Tips designing a rocket?

Discussion in 'Low Power Rocketry (LPR)' started by The Rocketeer, Aug 3, 2018.

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  1. Aug 3, 2018 #1

    The Rocketeer

    The Rocketeer

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    Hello,
    I am new to this website and if it's alright I would like some tips designing my first scratch build rocket.
    I have an open rocket file attached and all comments are appreciated. I want for the Apolapse to be 150-175 ft on a B4-4 motor and good stability. all ideas are welcome.
    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Aug 4, 2018 #2

    Zeus-cat

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    I think you mean apogee. Apogee is the highest altitude a rocket reaches before it starts coming back down.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2018 #3

    Rex R

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    my goodness that is a heavy rocket. better choice of motor would be B6-2 (80)' or the C6-3(200'). the C5-3 is not sold any more. your choice of materials is not exactly the best choice for a low power rocket.
    Rex
     
  4. Aug 5, 2018 #4

    JohnCoker

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  5. Aug 5, 2018 #5

    jlabrasca

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  6. Aug 7, 2018 #6

    lakeroadster

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    Tips for your 1st scratch built rocket.. Keep It Simple. Using a paper based body tube, balsa fins and other paper based components like engine mounts, etc means wood glue will give you very strong joints.

    Also, a good vendor for materials is Balsa Machining Service. They have everything you need and the prices are very reasonable. https://www.balsamachining.com/

    Check out build threads here on TRF for inspiration...

    And as a final note: Let us know more about your experience, that helps us to give you advice that's more in line with your experience level.
     
  7. Aug 7, 2018 #7

    OverTheTop

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    One tip I would suggest is to make the fins not hang back behind the aft end of the rocket. They need to be a bit bigger if they are further forward but they are less likely to snap on a landing with a sub-optimal chute deployment.
     
  8. Aug 8, 2018 #8

    BABAR

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    Great tip. Plus swept forward fins look cool!
     
  9. Aug 8, 2018 #9

    OverTheTop

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    If you are going to go for a forward-swept design remember that fin flutter is more of a risk.
     
    rscaletta likes this.
  10. Aug 8, 2018 #10

    dr wogz

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    And, don't forget 'grain direction' on your fins. many "newbies" (sorry!) seem to forget that the wood grain must be parallel the leading edge for strength & stiffness. (Plywood not so much..)
     
  11. Aug 30, 2018 #11

    OverTheTop

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    How'd you go with the design on this?
     

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