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Setting up a new shop: Tool organizing suggestions needed

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Zeus-cat

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I have a pegboard in my current house and use pegboard hooks for screwdrivers, hammers and small hand tools. I'm not crazy about this as I pull the hooks off a lot. Anyone have a tool organization system that they like? If the hooks would stay in I would be OK with pegboard.

I will have two poured concrete walls and several walls that are just studs now, but will have drywall later. The table saw will go in the large area on the right. The bandsaw and other smaller tools will go in the small area near the electrical panels. I will probably put some shelves and cabinets in the area to store wood and tools.

Shop.png
 

rharshberger

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I have a pegboard in my current house and use pegboard hooks for screwdrivers, hammers and small hand tools. I'm not crazy about this as I pull the hooks off a lot. Anyone have a tool organization system that they like? If the hooks would stay in I would be OK with pegboard.

I will have two poured concrete walls and several walls that are just studs now, but will have drywall later. The table saw will go in the large area on the right. The bandsaw and other smaller tools will go in the small area near the electrical panels. I will probably put some shelves and cabinets in the area to store wood and tools.

View attachment 301954
Make sure and have lots of electrical outlets, insulate the walls and ceiling. I like to use plywood instead of drywall above workbench level so I can attach any rack or shelf anywhere instead of relying on screwing into just studs.
 
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blackbrandt

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Agreed on that. Make sure you don't skimp on electrical outlets.
 

bclark989

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I always tape the hooks down once I know I'm happy with where everything is.

With tool chests, I like to make foam core shadow boards for everything, but that only works if you have enough drawer space for everything. For me, that means I enjoy that luxury at work, but not at home=P At home I don't even have a peg board. One decent sized tool chest with 4 drawers: Screw drivers, wrenches, marking/cutting, and rocket specific tools. I have another smaller toolbox that doubles as my field box, so it has a little of everything. Then I have a big stack of those Rubbermaid drawers that i use for glue, sand paper, tape, precision measurement tools, and a few other random things.
 

Zeus-cat

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Originally the electrician had only put two outlets on each side of the shared wall just inside the doors. I had them put two more on each side on the shared wall coming off the concrete wall. To pass inspection any outlets on the concrete wall would need to be in conduit. I had to have one as I may have a lift pump added for a bathroom, but I didn't want to pay for any more. I also have two outlets in the ceiling in each room as I hung LED Shop lights. Not the easiest to get to as I have 9 foot ceilings. I will probably add some more outlets to the wall with doors (if it doesn't have any - I can't remember right now, but I'll check tomorrow on a site visit). Hopefully, we get the house turned over to us next Thursday.
 

catman001

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I love pegboard for the ability to add and move things around. Once I have them in place, I get the hot glue gun heated up and lay a bead of glue on the back side of the hook and press it against the board. If I need to move them, a good tug will pop them loose from the board.

One thing that is important to me in my shop and hobby area is a good floor. Concrete will get old fast. Carpet is a no-no. I went with 12" vinyl tiles. Easy to do yourself, reasonable in cost, and makes a nice floor for a shop. Easy to sweep and mop, and if you damage one, easy to replace.

Mike
 

tomsteve

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: Setting up a new shop: Tool organizing suggestions needed

set it up and never work it it. always organized!!LOLOL

does anyone ever get their shop to a point they don't change something?
 

Zeus-cat

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I use pegboard hook retainers to keep everything in place. You can buy them at Home Depot/Lowes or online, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BQR7BI/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

View attachment 301997View attachment 301998
I have never heard of these things; very interesting. I might give the hot glue a try first as suggested by catman001, but if that doesn't work well for me these would be worth a try.

Flooring is something I am putting off for now. Building a house is just too expensive to do all of this right away.

Thanks for all of the suggestions.
 
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rharshberger

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soopirV

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+1 I use those clips as well, they are removable too but can be a pain to remove or they can just be pulled off with pliers.
Don't buy the set at HarborFreight- I did, and the clips don't hold worth a damn. I have a piece of pegboard in my shop over my 44" rolling tool chest (which IS from Harbor Freight and is AWESOME). I have all my small tools in the chest, organized on dedicated devices (also available from HF). My screwdrivers are sorted based on tip style, and are held in place in the top drawer against a couple of those magnetic holders that I bolted to the drawer bottom with a couple of #8 machine screws. This keeps them very easy to grab, and keeps them from rolling around. On the pegboard are things that don't fit in the chest- saws, hammers, bar clamps etc. I like the idea of using hot glue, will give that a try since I have established my layout the way I like.
For the floor (mine is in a garage, seems like yours is in a basement, not sure it would work) I used 100% solids epoxy floor covering. Looks nice, and since my shop doubles as a brewery, it's very easy to mop up.
 

rharshberger

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Don't buy the set at HarborFreight- I did, and the clips don't hold worth a damn. I have a piece of pegboard in my shop over my 44" rolling tool chest (which IS from Harbor Freight and is AWESOME). I have all my small tools in the chest, organized on dedicated devices (also available from HF). My screwdrivers are sorted based on tip style, and are held in place in the top drawer against a couple of those magnetic holders that I bolted to the drawer bottom with a couple of #8 machine screws. This keeps them very easy to grab, and keeps them from rolling around. On the pegboard are things that don't fit in the chest- saws, hammers, bar clamps etc. I like the idea of using hot glue, will give that a try since I have established my layout the way I like.
For the floor (mine is in a garage, seems like yours is in a basement, not sure it would work) I used 100% solids epoxy floor covering. Looks nice, and since my shop doubles as a brewery, it's very easy to mop up.
+1 the epoxy floor finishes they are very tough and oil doesn't seem to hurt them. They also look very nice.
 

LW Bercini

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And while you are pondering the set up, don't forget to address storage for completed projects!
 

soopirV

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+1 the epoxy floor finishes they are very tough and oil doesn't seem to hurt them. They also look very nice.
Thanks Rich- one little point I want to draw out so anyone reading this later isn't disappointed- there are several types of epoxy floor finishes. My own experience is with a 2-part product sold online only that is 100% solids (meaning no carriers that evaporate- the carriers make it more spreadable, but you end up with a thinner coat). Takes a long time to cure (24h to set, 72-96 to cure for foot traffic, and 10d for cars). The kits you can buy at HomeDepot or Lowes are only partially solid...I can't find any reputable numbers now, but at the time I remember seeing that they were 50-70% solids...so they cure faster, but may not leave a durable a finish.
If anyone goes epoxy route, some hints:
1) Moisture test. For reals. If too high for the kit, don't apply.
2) Be ready to throw out a set of clothes, some basic accessories (buckets, paint mixing rod, maybe a drill (I had to))- epoxy for floors is not much different than epoxy for layups, so I expect many folks here have the PPE ideas down, but there's an empirical difference between glassing a 4" tube with epoxy and coating a floor. Use a mixing tool to combine- buys you more working time. Once the two parts are mixed per the instructions, DUMP THE COMPOUND on the floor- like laminating epoxy, it sets up fast if in any confined space/volume.
3) Have one person set to brush in the corners/edges, the other to roller the flat open areas. Do no more than about 25 sq feet at a time (maybe 30, don't remember...but it was roughly quadrants of my 2 car garage).
4) If using 100% solids epoxy, expect bubbles. There are no VOC to help reduce surface tension, so after application, you can expect your floor to look like some sick 3rd grader has blown bubbles up through the epoxy ALL OVER. The instructions warned us about this, and suggested we continue to back roll the product, but we didn't see any bubbles UNTIL the product began to set. We tried to flame them away with a propane torch, which worked, but only for the areas we could reach, since the floor was still wet, and much of it was removed from easy access. I then resorted to a tent pole with a bamboo skewer taped to the end. I spent about 2 hours popping bubbles with the skewer, and still have evidence of them on the floor. I've sense gotten over it, but at the time, it was a major disappointment seeing these little "rings" of raised epoxy on an otherwise flawless floor.
5) No matter if you use the 100% solids or the big box version, once it's time to apply chips, start small, and pay attention! Once you have the coating laid down, it was time to lay the flecks. These are to provide visual interest as well as traction. Don't know what they are, but they come in a bag and look like paint chips. You can't wait until the entire space is done (unless you've only got 30sq/ft of space) because you need to be able to reach it while the epoxy is still uncured. Sweep up any flecks that land in areas that haven't yet been coated. Also, fleck sparingly, at least to start. Anecdote- skip to end if you wish: I studied the instructions, and after laying the epoxy in in the first 20^2ft place, I grabbed the bag of accent chips. Wife was there, and wanted to help, so she grabbed a handful too. I neglected to explain that the idea was a gentle rain-like coverage from above, delivered by gently tossing a small amount of flakes into the air, allowing them to drift down and settle onto the newly adhered floor. Instead, she took Nolan Ryan's approach, and decided to pitch the flakes she held right at the surface. Her side of the garage (where I started) now has what appears to be a comet re-entry map preserved on the floor.
 

rharshberger

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Thanks Rich- one little point I want to draw out so anyone reading this later isn't disappointed- there are several types of epoxy floor finishes. My own experience is with a 2-part product sold online only that is 100% solids (meaning no carriers that evaporate- the carriers make it more spreadable, but you end up with a thinner coat). Takes a long time to cure (24h to set, 72-96 to cure for foot traffic, and 10d for cars). The kits you can buy at HomeDepot or Lowes are only partially solid...I can't find any reputable numbers now, but at the time I remember seeing that they were 50-70% solids...so they cure faster, but may not leave a durable a finish.
If anyone goes epoxy route, some hints:
1) Moisture test. For reals. If too high for the kit, don't apply.
2) Be ready to throw out a set of clothes, some basic accessories (buckets, paint mixing rod, maybe a drill (I had to))- epoxy for floors is not much different than epoxy for layups, so I expect many folks here have the PPE ideas down, but there's an empirical difference between glassing a 4" tube with epoxy and coating a floor. Use a mixing tool to combine- buys you more working time. Once the two parts are mixed per the instructions, DUMP THE COMPOUND on the floor- like laminating epoxy, it sets up fast if in any confined space/volume.
3) Have one person set to brush in the corners/edges, the other to roller the flat open areas. Do no more than about 25 sq feet at a time (maybe 30, don't remember...but it was roughly quadrants of my 2 car garage).
4) If using 100% solids epoxy, expect bubbles. There are no VOC to help reduce surface tension, so after application, you can expect your floor to look like some sick 3rd grader has blown bubbles up through the epoxy ALL OVER. The instructions warned us about this, and suggested we continue to back roll the product, but we didn't see any bubbles UNTIL the product began to set. We tried to flame them away with a propane torch, which worked, but only for the areas we could reach, since the floor was still wet, and much of it was removed from easy access. I then resorted to a tent pole with a bamboo skewer taped to the end. I spent about 2 hours popping bubbles with the skewer, and still have evidence of them on the floor. I've sense gotten over it, but at the time, it was a major disappointment seeing these little "rings" of raised epoxy on an otherwise flawless floor.
5) No matter if you use the 100% solids or the big box version, once it's time to apply chips, start small, and pay attention! Once you have the coating laid down, it was time to lay the flecks. These are to provide visual interest as well as traction. Don't know what they are, but they come in a bag and look like paint chips. You can't wait until the entire space is done (unless you've only got 30sq/ft of space) because you need to be able to reach it while the epoxy is still uncured. Sweep up any flecks that land in areas that haven't yet been coated. Also, fleck sparingly, at least to start. Anecdote- skip to end if you wish: I studied the instructions, and after laying the epoxy in in the first 20^2ft place, I grabbed the bag of accent chips. Wife was there, and wanted to help, so she grabbed a handful too. I neglected to explain that the idea was a gentle rain-like coverage from above, delivered by gently tossing a small amount of flakes into the air, allowing them to drift down and settle onto the newly adhered floor. Instead, she took Nolan Ryan's approach, and decided to pitch the flakes she held right at the surface. Her side of the garage (where I started) now has what appears to be a comet re-entry map preserved on the floor.
All good points SoopirV, the only experience I have had with the epoxy finishes is the ones sold via the Box Stores, that being said the individual I work with has made several comments that getting them right the first time means following the instructions EXACTLY, but the final results are great from what I have seen.
 

KenRico

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240v , vertical air compressor, retractable air hose, retactable light , led shop lights, ect

Kenny
 

dr wogz

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For the outlets: get two circuits.. so every 2nd outlet is on a different circuit. that way, if you blow one, the other is still working. ansd on that note, get three: 2 for outlets, and one for the lights! So, if you do blow a circuit, you still have light!

Take note with peg-board. They come with two different sized hoes; 1/4" dia & 3/16" dia. and get pegs to fit accordingly. And I've glued (epoxy) my hooks in place.. They always pull out, twist, etc.. Our local hardware store has a variety of hooks & specialty holders. Plan a cabinet or two under the bench. When you do yoru kitchen, get them to make a few extra cabinets & drawer sets for the basement.

The adjustable shelving is good for rockets too. Get the rails, get the longer shelf supports. (No need for the shelves) and get some stiff cardboard tubes (I used the tubes from Monokote rolls) and shove them tubes onto the shelf supports. Voila! instant wing / rocket storage..
 

OverTheTop

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Two things I find very handy in the workshop:

The assortment of wipes lives in a central location (next to the door) where I can easily get to them from the workshop or garage, and with very dirty hands.
rolls.jpg

Having all the measuring equipment in one location simplifies my decision on where to put stuff when I am cleaning up, and makes them easier to find when I need them :)
measuring.jpg

Oh, and a bin that can move to where I am working...
 

mkadams001

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Check out Pinterest for ideas for shop organization. There are some great ideas in there for small shops.
 

MClark

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Don't bother with pegboards or tool box, just dump everything on the work bench. That is where they end up anyway.

M
 

OverTheTop

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Don't bother with pegboards or tool box, just dump everything on the work bench. That is where they end up anyway.
Entropy is always increasing in any system. I just try to keep my workshop with lower entropy than the surrounding area. :wink: It does take effort and diligence.
 

Peartree

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As for pegboards, I have several and there are some hooks that I like and others that are near worthless, especially when the pegboards are in places where a dropped hook will fall somewhere that is nearly inaccessible. The cheap hooks are single prong and fall out the easiest. Two prong hooks are MUCH better especially if the prong is the same size as the pegboard hole and not undersized. They are a little harder to find, but are made by Stanley and other major brands so, although you might pay a little more, they should be readily available. Two prong hooks look like this:



And then, while I was searching, I saw a third kind that screw down and should definitely insure that they stay where you want them:

 

Gary Byrum

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Here's something for your bench that LW sent me as a gift. I really like this a lot. It replaced every coffee cup and container I'd been storing small tools in.

MICROMARK
 

TangoJuliet

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My hobby room is built for all my modeling hobbies - R/C airplanes, plastic models, rockets. I have a 12 drawer roll-around craft cart that hides under my workbench, out of the way, and contains all manner of various smaller modeling tools, and sanding materials, my Dremel, drill bits, etc. - and on top of it I have one of those Lazy Suzan's.

Above the bench on the short wall (my bench is "L" shaped) I have a paper towel holder and these for small hardware items: https://www.quantumstorage.com/bins-and-systems/clear-tip-out/bins
 

tball7

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Epoxy floor ( trust me ) and my wife got sick of all the rockets, some very big. So she had the garage ( er lab) ringed with large custom cabinets .. I have 2 that are 16 foot tall !!
 

OverTheTop

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Here are some pics of my setup. This is just the workshop, not including storeroom and garage. Total space for all of those is around 700 square feet.

Rocket Bench
RocketBenchresize.JPG

Mechanical Bench
MechBenchresize.JPG
Storage under the mechanical workbench works well. The pullout (on slides) parts washer is very convenient given how infrequently I use it. It is out of the way but can still be used in about 30 seconds if needed.
Don’t put your tools up too high on a pegboard. You need a ladder to get to the higher ones!

Electrical Bench
ElecBenchresize.JPG

Mill
Millresize.JPG
Some good racking is essential for keeping things under control. Big plastic buckets keep dust of everything.
The whiteboard is sliding on tracks so I can get to the things on the shelves behind it. That works very well.

Lathe
Latheresize.JPG
The shelf above the lathe is great for productivity. Everything you need is at your fingertips. Chuck keys, chuck jaws, quick-change toolpost holders, oil can, centers are all readily available for use. One useful addition I would like (and am lacking currently) is a power point near the lathe (away from any splashing coolant!) for when using toolpost grinders or other powered accessories.


If you have space, put a compressor up out of the way somewhere and provide a reticulated compressed air system. So convenient not having to get hoses out and run them to the compressor each time you need to use air. Just hit a switch on the wall to fire up the compressor, fit the air accessory and work!
 
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