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The most beautiful jet fighter ever made

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Winston

Lorenzo von Matterhorn
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This Is The Most Stunning Photo Of A B-1B Bomber Night Launch We've Ever Seen
The image masterly captures the elegant and ferocious qualities of the B-1B, especially when its four turbofans at roaring away in full afterburner.
AUGUST 7, 2020



 

Winston

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Tandem seating cockpit ala F-111. Nice lines and I like the paint scheme.

Sukhoi Su-34




Air show demo:










Sukhoi Su-34


First flight: 13 April 1990
Introduction: 20 March 2014
Produced: 2006–present
Number built: 135


Incredibly detailed examination:

Sukhoi Su-34 Fullback
Russia's New Heavy Strike Fighter

Technical Report APA-TR-2007-0108
by Dr Carlo Kopp, AFAIAA, SMIEEE, PEng
January, 2007
Updated October, 2008
Updated January, 2011
Updated April, 2012


 

Winston

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Russia's stealth fighter - Su-57/T-50S

Check Out These Images Of Russia's Second (production run) Su-57 Felon Fighter Under Construction
The latest Felon was shown off on Air Force Day in Russia, months after the first production aircraft crashed.
AUGUST 12, 2020








Russian Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu, in the green uniform, takes a closer look at the cockpit of T-50S-2:



Sergey is always such a cheerful guy. Dated 2014.:



Sukhoi Su-57


First flight: 29 January 2010
Introduction: 2020 (planned)
Number built: 11 (10 test and 1 serial) as of 2019

The fighter is designed to have supercruise, supermaneuverability, stealth, and advanced avionics to overcome the prior generation fighter aircraft as well as ground and naval defences. The Su-57 is intended to succeed the MiG-29 and Su-27 in the Russian Air Force.

The prototypes and initial production batch are to be delivered with a highly upgraded Lyulka AL-31 variant, the AL-41F1, as an interim powerplant while an advanced clean-sheet design engine, currently designated the izdeliye 30, is in final stages of development and expected to be available after mid-2020s. The aircraft is expected to have a service life of up to 35 years.
 

Winston

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The US Air Force’s radical plan for a future fighter could field a jet in 5 years
16 Sep 2019


WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force is preparing to radically alter the acquisition strategy for its next generation of fighter jets, with a new plan that could require industry to design, develop and produce a new fighter in five years or less.

On Oct. 1, the service will officially reshape its next-generation fighter program, known as Next Generation Air Dominance, or NGAD, Will Roper, the Air Force’s acquisition executive, said during an exclusive interview with Defense News.

Under a new office headed by a yet-unnamed program manager, the NGAD program will adopt a rapid approach to developing small batches of fighters with multiple companies, much like the Century Series of aircraft built in the 1950s, Roper said.

Instead of maturing technologies over time to create an exquisite fighter, the Air Force’s goal would be to quickly build the best fighter that industry can muster over a couple years, integrating whatever emerging technology exists. The service would downselect, put a small number of aircraft under contract and then restart another round of competition among fighter manufacturers, which would revise their fighter designs and explore newer leaps in technology.

The result would be a networked family of fighters — some more interrelated than others — developed to meet specific requirements and including best-in-breed technologies aboard a single airframe. One jet might be optimized around a revolutionary capability, like an airborne laser. Another fighter might prioritize state-of-the-art sensors and include artificial intelligence. One might be an unmanned weapons truck.

But the point, Roper said, is that instead of trying to hone requirements to meet an unknown threat 25 years into the future, the Air Force would rapidly churn out aircraft with new technologies — a tactic that could impose uncertainty on near-peer competitors like Russia and China and force them to deal with the U.S. military on its own terms.

Imagine “every four or five years there was the F-200, F-201, F-202 and it was vague and mysterious [on what the planes] have, but it’s clear it’s a real program and there are real airplanes flying. Well now you have to figure out: What are we bringing to the fight? What improved? How certain are you that you’ve got the best airplane to win?” Roper wondered.

“How do you deal with a threat if you don’t know what the future technology is? Be the threat — always have a new airplane coming out.”

Three industrial technologies enable a Century Series approach for NGAD and will set requirements for participants, Roper said. The first is agile software development — a practice where programmers quickly write, test and release code, soliciting feedback along the way from users.

The second, open architecture, has long been a buzzword in the defense community, but Roper said industry often uses it to describe a system with plug-and-play hardware. NGAD, ideally, would be fully open, with interchangeable hardware and the ability for a third party to develop software for the system.

The final technology, digital engineering, is the most nascent and possibly the most revolutionary, Roper said. While aerospace engineers have used computers for decades to aid in the creation of aircraft, only recently have defense companies developed 3D-modeling tools that can model an entire life cycle — design, production and sustainment — with a high level of accuracy and fidelity. The process would allow companies to not only map out an aircraft in extreme detail, but also model how a production line would work using different levels of manning or how maintainers would carry out repairs at a depot.

“You could start learning so much before you ever bent the first piece of metal and turned the first wrench, so that when you did do it for the first time, you already have learned. You’re already up to a level of proficiency that in the past you would have to be in the 100th aircraft to have,” he said. “And then if you kept going and you modeled the maintenance, then you could go after the part of the life cycle that constitutes the 70 percent of what we pay."

Few defense programs have used digital engineering so far, Roper said. The Air Force is requiring Northrop Grumman and Boeing to use the technique to develop their respective versions of the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent.


Lockheed Martin:



Boeing:



Air Force Research Laboratory:

 

Winston

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RAF F-35s. As always, click on image for full size:

 

Mugs914

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As I recall it is called a Cri Cri and has been built with many different types power plant, including two-stroke single cylinder piston motors (with tuned pipes, even!), electric motors with props, electric ducted fans and tiny jet engines as above.

Usually billed as "the smallest twin engined (jet, fan, electric, etc.) airplane in the world"

Cute little thing... Kinda looks like the canopy is on backwards.
 

MClark

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Cri Cri is correct.
My brother had one sharing his hangar, it had so many engine failures the owner told the control tower it was normal procedure to shut down one engine for landing.
 
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