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Setting Up a Maker Space

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RocketFeller

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What would you want, in terms of equipment, for a maker space?

I am starting a new position at my school next year as a fifth through eighth grade science teacher. I have a double-size classroom that will be my classroom/lab. My principal just spoke with me to let me know that our district's grant-writer is very interested in setting us up a "maker-space" (still a relatively new term to me) and asked for a wish-list of equipment. It would be used for school science projects, (obviously) but also for our rocket clubs (LPR and HPR) and possibly open after school to the community.

We can't have a bunch of shop equipment (we have the high school's wood shop for that) but other than that we are open to all suggestions.

Thanks in advance!
 

Marc_G

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Laser cutter capable of fin cutting. High quality vinyl printer / cutter. Printer capable of printing white (ALPS is gone but there is a high end replacement). Plastic 3D printer. Hood for use to reduce fumes.

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smugglervt

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Dremel and accessory attachments
Small vise or extra hands type devices for holding pieces while working on them
Soldering station
 

BABAR

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Good lighting
lots of counter space
maybe a shelf above the counter space to allow projects to dry
lots of power outlets
good fan or ventilation
drawers for "stuff"
 

boatgeek

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In addition to what other people have said:

Small drill press
A place to spray paint without fumigating the building (outside? a paint booth inside?)
A scroll saw if you can get it past the "not many power tools" rule
A bunch of hand tools (saws, files, wrenches, screwdrivers,...)
 

Kallahan11

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If your going to get a 3d printer, go for a quality one like a utilimaker (Stay away from Maker bot, and super cheapo's) That will save you endless hours of frustration.
 

cerving

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If you're doing any electronics, a good temperature controlled soldering station like a Hakko FX-888D. And of course, plenty of computers.
 

kclo4

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Unfortunately everything I would want in a maker space is heavy equipment I can't fit in my apartment. Mills, Lathes, chop saw, sanders, router tables, table saw, drill press, band saw, scroll saw, CNC router table, laser cutter, 3D printer(Prusa i3 MK2 is generally regarded as the best bang for the buck out there).

Composite equipment like a autoclave, vacuum pump, and vacuum bagging gear, etc.

I realize this is for 5th graders, but if it would have any pull or value to folks outside the school you need to bring the big guns. Otherwise the suggestions you got already are pretty good.
 

Cl(VII)

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snip...(Prusa i3 MK2 is generally regarded as the best bang for the buck out there)...snip
Just got mine working, and I so far I am very happy with it (perspective of a total 3D printing Noob). If you buy the kit, pencil in 10-15 hours to build and calibrate.

Also, to reiterate above comment, good lighting...lots of it, from multiple angles, and big flat work spaces. My 4'x8' workbench makes many tasks far less painful. Some retractable power cords from overhead are also really handy.
 
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RocketFeller

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Thank you for all the responses!

I am meeting with our grant writer in a week or so to talk over the wish list and look at what grants are appropriate/available.

Since things such as saws, lathes, power-sanders, drill presses, planers, et cetera are available at our high school, we probably won't be getting any big power tools. My thought is to focus on composite construction, electronics, 3D printing, and CNC millwork. I'm also looking at getting some computers dedicated to an autoCAD program like Solidworks or Fusion 360.

Keep the thoughts coming, and thanks again!
 

Cl(VII)

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Thank you for all the responses!

I am meeting with our grant writer in a week or so to talk over the wish list and look at what grants are appropriate/available.

Since things such as saws, lathes, power-sanders, drill presses, planers, et cetera are available at our high school, we probably won't be getting any big power tools. My thought is to focus on composite construction, electronics, 3D printing, and CNC millwork. I'm also looking at getting some computers dedicated to an autoCAD program like Solidworks or Fusion 360.

Keep the thoughts coming, and thanks again!
I'm also a big fan of Fusion 360. About as intuitive as a program of its nature could be, and their YouTube support videos are excellent and many.
 

dr wogz

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There are a bunch of 3D printers out there. Do your research. I'm in the process for our 3rd. We currently have a Makergear M2 and a Fusion3 360. We are looking at their latest, the Fusion3 F400. While $$, I strongly suggest it as a possible contender due to it's print size: 14" x 14" x 12.5" That's huge!

Add an NC or CNC desktop mill to the list..

A design studio / machine: Illustrator (or Corel Draw), AutoCAD, Autodesk's Inventor or Fusion 3D (or some other 3D parametric CAD program, to generate & modify geometry for the 3D printer!)

Paint booth with airbrush & detail / touch-up gun (And obviously a compressor with filters & a good regulator)

Camera, lights, and a photo booth..
 

boatgeek

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Thank you for all the responses!

I am meeting with our grant writer in a week or so to talk over the wish list and look at what grants are appropriate/available.

Since things such as saws, lathes, power-sanders, drill presses, planers, et cetera are available at our high school, we probably won't be getting any big power tools. My thought is to focus on composite construction, electronics, 3D printing, and CNC millwork. I'm also looking at getting some computers dedicated to an autoCAD program like Solidworks or Fusion 360.

Keep the thoughts coming, and thanks again!
If you're going to have the infrastructure for a CNC mill, I think it's foolish not to have a small drill press and combo belt/disc sander. A drill press like this (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Skil-10-...gclid=CM-P3OqT6NMCFRBLDQodMSQNUw&gclsrc=aw.ds) is cheap in the grander scheme and will save many trips across the way to the high school. Same thing with a medium-hobby-grade sander and basic scroll or band saw. If you have those things in your shop, you don't have to go over and open up the high school wood shop for small stuff. That will make your space more user-friendly and more accessible both to students and to the general community.

If that was in my community, I would sure pay a membership fee to use it.
 

BDB

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I just came from the maker space at my university. I'll include the link so you can see what they have for free use by students and faculty. They have about 10 3D printers that get used quite a bit. The vinyl cutter, mill, and laser cutter are nice but used rarely. The robotic arm and virtual reality stuff are never used, as far as I can tell. I suspect that 90% of the use in an educational maker space will be teaching students to use CAD and then to 3D print widgets, so I suggest getting multiple 3D printers.

http://web.uri.edu/space/
 

costnerk

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You could also get a desktop waterjet. I would also like test equipment like multimeters, power supplies, function generators, and oscilloscopes.
 
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