Titebond Molding and Trim glue (cannot remember the new name).
TMTG is now Titebond No Run No Drip iirc, I have used TBIII on quite a few woodworking projects, but I rarely sand it directly as I use cabinet scrapers to remove any dried squeeze out, it has a higher tensile strength than the other TB's and a longer open time. It still seizes on cardboard couplers just like the other wood glues. Personally I have observed no more or less shrinkage than the other TB aliphatic wood glues, that may be due to the fact that all my CRs fit snuggly to the airframes and motor tubes.
 

samb

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I sanded some last night.
I coated the bevels on the Bullpup fins, didn't like the way it sanded there, kind of rubbery.
Sanded the BT for the scrambler, and it sanded real nice. Better than the TB II.
I haven't sanded fillets yet, got too tired last night.
But that will come today.
Cost difference in my area here in Michigan is about $8 a gallon.
But I still have 1/2 gallon of TB II left from my wood shop so I won't need any real soon.
For now, I think I will be using it to glue in Engine mounts, couplers and baffles.
It does shrink a lot less than TB II, so the ring dimple at the centering ring should be far less than with TB II.
I'll still coat the inside/outside with TB II. I like how much stronger the BT's are, and the fire protection from ejection charges.
I'll post more on sanding the fillets later. They are quite thick, so since TB III advertises longer open time I'll assume it takes longer to fully cure.
You've mentioned this technique a few times now and I'm fascinated. You coat the external surface of a cardboard airframe with wood glue, correct ? I've done inside applications using Elmer's GlueAll or generic Dollar store white glue (cheaper than TB) for the same strength and protection benefits that you mention. I would never have thought to do it on the outside and can't recall ever seeing anyone else describe the same process. Do you have any build pictures ?
 
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