Tape

Discussion in 'Low Power Rocketry (LPR)' started by tmazanec1, Nov 4, 2019.

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  1. Nov 4, 2019 #1

    tmazanec1

    tmazanec1

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    I don't remember from the Seventies...
    Do you use scotch tape or masking tape or what to secure the igniter and plug in the motor?
    Or does it make a difference?
     
  2. Nov 4, 2019 #2

    rharshberger

    rharshberger

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    Typically masking tape is used for igniters but scotch tape will work. Scotch tape is used in LPR to hold motors for staging together using a single wrap.
     
  3. Nov 4, 2019 #3

    samb

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    I don't use either because the plug does the job of holding the igniter in just fine for me.
     
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  4. Nov 4, 2019 #4

    neil_w

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    Well with the Estes motors nowadays you just use the included plastic plugs, no tape needed.
     
  5. Nov 4, 2019 #5

    hcmbanjo

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    Be sure to use the correct plastic plug. At club launches I always see first-timers with igniters falling out because they didn't use the right size plug.
     
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  6. Nov 4, 2019 #6

    neil_w

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    Truth.

    The Estes plugs are all color-coded and embossed with the compatible motor size. Sometimes, though, it's not a direct motor designation. Even though I keep my plugs neatly organized in my motor case, I've still gotten confused by the plug labels on occasion. I can't recall which size it is, or how it's labeled, but one particular plug size is not obvious what motors it's for from the label.

    So keep those plugs organized!
     
  7. Nov 4, 2019 #7

    kuririn

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  8. Nov 4, 2019 #8

    neil_w

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    Thanks for that link. I would love for the table to include the embossed label on each color as well... Maybe I'll go make my own when I get a chance.
     
  9. Nov 5, 2019 #9

    BABAR

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    Dump the plugs. Use a piece of wadding.

    Place motor nozzle end up.
    Drop the igniter in the nozzle. It should drop all the way to the power.
    Roll up a ball of Estes wadding or dog barf about the diameter of the nozzle.
    Use a semi-sharp object (I like a 0.9mm mechanical lead pencil with the led retraced) to push the ball of the wadding into the nozzle, this will force the wires apart (so they don't short) and make sure the tip contacts the propellant.

    If done correctly, for a lightweight low power rocket, you should be able to LIFT the rocket by the wires without the igniter coming lose.
    Works MUCH better than the plugs.

    has the advantage of not having to pick up the plastic plugs after the launch. Keep a bucket by the pad to dump the used wire.

    Learned this from John McCoy, the MicroMeister, may he rest in peace.
     

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