StratologgerCF

Discussion in 'Rocketry Electronics and Software' started by Steven88, Feb 10, 2019.

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  1. Feb 14, 2019 #31

    blackjack2564

    blackjack2564

    blackjack2564

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    Hook up the Strato to your computer and check voltage drop & recovery at the 2 events [apogee/main] that will tell the story.
     
  2. Mar 1, 2019 #32

    Voyager1

    Voyager1

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    I have never used multiple e-matches on any one output on any dual deployment altimeter, always just one. They are very reliable.

    I have two CFs that I use in a redundant dual deployment configuration.

    I would advise you to get the interface cable because you are missing out on much of the power of the altimeter for downloading data and configuration.
     
    timbucktoo and DaveW6DPS like this.
  3. Mar 15, 2019 at 6:23 PM #33

    Donnie

    Donnie

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    As someone in a unique position to answer this question, here are my thoughts...

    My main hobby has always been pyrotechnics... I do pyromusicals, which are fireworks shows choreographed to music and fired electronically.

    I use Cobra Firing Systems equipment, which until the last couple years had been powered solely by 9v alkaline batteries.

    I've fired thousands and thousands of ematch (at times over 1200 in a single show), and it is rare for a match to fail, but common enough to know 'it can happen.'

    So, on to the 9v's... ditch them is my short answer, and get a lipo. My second best answer, ditch the Duracells... go strictly with Energizer. There have been documented studies proving that the current output of 'fresh' Duracells is significantly lower than that of fresh Energizers.

    I'd also recommend going in series if you're using redundant matches in each deployment, as it will 1) take less current to fire and 2) give you a 'true' continuity reading.

    Just my .02, for what it's worth.
     
  4. Mar 16, 2019 at 3:37 AM #34

    Handeman

    Handeman

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    I really appreciate your experience, but I'll stick with my Duracells despite the lower current levels. I prefer the Duracells due to their spot welded internal connections. They might not be better for a fireworks display, but for survival in a rocket with the G-forces involved during flight, I won't fly anything else. Mine usually last 2 - 3 years before the voltage levels drops below the 9V level. Of course that is only for 10 to 15 match firings, not 1000s.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2019 at 6:05 AM #35

    Donnie

    Donnie

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    Fair enough, just adding some perspective.

    I'm always curious: . Why 9v at all? Honestly want to know, no ulterior motive, lol... I know that can be tough to convey in text format.
     
  6. Mar 16, 2019 at 2:35 PM #36

    dshmel

    dshmel

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    +1 on 2 ematches in parallel. I had one ematch failure that led to a ballistic recovery. Since then I have doubled them up. Every altimeter I have can fire two without a problem.
     
  7. Mar 17, 2019 at 1:13 AM #37

    Handeman

    Handeman

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    I started flying DD in 2007. I didn't have or use LiPos back then. I started out flying Perfectflite altimeters that beep out the battery voltage. Since I only download the altimeter data for special situations, I don't open the av-bay until the altimeter tells me the battery voltage is below 8.9 V. In most cases, this is three years of flights. Since I want dependability and low maintenance, I'll stick with the Duracell 9V with the tack welded internal connections and not having to charge or do anything with the battery until it's time to change it.

    I'm sure there are many out there that disagree with how I manage my batteries, but it's worked great for me for 12+ years so I'll stick with it.
     

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