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slotting Quantum or phlexible tubing

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rocketsonly

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Hey all. I know it's possible to slot phenolic tubing with a circular saw (a chop saw?) or router; but is it possible to slot Quantum or phlexible tubing with the same methods? Has anyone tried?
Thanks.
 

Missileman

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I have slotted Quantum tubing with a router with no problems.
 

stevecarr

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I made a jig ala Norm Abrams and used my Roto Zip.
 

lalligood

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Originally posted by rocketsonly
Hey all. I know it's possible to slot phenolic tubing with a circular saw (a chop saw?) or router; but is it possible to slot Quantum or phlexible tubing with the same methods? Has anyone tried?
Thanks.
I wouldn't do this with QT for a variety of reasons, but (phlexible) phenolic tubing cuts/slots pretty sweet with a cut-off wheel on a Dremel!
 

rocketsonly

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I wouldn't do this with QT for a variety of reasons, but (phlexible) phenolic tubing cuts/slots pretty sweet with a cut-off wheel on a Dremel!
Which reasons?
Thanks.
 

lalligood

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Originally posted by rocketsonly
Which reasons?
Thanks.
1) Heat. QT fails under stress from heat--that's why you're not supposed to use it for flights > .85 mach & for MMT tubing because it overloads or weakens the material, respectively. Spinning a cutting wheel at 15-30K rpms is going to generate quite a bit of unwanted heat...

2) Plastics tend to not cut very well with a Dremel. Again, heat plays a part in causing the material that you are cutting away to stick together & glom on (not fall away cleanly), creating a bit of a mess & work to go back to clean up the cut properly. (I bet there's also a "technical" term for what I'm describing too.)

There are probably more but these are good enough reasons to prove my point. A saw or router works better because they are much more efficient in removing the material being cut away while keeping heat from friction to a minimum.

HTH,
 

Ryan S.

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I have used a handheld scroll saw and once a saws-all ( i know know the technical name) they came out alright
 
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