Split Cameras

The Rocketry Forum

Help Support The Rocketry Forum:

rocketace

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
155
Reaction score
91
Could you draw a little diagram showing the hookup points on the fixed or adjustable BEC direct to the cam and batteries....I'm electronically challenged
The pictures on Amazon can do better than I could. Basically you have the positive form the battery (VBAT) and its ground. Then on the bottom you have the ground and positive 5V going out to your device.



1614608777356.png
 

shockie

High Plains Drifter
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
669
Reaction score
265
Location
My Old Kentucky Home
The pictures on Amazon can do better than I could. Basically you have the positive form the battery (VBAT) and its ground. Then on the bottom you have the ground and positive 5V going out to your device.



View attachment 452999
I'm looking at the picture you posted earlier showing the various devices...what kind of connectors are being used. It appears you have red/black coming out both ends of the split camera...I guess one end of the camera connects to the bec and the other end to the battery? That's what I was asking you to show.
 

rocketace

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
155
Reaction score
91
I'm looking at the picture you posted earlier showing the various devices...what kind of connectors are being used.
I am not sure which specific picture you are referring too. The picture that I had showing all the devices I believe was the different batteries, BECs, and a wifi switch, no camera in that picture. I am using all JST connectors at the moment just for testing. In the end I will probably just solder everything straight together.

The BEC goes in series in-between the battery and camera. Taking any switch out of the loop just for simplification you get the below. The blue is the battery, greed is the BEC, and orange is the camera.
batt1.jpg


Now, My plans have changed a little and I now plan to add a voltage cut off circuit into the loop so I can use a smaller battery and just have it cut out when the voltage drops below 6v. Below shows the same with the voltage cut off circuit (Purple) and a switch (Gray). I got this circuit off Ebay.

batt2.jpg
 

shockie

High Plains Drifter
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
669
Reaction score
265
Location
My Old Kentucky Home
I am not sure which specific picture you are referring too. The picture that I had showing all the devices I believe was the different batteries, BECs, and a wifi switch, no camera in that picture. I am using all JST connectors at the moment just for testing. In the end I will probably just solder everything straight together.

The BEC goes in series in-between the battery and camera. Taking any switch out of the loop just for simplification you get the below. The blue is the battery, greed is the BEC, and orange is the camera.
View attachment 453003

Now, My plans have changed a little and I now plan to add a voltage cut off circuit into the loop so I can use a smaller battery and just have it cut out when the voltage drops below 6v. Below shows the same with the voltage cut off circuit (Purple) and a switch (Gray). I got this circuit off Ebay.

View attachment 453004
Thanks very much Jason!
 

shockie

High Plains Drifter
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
669
Reaction score
265
Location
My Old Kentucky Home
 
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
16
Reaction score
5
I’ve just completed my runcam setup. It’s a runcam split 3 nano with adjustable voltage regulator set to 7.2v. I’ve added an aluminum heat sink to prevent overheating which seemed to help when testing outside the rocket. While inside the rocket I left it recording with featherweight gps tracker and eggtimer quantum altimeter powered on and ready to test separation charges to ensure no signal interference between the electronics. All testing went perfect minus the camera overheating and shutting off after 17 mins of recording. I would be very interested to see what you guys have done to prevent this overheating. Pictured is my setup that mounts inside the payload section of the rocket with 1/2” hole drilled for the camera lens. Is it because of it being so enclosed? I’m lost on what to do with this thing to get it working correctly. It’s a shame that such a great quality camera is plagued by overheating issues.
A489001A-69F0-4618-BA43-D55B0D80A601.jpeg
 

Richard Dierking

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
347
Reaction score
150
Location
Temecula, CA
The heat sink will work if it can effectively dissipate the heat to the outside. For passive cooling, I think you would almost need conduction of the heat to outside of the airframe with a heat sink and maybe a large surface area. But, it's summer now and pretty warm outside too.
I think we would need a more active way of cooling, and that means including a fan and perhaps drawing/forcing cooler air into the bay.
When I was trying to keep a GoPro Hero Session cool in a 3" clear polycarbonate tube, I tried to introduce cooler air by using compressed air through a tube inserted into the camera bay on the pad before launch. (Note, the altimeter was not in this bay.) It worked OK, and the camera shutdown after it landed and before recovery. btw, the Hero self-heats to improve LiPo battery performance, but this is a problem for our applications.
Alternatively, perhaps add 3D printed air ducts (would create more drag on the rocket of course) and get the rocket launched asap.
Here's a link to a micro-sized air cooling fan: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0866RPBM4
I'm going to get one for bench testing.
 

OverTheTop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
5,323
Reaction score
2,654
Location
Melbourne Australia
I have had a number of cameras shut down due to overheating on the pad. It is a significant problem. I am thinking about using sunshields that drop off during launch.
 
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
16
Reaction score
5
The heat sink will work if it can effectively dissipate the heat to the outside. For passive cooling, I think you would almost need conduction of the heat to outside of the airframe with a heat sink and maybe a large surface area. But, it's summer now and pretty warm outside too.
I think we would need a more active way of cooling, and that means including a fan and perhaps drawing/forcing cooler air into the bay.
When I was trying to keep a GoPro Hero Session cool in a 3" clear polycarbonate tube, I tried to introduce cooler air by using compressed air through a tube inserted into the camera bay on the pad before launch. (Note, the altimeter was not in this bay.) It worked OK, and the camera shutdown after it landed and before recovery. btw, the Hero self-heats to improve LiPo battery performance, but this is a problem for our applications.
Alternatively, perhaps add 3D printed air ducts (would create more drag on the rocket of course) and get the rocket launched asap.
Here's a link to a micro-sized air cooling fan: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0866RPBM4
I'm going to get one for bench testing.
That fan is interesting. I’m using a 2200 mah 2s lipo. I’m curious if it would be ok to power that with the same lipo.
 

Richard Dierking

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
347
Reaction score
150
Location
Temecula, CA
I've used a small sheet of Reflectix on the outside of the airframe in the summer because the SoCal deserts have really intense heat July through Sept. Tip: Never lay your rocket down flat in the Sun because it will get hot quickly. I'm a retired contractor, and we would place all tools at a 45 degree angle when you are using them outside (like pipe wrenches and even rebar). They do not get hot that way, and the same applies to rockets.

I was thinking a 1S LiPo to power the cooling fan. You could even twist the positive wire together with some tape and tuck in the air vent hole at the pad. I would never do that to arm an altimeter but may be a good solution to applying power in this case.
So, the first thing I would do is get the fan and a small 1S LiPo and run it on the bench. See how it does. Then, maybe in a tube with an inlet and outlet hole.

I've used aquarium digital thermometers to monitor the heat inside tubes exposed to the Sun to check temperature rise. Here's a dual temp probe I picked up on Amazon that has a probe that fits through a 3/16" hole. Great for monitoring two temps like inside/outside.
IMG_3576.jpg
 

tsmith1315

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 16, 2020
Messages
814
Reaction score
607
Location
Doerun, GA
I was thinking a 1S LiPo to power the cooling fan. You could even twist the positive wire together with some tape and tuck in the air vent hole at the pad. I would never do that to arm an altimeter but may be a good solution to applying power in this case.
Sounds like a good application for OverTheTop's magnetic umbilical (look at the very bottom of the linked post)
 

Richard Dierking

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
347
Reaction score
150
Location
Temecula, CA

OverTheTop

Well-Known Member
TRF Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Messages
5,323
Reaction score
2,654
Location
Melbourne Australia
You can buy quite small fans and blowers. Here are a couple of examples:

The axial fans move quite a bit of air but don't do so well against any backpressure. The radial blowers work far better against back pressure, but don't move as much air overall, generally speaking.

I ordered some just a couple of days ago. Some for our 3D printers, some for rocketry ;).
 

ChuckH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2011
Messages
451
Reaction score
149
Do the 1080P split cameras have overheating issues? If not, I'm going to ditch my 4K for one of those. I'd rather have HD video of my whole flight as opposed to 4K video of it sitting on the pad until it overheats lol.
 
Top