Steve Eave's Saturn V

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

tfrielin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2016
Messages
248
Reaction score
99
A friend just sent me this youtube clip of Steve Eves' 1/10th scale Saturn V that he launched in 2009:



I'd never seen it before and was googling around for more informtion.

But before I dig into the links, can someone explain the "N and P" class engines that powered this rocket? Are they jumbo-sized composites? Or something beyond or other than regular composites? (I've never gone past F-class composites).

Wikipedia tells me that it generated 40,674 pounds of liftoff thrust---Amazing! So I was wondering about those engines.

(apologies if this is old news and/or common knowledge here...)
 
Are they jumbo-sized composites?

Yes, they are large composite motors.

Commercial composite motors are available, and certified for Level 3 (M, N, O) club flyers, up to "O" impulse range. Aerotech just had their O5280 certified recently. See it here:
https://www.rocketryforum.com/threads/aerotech-open-thread.125657/post-2370157


Here are a couple of their motors:

https://aerotech-rocketry.com/products/product_4c93a519-31ea-f9ec-966f-3aa3f40c0efa
https://aerotech-rocketry.com/products/product_4c93a519-31ea-f9ec-966f-3aa3f40c0efa

Beyond "O" impulse range, things get a little more complicated to fly.
 
It's hard to appreciate just how big Steve's "model" was. I helped staff the Skybuster's booth at the Cleveland Airshow that year where Steve had his Saturn V erected with a crane. It was... enormous. And it definitely drew a crowd, even when surrounded by some of the most impressive airframes on the planet.
 
It's hard to appreciate just how big Steve's "model" was. I helped staff the Skybuster's booth at the Cleveland Airshow that year where Steve had his Saturn V erected with a crane. It was... enormous. And it definitely drew a crowd, even when surrounded by some of the most impressive airframes on the planet.

It is amazing.

What is its flight history? Did it fly more than that one time as on youtube? I'd sure pay the price of admision to see that thing launch, that's for sure.
 
Pretty sure Steve and Chris Pearson and probably some other folks from NOTRA cast those motors in-house. I'll ask at the NOTRA/Skybusters party in a couple of weeks. Wouldn't shock me if they tested the propellant behind Steve's shop - he must have some understanding neighbors.
 
I was fortunate enough to see it fly in person. I was blessed enough to have my children with me to watch it in all it's glory. We had the best time as a family enjoying the event. My then 9 yr old son ask; "what happens if the parachute doesn't come out like some of your rockets?" I told him to get under the Yukon! Without skipping a beat, my 12 yr old daughter said; "I don't think that will help". 😆
 
It flew only that one time at MDRA in Maryland. Its now in a museum somewhere.
It went "ON TOUR" as part of the 50th anniversary NASA moon landing celebration. It's still part of the traveling exhibit.

At the After Holiday party last year, Steve said he would like to fly it again, but it has been moving around the world at NASAs discretion
 
Last edited:
Steve's rocket was amazing for sure.

It doesn't hold a candle to Down Right Ignorant though. It was the first in HPR and is what started the "Mega" rocket builds. It is generally what was the inspiration for all the people like Steve who built their ultra large scale rockets.

Its amazing to see where we've come over the years. :)
 
Steve's rocket was amazing for sure.

It doesn't hold a candle to Down Right Ignorant though. It was the first in HPR and is what started the "Mega" rocket builds. It is generally what was the inspiration for all the people like Steve who built their ultra large scale rockets.

Its amazing to see where we've come over the years. :)
Did it recover well? I seem to forget, it's been so long ago.:D I keep telling myself I need to digitize all those Earl Cagle Point 39 Production VHS videos I have from the 1990's and early 2000's. Have the gear to do it--just keeps slipping to the bottom of my to-do list.

Knowing Steve, I doubt DRI had that much of an inspiration on his rocket building. Last night, I watched the Point 39 Productions video of LDRS-XV and SmallBalls-1. Steves Mega-I-ROC was one of the featured flights at that LDRS launch.
 
Last edited:
Did it recover well? I seem to forget, it's been so long ago.:D I keep telling myself I need to digitize all those Earl Cagle Point 39 Production VHS videos I have from the 1990's and early 2000's. Have the gear to do it--just keeps slipping to the bottom of my to-do list.

Knowing Steve, I doubt DRI had that much of an inspiration on his rocket building. Last night, I watched the Point 39 Productions video of LDRS-XV and SmallBalls-1. Steves Mega-I-ROC was one of the featured flights at that LDRS launch.
I'd sure love to be able to get DVD copies of those videos that you have.
 
I'd sure love to be able to get DVD copies of those videos that you have.
Other than making an archive digital copy for myself, making copies and distributing would require getting permission from Earl, as I believe his work is copyright protected. Haven't talked with Earl sense he filmed the MDRA Liberty project. Come to think about that, not sure he ever finished the production of that video.
 
Other than making an archive digital copy for myself, making copies and distributing would require getting permission from Earl, as I believe his work is copyright protected. Haven't talked with Earl sense he filmed the MDRA Liberty project. Come to think about that, not sure he ever finished the production of that video.
I remember seeing the 39 Productions ads back in the old high power magazine that I have and I figured that they were no longer doing it.
 
I'd buy a ticket to see it fly again in person.
I bought a ticket to see it. :)

If you come to Denver, it is part of the current Apollo Exhibit at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. It is a beautiful model. The only clue to it being a flying model are the motor tubes at the aft end, rather than engine bells.
The Apollo Exhibit is very well done. If you have a chance to see it, do so. I am not sure where it goes next, but I believe it is in Denver for at least another month.


ADE2591D-E2B6-4286-BB5C-C5C3F2214D64.jpeg
 
Back
Top