Spyder 10 AirBrake Recovery Camera Rocket

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BABAR

Builds Rockets for NASA
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descent
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Second flight, really happy with rocket. Not best video, you can see the dead center in the screen at second 28, and just below the sun at image 34. It is rocking back and forth a bit, but overall smooth decent. Unfortunately the onboard camera battery died, so no inflight video yet, hopefully soon.


Pictures show the rocket. You can see that attachment point for the 808 Keychain Camera. I have a lanyard attached for security, although probably doesn't need it. You will see a "window" cut in the side rotor just below the hinge (technically I should call the side pieces the "brakes", but since the design is similar to many of my helicopters I tend to call them rotors.) The set up is to allow the rear facing camera to video the rocket ascent, and then once the rotors/brakes deploy, the lens looks through the "window" and videos the descent as well. The AirBrake recovery teamed up with the video allows a hopefully relatively steady video of the descent stage. This is a problem for most rockets, as the rocking and rolling of the rocket/camera as it dangles from the parachute usually has lots and lots of motion.

Look at pic 4 and you will see two pegs sticking out just above the "window". Once you see them there, you can locate them on pic 1. These pegs are supports for the camera on ascent, so the camera is relatively easily held in place by just a piece of electrical tape, allowing easy access to the two working buttons on the camera.

There are two major differences between my AirBrake Recovery Camera rocket and my Helicopters.

First, there is there is no "angle" on the hinge for the AirBrake Recovery rockets. This angle is what induces rotation of the rotors on the Helis, exactly what I am trying to avoid on the CAMERA rocket. For AirBrake recovery WITHOUT a camera, it is not a problem, although the asymmetry does tend to induce some rotation even without an angled hinge.

Second, on the Helicopters the fins are attached planar with the rotors (this system is used in Fliskits TiddlyWink.) Really good system for Helis, as the fins act as, well, fins on ascent, but they also contribute surface area and therefore "lift" on descent. It is also they way I do my non-Camera AirBrake recovery, even without intentional spin, the flat planar surface perpendicular to the descent path adds drag, which is what I want. As mentioned above, however, they do induce a bit of rotation even without the angle. So on the CAMERA rockets, fins are mounted perpendicular to the rotor/brake (actually makes it a bit tougher build.) Once the brakes are deployed, the fins actually help prevent rotation, at least they are supposed to.

Hopefully I can get a charged camera working and get some flight vids soon, weather permitting.

Tom
 
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Padseven

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descentView attachment 383214 View attachment 383215 View attachment 383216 View attachment 383217 View attachment 383218 View attachment 383219 View attachment 383220 View attachment 383221 View attachment 383222 View attachment 383223

Second flight, really happy with rocket. Not best video, you can see the dead center in the screen at second 28, and just below the sun at image 34. It is rocking back and forth a bit, but overall smooth decent. Unfortunately the onboard camera battery died, so no inflight video yet, hopefully soon.


Pictures show the rocket. You can see that attachment point for the 808 Keychain Camera. I have a lanyard attached for security, although probably doesn't need it. You will see a "window" cut in the side rotor just below the hinge (technically I should call the side pieces the "brakes", but since the design is similar to many of my helicopters I tend to call them rotors.) The set up is to allow the rear facing camera to video the rocket ascent, and then once the rotors/brakes deploy, the lens looks through the "window" and videos the descent as well. The AirBrake recovery teamed up with the video allows a hopefully relatively steady video of the descent stage. This is a problem for most rockets, as the rocking and rolling of the rocket/camera as it dangles from the parachute usually has lots and lots of motion.

Look at pic 4 and you will see two pegs sticking out just above the "window". Once you see them there, you can locate them on pic 1. These pegs are supports for the camera on ascent, so the camera is relatively easily held in place by just a piece of electrical tape, allowing easy access to the two working buttons on the camera.

There are two major differences between my AirBrake Recovery Camera rocket and my Helicopters.

First, there is there is no "angle" on the hinge for the AirBrake Recovery rockets. This angle is what induces rotation of the rotors on the Helis, exactly what I am trying to avoid on the CAMERA rocket. For AirBrake recovery WITHOUT a camera, it is not a problem, although the asymmetry does tend to induce some rotation even without an angled hinge.

Second, on the Helicopters the fins are attached planar with the rotors (this system is used in Fliskits TiddlyWink.) Really good system for Helis, as the fins act as, well, fins on ascent, but they also contribute surface area and therefore "lift" on descent. It is also they way I do my non-Camera AirBrake recovery, even without intentional spin, the flat planar surface perpendicular to the descent path adds drag, which is what I want. As mentioned above, however, they do induce a bit of rotation even without the angle. So on the CAMERA rockets, fins are mounted perpendicular to the rotor/brake (actually makes it a bit tougher build.) Once the brakes are deployed, the fins actually help prevent rotation, at least they are supposed to.

Hopefully I can get a charged camera working and get some flight vids soon, weather permitting.

Tom
Fantastic project, great job!
 
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