SCALE - Titan III Gallery

Discussion in 'Scale' started by Boosterdude, Jan 3, 2011.

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  1. Jan 3, 2011 #1

    Boosterdude

    Boosterdude

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    Titan IIIC
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Post copied to this thread with permission

    .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 7, 2011
  2. Feb 7, 2009 #2

    JAL3

    JAL3

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    Welcome to the SCALE - Titan III Gallery on TRF.

    This gallery showcases the Titan III and those rockets derived from it. Particularly appropriate in this thread are the following:


    Dr Zooch: Titan IIIc SLV5:



    as well as any upscales, downscales, clones, kitbashes or other derivative works. Even Goonies qualify!



    The Titan III was a modified Titan II with optional solid rocket boosters. It was developed on behalf of the United States Air Force as a heavy-lift satellite launcher to be used mainly to launch American military payloads and civilian intelligence agency satellites such as the Vela Hotel nuclear-test-ban monitoring satellites, observation and reconnaissance satellites (for intelligence-gathering), and various series of defense communications satellites.

    The Titan IIIA was a prototype rocket booster, which consisted of a standard Titan II rocket with a Transtage upper stage. The Titan IIIB with its different versions (23B, 24B, 33B, and 34B) had the Titan III core booster with an Agena D upper stage. This combination was used to launch the KH-8 GAMBIT series of intelligence-gathering satellites. They were all launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, due south over the Pacific into polar orbits. Their maximum payload mass was about 7,500 lb (3,000 kg).

    The powerful Titan IIIC used a Titan III core rocket with two large strap-on solid-fuel boosters to increase its launch thrust, and hence the maximum payload mass capability. The solid-fuel boosters that were developed for the Titan IIIC represented a significant engineering advance over previous solid-fueled rockets, due to their large size and thrust, and their advanced thrust-vector control systems. The Titan IIID was a derivative of the Titan IIIC, without the upper transtage, that was used to place members of the Key Hole series of reconnaissance satellites into low Earth orbits. The Titan IIIE, the one with an additional high-specific-impulse Centaur upper stage, was used to launch several scientific spacecraft, including both of NASA's two Voyager space probes to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond, and both of the two Viking missions to place two orbiters around Mars and two instrumented landers on its surface.

    The first guidance system for the Titan III used the AC Spark Plug company IMU (inertial measurement unit) and an IBM ASC-15 guidance computer from the Titan II. For the Titan III, the ASC-15 drum memory of the computer was lengthened to add 20 more usable tracks, which increased its memory capacity by 35%.

    The more-advanced Titan IIIC used the Delco Carousel VI IMU and the Magic 352 guidance computer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  3. Feb 7, 2009 #3

    JAL3

    JAL3

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    Dr Zooch Titan IIIc SLV5 Basic Information.

    [​IMG] Dr Zooch Rockets

    MODEL NAME: Titan IIIc SLV5, Titan IIIc

    NUMBER:

    Introduced:
    Final Year:
    Designer: Wes Oleszewski

    Type: Scale
    Motor Mount: 1x18mm
    Recovery: Parachute
    Stages: 1
    Length: 12.75"
    Diameter:
    Span:
    Weight: 3.6 oz

    Mfg. Description: This is the Dr. Zooch Rockets Titan IIIC SLV5 flying model rocket kit. It is a semi-scale model that represents the very first of the Titan IIIC launch vehicles, which flew on June 18, 1965 and lofted Space Launch Vehicle number 5 (SLV5) for the US Air Force. After that the Titan IIIC vehicles went on to fly 35 more times performing everything from sending the first pair of landers to the planet Mars, to having a starring role in the Oscar winning movie Marooned- when they fictionally launched one through the eye of a hurricane.

    When fully constructed this model stands 12.75 inches tall and has a basic empty weight of 3.6 ounces. It is single stage and uses a standard 18mm motor, such as a B6-4 (NO engines are included with the kit). Recovery is by parachute or by impact with the planet earth, depending on how close you follow the instructions. This is a basic skill level kit, meaning that almost anyone can build and fly it successfully. All of the primary parts are either wood or paper. So buy it, build it and wait for the eye of a hurricane so you can launch yours Hollywood style! (Dr Zooch 2011 Web Ad)


    Advertising Liveries

    [​IMG] Dr Zooch 2010 Web Ad

    [​IMG] UMRS 2011 Web Ad


    Face Card





    First post in this thread featuring this rocket.

    See Also: LINKS
    EMRR
    RocketReviews
    Mfg. Page


    If you have any additional information on this rocket and/or catalog photos please let us know.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  4. Mar 22, 2012 #4

    Fishhead

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  5. Oct 21, 2016 #5

    GlenP

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    DSC_6758 (1).jpg

    I made an experimental cardstock display stand for this one as a sort of test of the concept, inspired by the idea of the flame fins.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2016
  6. Oct 24, 2016 #6

    aerostadt

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    I put Sandman's Dyna-Soar X-20 on top of the Estes Titan III and used clear plastic fins. It flew straight on an Estes D12-3, but was a little wobbly towards the end of the flight. The fins sometimes break off at the root and are difficult to glue back on.

    IMG_0693.jpg IMG_0691.jpg IMG_0627_1.jpg IMG_0628_1.jpg
     

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