Spinning Rockets?

Discussion in 'Low Power Rocketry (LPR)' started by darthgriffin, Oct 31, 2011.

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  1. Jan 10, 2016 #31

    mbecks

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    The video above shows a spinning rocket recovering just fine.
     
  2. Jan 18, 2016 #32

    YodaMcFly

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    I know that, by design, the Terrier-Improved Orion is spin-stabilized; I recently saw a video of one launched from Wallops, and, especially after staging, it was very visible. (Can't find the stupid video, now).

    Of course, this, for me, raises a different question: it seems that, aerodynamically, you want the rocket to move as "straight" (for lack of a better word) as possible. Every event that causes the fins to "direct" the air, rather than move smoothly through it, is going to induce more drag. So, the question: why spin stabilize? I know that it's been used extensively in "real life" (Honest John is another one that comes immediately to mind), but I'm trying to understand why...

    Anyone with a better understanding of the aerodynamics than I have able to explain?
     
  3. Jan 18, 2016 #33

    shreadvector

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  4. Mar 28, 2019 #34

    Matt_The_RocketMan

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    Refernce making a rocket with a vane [​IMG]
     
  5. Mar 30, 2019 #35

    cbwho

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    You spin stabilize for accuracy. Of course you don't go as far but at least you are on track.
     
  6. Mar 30, 2019 #36

    JumpJet

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  7. Mar 31, 2019 #37

    Alan15578

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  8. Mar 31, 2019 #38

    Alan15578

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    The original Camroc carrier was actually called the Delta, the "Camroc Carrier" was a later single stage design. My question to John remains.
     
  9. Apr 2, 2019 #39

    jqavins

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    (I haven't read the whole thread yet, so please forgive redundancy, repetition, restatements, and the like.)

    Apogee has a kit called the Slo Mo which has canted fins and some high drag features for a slow liftoff.

    I've made one with canted motors. Not the usual canting outward, but canted out of plane. I took a Sunward cluster kit for 2×18 mm in a BT60, inserted the two motor tubes in the two centering rings, then twisted on ring with respect to the other. That should spin like a sunuvabich, but I haven't launched it. No fins; hey, bullets don't need'm. It has no launch lug, as I suspect it would spin so hard it'll rip a lug right off, so it needs to be tube launched. I haven't decided on/acquired the right tube, which is the main reason I haven't launched it.
     

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